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PREFACE. 



In presenting this work to the Public, the Compilers feel themselves called upon to 
explain the feelings by which they have been actuated, and the motives in which it 
originated. Such an explanation is however in a great measure superseded by the 
deep interest and melancholy pleasure the work is calculated to excite, in the bosom of 
every relative or friend (in this country as well as in Europe)— on finding that the 
names of those whom they loved, regarded, esteemed or admired, are not altogether 
forgotten. Feeble though the attempt may be, something, however, has been done 
to perpetuate the memory of those who claim our affection or veneration : and also to 
evince respect for those whose remains lie entombed in this quarter of the Globe. Nor 
will it be deemed a work of supererogation to convey, by the medium of this work, to 
sorrowing connections in Europe, or elsewhere, the pure and consolatory satisfaction, 
that the last mark of respect and duty to departed worth, has not been omitted by 
their sorrowing friends and that the sacred deposits still remain with us, — are still 
kept in view, and as piously cared for, as on the day of their first interment. 

With such views, and with the desire to preserve from unmerited oblivion the 
hitherto neglected Biographies of India, — the Compilers have connected with the 
Obituary, Memoirs of the most distinguished men in the annals of Indian History ; 
— ^men, who have, at the sacrifice of their Uves, gradually raised the British Indian 
Empire to its present state of stability and eminence, by consohdating its Government, 
ameliorating the condition of its subjects, and embracing their temporal and spiritual 
happiness through the education of its people, and the protection of their rights and 
liberties from the encroachments of invading and cruel enemies. 

These great and good men have glided away from the stage on which they have 
shone so conspicuously : and it is the object of the Compilers, by this humble attempt 
to perpetuate, cherish, and embalm their memory, which becomes doubly dear from the 
consideration that they have fought, bled, and devoted their entire Hves and energies to 
promoting the glory of their country and the good of the people over whom Providence 
has willed that they should rule. 

The objects attained by this publication ar^ calculated to be two-fold : while it is, on 
the one hand, a memorial of such as have passed away from time to eternity, it will 
serve, on the other, and in a great measure, to influence the conduct of succeeding rulers, 
(in whose hands may be placed the future destinies of this vast empire,) exciting in 
them an honest spirit of emulation and a desire to imitate the virtues of their illustrious 
predecessors and thus secure for them a niche in our affection, and a claim to the like 
tribute to their own memory : nor is it for those alone who hold the reins of adminis- 
tration that the lesson conveyed by these reminiscences will obtain a due effect : since to 
every class and grade of society, the manifestation that there is no station of life wherein 
the good and honest men may not have their names and deeds imperishably recorded 
will become at once apparent. Who will deny that the sight of a mere Monument has 
not repeatedly inspired martial enthusiasm, the flame of patriotism or the emulation of 



vi PREFACE. 

genius in the youthful breast. '' Siste viator, heroe/n calcas" has awakened ardour in 
the minds of all who have perused the tablet. How much more then is not a memoir 
of the great actions of illutrious men, in every department of usefulness^ calculated to 
arouse attention and induce the like endeavour. 

It is utterly impossible to trace back the period when Monuments and Monumental 
Inscriptions were first adopted to commemorate the acts and actions of illustrious men. 
It is certain, however, that for all the ends and purposes enumerated. Monuments existed 
both in ancient as well as modem times. To us it appears, and we have the testi- 
mony of Holy Writ on this head, that their first origin may be traced as far back as 
the Universal Deluge, when the Rainbow was made, or selected, a standing token of the 
most awful judgment inflicted on a guilty world for its consummate wickedness, as well 
as a memorial of the subsequent love and pity displayed by the offended Deity after his 
divine justice has been satisfied. 

Although it is not in the power of all to command splendid Monuments, or rich 
Inscriptions, over the remains of their departed friends and relatives, yet they may 
be able to take effectual measures for securing those remains from premature decay, 
mutilations, or insult, by proper sepulture ; and it is remarkable, that it is in those 
communities only which are the most deeply impressed with that article of our faith 
the " Resurrection of the body*' that any real care is evinced in this respect . 

It would be an unpardonable inadvertence were we to omit the mention of our 
grateful thanks to Gentlemen here, and in the Mofussil, by whose generous contri- 
butions our Obituary has been enriched, and who have helped us, with a friendly 
hand, to bring this compilation to a close — ^the aid they have afforded being a sure 
testimony of the interest they themselves have taken in the work we originally 
projected. 

The Obituary comprehends events connected with a long series of years ; viz. from 
the first formation of the British settlement to the present time ; and includes a great 
number of Monumental Inscriptions, Memoirs and short Obituary Sketches. To the 
candour of a generous public, the Compilers submit their work, the first of a compre- 
hensive kind hitherto attempted in this country. The motives which prompted a 
publication on this plan cannot be wrong ; but if they have failed to realize their ideas, 
it is only because it is easier to project than to execute — to know what is right, than to 
be able to perform it. Every endeavour has been made to insure success, and no source 
of information has been left unexplored, or expense spared, in obtaining it, so as to 
render the work acceptable to subscribers. The Compilers, therefore, indulge the hope 
of a hberal patronage, which, if it be commensurate to the expenses incurred, will 
encourage them to offer a second volume by way of continuation, the collection of 
materials for the same being under course of arrangement, if the favor shown to the 
first attempt warrants a prosecution of the labour. 



THE 



BENGAL OBITUARY; 

OK, 

A RECORD TO PERPETUATE THE MEMORY 



OF 



DEPARTED WORTH: 

i)>:iN(; 

A COMPILATION OF TABLETS AND MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS FROM VARIOUS 

PARTS OF THE BENGAL AN'D AGRA PRESIDENCIES. 

TO AVHTOII IS ADDKI) 

IJingrnfliiral IketrljtH iinii JHemmrs 

OF 

SUCH AS HAVE PEE-EMINTSXTLY DTSTTNGinSHED THEMSELVES 

IN TlfK 

HISTORY OF BRITISH INDIA, 

STNCK TITK 

FORMATION OF THE EUROPEAN SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. 



BY 

HOLMES AND CO. 

39, COSSITOLLAH, CALCUTTA. 






• • 



* • — " 



W. THACKER A CO., 

No. 8 7, NEWGATE STREET, LONDON; 

AND 

ST. ANDREW'S LIBRARY, CALCUTTA. 



1851. 






THE NUW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

745669 A 

A8TOR, LENOX AltO 
rnj)BH FOUNDATIONS 






• • 



••• 



• • * 
• • • 






• • • ♦ ,- 

• •• • • • • I 

• • • • • • 

• • • • "l 



TO 



THE PUBLIC, 

THIS ATTEMPT 



TO PERPETUATE THE MEMORY 



OF 



DEPARTED WORTH, 



18, 



WITH THE GREATEST DEFERENCE, 
DEDICATED, 



BY 



THEIR MOST OBEDIENT AND HUMBLE SERVANTS, 



HOLMES AND CO. 



vi PREFACE. 

genius in the youthful breast. " Siate viator, heroem calcaa,** has awakened ardour ia 
the minds of all who have perused the tablet. How much more then is not a memoir 
of the great actions of illutrious men, in every department of usefulness^ calculated to 
arouse attention and induce the like endeavour. 

It is utterly impossible to trace back the period when Monuments and Monumental 
Inscriptions were first adopted to commemorate the acts and actions of illustrious men. 
It is certain, however, that for all the ends and purposes enumerated, Monuments existed 
both in ancient as well as modem times. To us it appears, and we have the testi- 
mony of Holy Writ on this head, that their first origin may be traced as far back as 
the Universal Deluge, when the Rainbow was made, or selected, a standing token of the 
most awful judgment inflicted on a guilty world for its consummate wickedness^ as well 
as a memorial of the subsequent love and pity dbplayed by the offended Deity after his 
divine justice has been satisfied. 

Although it is not in the power of all to command splendid MonumeutSj or ridh 
Inscriptions, over the remains of their departed friends and relatives, yet they may 
be able to take effectual measures for securing those remains from premature decaj, 
mutilations, or insult, by proper sepulture ; and it is remarkable, that it is in thooe 
communities only which are the most deeply impressed with that article of our faith 
the " Resurrection of the hodxf^ that any real care is evinced in this respect • 

It would be an unpardonable inadvertence were we to omit the mention of our 
grateful thanks to Gentlemen here, and in the Mofussil, by whose generous oontri- 
butions our Obituary has been enriched, and who have helped us, with a friendly 
hand, to bring this compilation to a close — ^the aid they have afforded being a sure 
testimony of the interest they themselves have taken in the work we originally 
projected. 

The Obituary comprehends events connected with a long series of years ; vie. from 
the first formation of the British settlement to the present time ; and includes a great 
number of Monumental Inscriptions, Memoirs and short Obituary Sketches. To the 
candour of a generous public, the Compilers submit their work, the first of a compre- 
hensive kind hitherto attempted in this country. The motives which prompted a 
publication on this plan cannot be wrong ; but if they have failed to realize their ideas, 
it is only because it is easier to project than to execute — to know what is right, than to 
be able to perform it. Every endeavour has been made to insure success, and no source 
of information has been left unexplored, or expense spared, in obtaining it, so aa to 
render the work acceptable to subscribers. The Compilers, therefore, indulge the hope 
of a liberal patronage, which, if it be commensurate to the expenses incurred, will 
encourage them to offer a second volume by way of continuation, the collection of 
materials for the same being under course of arrangement, if the favor shown to the 
first attempt warrants a prosecution of the labour. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



*%^^«^^^\^^'^%tf^%^^^^S^WW\^^^^M^^M^%« 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, MEMOIRS, &c. 



Pagt 
Hie Right Hon'ble Gilbert, Lord Minto, 

GrOTemor Greoeral of lodia, 1 

Governor Job Chamocki Founder of CaI- 

cotts, 2 

Bfrs. FrsDces Johnson, the oldest British 

resident (Mf Calcatta, 5 

Sir R. H. Bloesett, Knight, Chief justice of 

Bengal, 6 

Rt. Rev. T. F. Middleton, D. D. first Pro- 

testant Bishop and Metropolitan of all 

India 7 

Henry Lloyd Loring, first Archdeacon of 

Calcutta, 11 

Rt. Rev. Reginald Heber, D. D. Lord 

Bishop of Calcutta, 11 

Rt. Rev. J. T. James, D. D. Lord Bishop 

of Calcutta, 19 

Rt. Rev. J. M. Turner, D. D. Lord 

Bishop of Calcutta, 16 

Rt. Rer. Daniel Corrie, L. L. D. formerly 

Archdeacon of Calcutta and late Bishop 

of Madras, 20 

Wmiam Twining, Esq. C. R. C. L. S 23 

The Honourable John Adam, Governor 

General of India, 25 

Andrew Stirling, Esq. of the Bengal Civil 

Service 28 

Brigadier Thomas John Anquetil, late 

Commanding Shah Soojah's Army, . . • • 30 
James Pftttle, Esq. late of the Bengal Civil 

Service, •••-•••••• 31 

lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Kirkpatrick, •• 32 
Beiv. J. Z. Kiemander, Founder of the 

Old or Mission Church, 34 

Rev. Henry Martyn, Chaplain on the Ben- 
gal Establishment, 36 

R^. David Brown, Chaplain on the Bengal 

Esteblishment, 39 

The Rev. Tbos. lliomason. Chaplain on the 

Bengal EsUblishment, 40 

Rev. R. B. Boyee, Chaplain at the Old 

Church, 42 

Rer. W. Hovenden, B. D. Chaplain and 

Secretary to the Bengal Military Orphan 

Institution, ••• •• 44 

Mrs. Mary Brown, ...•• 45 

Mrs. CHiarlotte Vaughan, ib, 

Pnticulars of the cruelties of Suraj-ud- 

DdHah and the Tablet to the Memory 

of the Sufferers in the Black Hole, .... ib, 
Rt. Hon'ble Warren Hastings, L. L. D. 

F. R. 8. late Governor General of India, 47 
Lieutenant General Sir Eyre Coote, K. B. 

Commander-in-chief in India, 52 



Pag€ 

Prince Hyder Ally, of Mysore, 52 

Vixier Ally, Ex-nabob of Oude, 53 

Sir John Shore (Lord Teignmoutb) late 

Governor General of India, 54 

Sir W. H. Macnaghten, Baronet, Envoy at 

the Court of Cabul, • 56 

The Most Noble Richard, Marquis of Wel- 
lesley, K. P. K. G. D. C. L. and late 

Governor General of India, 59 

The Rev. William Hunter Ross, Chaplain 

of St. James's Church, 63 

Miss Mary Bird, • ib. 

Rev. N. Forsyth, Minister in the Dutch 

Church at Chinsurah, • 66 

Rev. Charles Piffard, late of the London 

Missionary Society, 67 

Rev. J. Keith, late of the London Mission- 
ary Society, • •.•... t^. 

Rev. R. DeRodt, late of the liondon Mis- 
sionary Society, • 68 

Augustus Cleveland, Esq. late of the Bengal 

Civil Service, 72 

Charles Short, Esq. many years Merchant 

in this city, 73 

Sir William Jones, Knight, one of the 
Judges of the Supreme Court of Judica- 
ture in Bengal, • •.. 79 

Charles Weston, Esq 94 

lieutenant-Colonel Robert Kyd, late Mili- 
tary Secretary to the Government of 

Bengal, 99 

John Adam, Esq. M. D. late Secretary to 

the Medical Board, Bengal, i^. 

Mr. Branch PUot P. G. Sinclair, 101 

William Fairlie Clark, Esq. Merchant ib. 

J. R. Hutchinson, Esq. late of the Civil 

Service, •••• •• t^. 

Mr. H. L. V. DeRozio, 103 

Mijor H. Conran, H. M. Service, ..•.•• 152 
Lieut. -Colonel George Ball, late Adjutant 

General of the Bengal Army, 184 

Peter Speke. Esq. late of the H. C. Bengal 

Civil Service, ib, 

T. D. Porcher, Esq. late of the H. C. Ben- 

gal CivU Service, l87 

W. P. Muston, Esq. Surgeon on the Bengal 

Establishment, ib. 

The Honorable F. J. Shore, late Commis- 
sioner of Sangor and the Nurbuddah 

Territories, 196 

Robert McClintock, Esq. Merchant, • • • . t^. 
W. A. Burke, Esq. M. D. late Inspector 
General of Hospitals of H. M. Forces in 
the East Indies, ib. 



VUl 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page 
Cudbert Thomhill, Esq. late Master At- 
tendant of the Port of Calcutta, 199 

J. R. Vo8, Esq. M. D. late Police Surgeon, 204 
N. J. Halhed, Esq. late Judge of the Court of 

Sudder Dewanny and Nizamut Adawlut, ib, 

Mrs. Elizabeth Turner, 212 

The Rev. John Chamberlain, late of the 

Baptist Mission, 213 

The Rev. John Lawson, late Minister of 

the Baptist Chapel in Circular Road, .. 215 
The Rev. James Penny, late of the Calcutta 

Benevolent Institution, 218 

Rev. W. H. Pearce, late Pastor of the Co- 

linga Chapel, 221 

Rev. W. Yates, D. D. of the Baptist Mis- 

sionary Society, 222 

Mr. Greorge Bryne of Chinsurah, • 228 

Deaths of W. T. Beeby, Esq. and the Rev. 

R. Gibson, ib, 

James Meik, Esq. late Senior Member of 

the Medl. Board in Bengal, 229 

The late William Lennox Cleland, Esq. 

Barrister of the Supreme Court, ib. 

Rev. John Adam, late Missionary of the 

London Missionary Society, 237 

Rev. G. B. Parsons, late Missionary at 

Monghyr, ib. 

The Rev. J. Macdonald, late of the Free 

Church Mission 239 

Mrs. Mary HiU, wife of the Rev. M. HiU, 

Acting Pastor of the Union Chapel, .... 240 
James Kyd, Esq. Ship Builder at Kidder- 

pore 242 

Captain A. B. Clapperton, late Master At- 

tendant of the Port of Calcutta, 243 

H. H. Spry, Esq. M.D. F.R.S.and F.G.S. 253 
Rev. Geo. Pickance, late Chaplain of the 

European Female Orphan Asylum,. ••• 260 
Rev. James Edmond, late Chaplain of the 

European Female Orphan Asylum, .... ib. 
Rev. Deocar Schmid, late Chaplain of the 

European Female Orphan Asylum, .... ib» 
Mr. David Hare, the friend of Native Edu- 
cation, 261 

The Rt. Honorable Charles Lord Metcalfe, 

Govr. Genl. of India, 262 

The late John Palmer, Esq. Merchant.. . . . 266 
Major General Claude Martin, Founder of 

the La Martiniere, 269 

Major Greneral Foster Walker, 276 

Mrs. Mary Fisher, wife of the Rev. Henry 

Fbher, ib. 

The Rev. Henry Fisher, late Senior Chap- 
lain at the Presidency of Bengal, 277 

The Affghan Massacre, or Tablet to the offi- 
cers and men of the 44th Regiment,. . . . 297 
Monument to the officers and men of the 53d 

Foot, who fell at Subraon and Alliwal, &c. ib. 
Memorial to the Heroes of Affghanistan, . . 298 
Major General Sir Robert Sale, the Hero of 

Jellalabad, ib. 

Major General Sir John McCaskill, K.C.B. 301 
Lord Keane (Baron Keane, of Gnznee in 

Affghanistan,) ib. 

Major General Sir William Nott, G.C.B.. . 302 
The Rev. Dr. Kennedy, late Vicar General 

of Bengal, and Principal of St. John's 

College, 303 



Page 

The Very Rev. Dr. Rabascall, V.G.B 303 

John Barretto, Esq. Merchant, 304 

Mr. Charles Cornelius, Senior Uncovenant- 
ed Assistant in the late Board of Trade 

office, 306 

Catchick Arakiel, Esq. an Armenian Mer- 
chant of the first rank and eminence in 

Calcutta, 311 

Hadjee Alexios Argyree, the first eminent 

Greek who settled in Calcutta. 313 

William Roxburgh, Esq. M.D.F.L.S. and 
S.A. late Superintendent of the Botanical 
Garden of the Hon. Company in Bengal, 317 
Mrs. Ann Thomas, wife of the Rev. J. Tho- 
mas of the Baptist Mission, 318 

Major E. DeArcy Todd, K.L.S. late Politi- 
cal Agent, Herat, 323 

Brigadier Sir A. Macleod, K.C.B. late Com- 
mandant of Artillery, 324 

Major Arthur William Fitzroy Somerset, 
late Military Secretary to Sir Henry Har- 

dinge. Governor General, 329 

Major General Sir Alexander Knox, K.C.B. 331 
The Rev. William Carey, D.D. the father 

of Missions in Bengal, 334 

The Rev. Joshua Marshman, D.D. of Se- 

rampore, r . . 340 

The Rev. William Ward, of Serampore, . . 343 

Mrs. Hannah Marshman, 345 

TheUteMr. Felix Carey, 349 

The late Mr. Boeck, Governor of the settle- 
ment of Serampore, 350 

Mrs. Mundy, wife of the Rev. G. Mundy, of 

Chinsurah, 353 

Mrs. Herklots of Chinsurah, ib. 

Major General Sir J. W. Adams, G.C.B.. . 356 
Major Greneral Sir J. R. Lumley, late Ad- 
jutant Greneral of the Army, 359 

Lieutenant- Colonel Harry Stark of the Ben- 
gal Horse Artillery, 361 

Major General Sir Jno. Horseford, K.C.B. 363 

The Rev. J. T. Reichardt 364 

Lieutenant P. B. Burlton, late of the Bengal 

ArtjUery, 375 

Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Taylor of the 

Engineers, 378 

Rev. W. Moore, of Bhaugulpore,* 385 

Major Chas. Hay Campbell, late of the 

Bengal Artillery,. ib. 

J. S. Barwise, Esq. late of Furreedabad, .. 387 
The late Messrs. Uilkison, Logan and Craw- 
ford, Indigo Planters, 388 

Monument to tiie Memory of the men, wo- 
men and children who were killed by the 

fall of the Barracks at Loodianah, 389 

Lieutenant-Colonel C. J. Doveton, of the 

38th Regiment, 392 

Captain David RuddeU, late of the Bengal 

Army, 395 

Captain G. H. M. Dalby, late Assistant 
Secretary to Government in the Military 

Department, 395 

Colonel T. D. Stenart, late of the let Regt. 

of Lt. Cavalry, 396 

Commodore Sir John Hayes, Kt. Senior 
officer of the Indian Navy and Master 
Attendant at Calcutta, ib. 



TABLE OP CONTENTS. 



INSCRIPTIONS TAKEN FROM MONUMENTAL TABLETS. 



Page 

St. John's Presy. Church, 1 

The Old, or Mission Church, 34 

St. Paul's Cathedral, .... 56 
St. Peter's Church, Fort 

William 62 

St. James' Church, 63 

St. Thomas' Church, Free 

School, ib» 

St. Stephen's Church, Kid- 

derpore, 65 

Orphan Burial Ground at 

Kidderpore, 66 

The Union Chapel, ib. 

St. Andrew's Kirk, 68 

The South Park Street Bu- 

rial Ground,. 69 

The North Park Street Bu- 
rial Ground 177 

TheMissionBurial Ground, 208 
The Baptist Chapel, Circu- 
lar Road 213 

The Benevolent Institution, 
Scotch and Dissenters' Bu- 
rial Ground, 225 

The Military Burial Ground, 244 
The European Female Orp- 
han Asylum Chapel, . . 260 
Christ's Church, Simlah, 261 
Hindoo College Square, . . ib» 

Hindoo College, ib. 

Hare's School, ib. 

Medical College, 262 

Native HospiUl, ib, 

Comwallis Statue, Town- 

HaU, ". 265 

Ochterlony Column, • • • • 268 

Bentinck Statue, 266 

Bust of the late Charles 

Beckett Greenlaw, .... ib. 
Bust of the late Major Genl. 

Sir Wm. Casement, . . 268 
Statue of the Marquis 

of Hastings, Tank Sqr. 268 
Statue of Sir Ed. Hyde 

East, Bart, Sup. Court. 269 

La Martiniere, 269 

The New Burial Ground, .. 271 

Roman Catholic Cathedral, 302 
Roman Catholic Church in 

Boitaconah, 307 

Portuguese Burial Ground, 

at Boitaconah, 309 

Roman Catholic Church in 

Dhurmtollah, 310 

Roman Catholic Church of 

St. Thomas,' ib. 

Armenian Church, • ib. 

The Greek Church, 313 



Page 
Armenian Philanthropic 

Academy, 313 

The French Burial Ground, 

Park Street, 314 

Bishop's College Burial 

Ground, 315 

Hon . Co. 's BotanicalGarden, 316 

Garden Reach Dispensary, ib. 

Sulkeah Burial Ground,.. 318 
St. Thomas' Church, How- 

rah 319 

Howrah Burial Ground, • • ib. 

Augurparah Orphanage, • • 322 
St. Stephen's Church,Dum 

Dum, 322 

Dum Dum Column, • • • • 325 

Dum Dum Burial Grounds, 326 

Barrackpore Cenotaphs, . • 328 

Barrackpore Church, .... 329 

Barrackpore Burial Ground, 330 

Danish Church, Serampore, 34 6 

Danish Burial Ground Ditto, ib. 

Mission Burial Ground Do. 347 

Pultah Burial Ground, .• 350 

Chandemagore, ib. 

Chinsurah, 353 

Subathoo, 356 

Gya, 358 

Ferozepore, 359 

Chunar, 360 

Cawnpore, • 361 

Kussowlee, 363 

Bhaugulpore, 364 

Goruckpore, 365 

Monghyr, 366 

Bandel, .369 

Chirra Poonjie, ib. 

Landour, • ib. 

Bundlekund, • . . • ib, 

Grazeepore, • ib. 

Rajpootannah, 370 

Hyderabad, ib. 

Hameerpore, ib. 

Hazareebaug, ib. 

Kishnaghur, ib. 

Bongong, ..' 371 

Goalpan^, ib. 

Simhih Hills, t^. 

Lucknow, ib, 

Mymensing, 372 

Malda, ib. 

Sultangunge factory, . . . • ib, 

Tumlook, ib. 

Shajehanpore, > • . • • t^. 

Singapore, ib. 

Goomsoor, 373 

Sonamooky, ib, 

Sylhet, ib. 



Page 

Rungpore, 373 

Patna, 374 

Pumeah, , • • ib» 

Nusserabad, ib, 

Nunklow, (Assam.). . • • . • 375 

Dibrooghur, (Do.) 376 

Upper Assam, • • 377 

Allyghur, •••• t^. 

Arracan, ib. 

Akyab 378 

Agra, • ib. 

Arrah 379 

Azimghur, ••..«•••••• ib. 

Allahabad, •• ib. 

Almorah, • ib. 

Burdwan, 380 

Beerbhoom, t^. 

Bogwangolah, ib. 

Burresaul, ib. 

Dacca, 381 

Berhampore, • • . • ib. 

Banda, 382 

Barreilly, t^. 

Benares, ib. 

Buxar, 383 

Cossimbazar, ib. 

Chuprah, ib. 

Chittagong, ib. 

Cuttack, t^. 

Dinapore, 384 

Deyrah Dhoon, 385 

Etawah, ib. 

Futtyghur, •• • ib. 

Futtehpore, 386 

Furreedpore, t^. 

JuUunder, ib. 

Juanpore, t^. 

Jessore, • 387 

Jumaulpore, • 388 

Kyouk Phyoo, t^. 

Loodianah, t^. 

Meerut, 390 

Midnapore, 391 

Mullye 392 

Mooradabad, ib. 

Mirzapore, •••••.. t^. 

Moulmein, 393 

Mhow, ib. 

fwedgeree, ...•••.•••.... • w. 

Tirhoot, ib. 

Saugor, 394 

Shiraz, 395 

Octacamund, t^. 

Neemuch, 396 

Coco's Island, t^. 

Darjeeling, 397 

Umballah, ib. 



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THE NEW YORK 

POBUC LIBRARY 

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vi PREFACE. 

genius in the youthful breast. " SUte viator, heroem calcaa,** has awakened ardour in 
the minds of all who have perused the tablet. How much more then is not a memoir 
of the great actions of illutrious men, in every department of usefulness, calculated to 
arouse attention and induce the like endeavour. 

It is utterly impossible to trace back the period when Monuments and Monumental 
Inscriptions were first adopted to commemorate the acts and actions of illustrious men. 
It is certain, however, that for all the ends and purposes enumerated. Monuments existed 
both in ancient as well as modem times. To us it appears, and we have the testi- 
mony of Holy Writ on this head, that their first origin may be traced as far back as 
the Universal Deluge, when the Rainbow was made, or selected, a standing token of the 
most awful judgment inflicted on a guilty world for its consummate wickedness, as well 
as a memorial of the subsequent love and pity displayed by the offended Deity after hifl 
divine justice has been satisfied. 

Although it is not in the power of all to command splendid Monuments, or rich 
Inscriptions, over the remains of their departed friends and relatives, yet they may 
be able to take effectual measures for securing those remains from premature decay, 
mutilations, or insult, by proper sepulture ; and it is remarkable, that it is in those 
communities only which are the most deeply impressed with that article of our faith 
the " Resurrection of the hodxf^ that any real care is evinced in this respect . 

It would be an unpardonable inadvertence were we to omit the mention of our 
grateful thanks to Gentlemen here, and in the Mofussil, by whose generous contri- 
butions our Obituary has been enriched, and who have helped us, with a friendly 
hand, to bring this compilation to a close — ^the aid they have afforded being a sure 
testimony of the interest they themselves have taken in the work we originally 
projected. 

The Obituary comprehends events connected with a long series of years ; viz. from 
the first formation of the British settlement to the present time ; and includes a great 
number of Monumental Inscriptions, Memoirs and short Obituary Sketches. To the 
candour of a generous public, the Compilers submit their work, the first of a compre- 
hensive kind hitherto attempted in this country. The motives which prompted a 
publication on this plan cannot be wrong ; but if they have failed to reahze their ideas, 
it is only because it is easier to project than to execute — to know what is right, than to 
be able to perform it. Every endeavour has been made to insure success, and no source 
of information has been left unexplored, or expense spared, in obtaining it, so as to 
render the work acceptable to subscribers. The Compilers, therefore, indulge the hope 
of a liberal patronage, which, if it be commensurate to the expenses incurred, vdll 
encourage them to offer a second volume by way of continuation, the collection of 
materials for the same being under course of arrangement, if the favor shown to the 
first attempt warrants a prosecution of the labour. 



THE 



BENGAL OBITUARY 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

The first stone of this handsome edifice* was laid on Tuesday the 6th day of April, 1784, on the 
morning of which Mr. Whaler, then acting President, proceeded from the old Court House attended by 
the chief officers of State and the principal inhabitants of Calcutta, to the ground upon which the sacred 
edifice was to be erected. The first stone was laid by Mr. Wheler with the usual ceremonies ; a Prayer 
was read on the occasion by the Rev. W. Johnson, Senior Chaplain, and a plate of Copper was inserted 
in the Stone, bearing the following Inscription : — 

The must stone op this Sacred Building, 

Raised uy the liberal and voluntary 

SuDSCRiPTioN OP British Subjects, 

AND others, 

was laid under the auspicp^ op 

The Honorable Wauren Hastings, Esq. 

Governor General of India, 

ON the 6th day of April, 1784 ; 

AND IN THE 13x11 YEAH OF HIS GOVERNMENT. 

It may be raRntioned as an instance of the comparatively high remuneration awarded to European skill 
sixty years ago, that the English engraver charged 232 Rupees for his work. 

Lieut. Agg, of the Engineers, had the entire construction of the building ; it was completed by a 
design furnished by himself. There is some difficulty in ascertaining the exact cost of the church ; 
upwards of a lac and a half of Rupees appear to have been expended upon it up to April 1787, exclu- 
sive of the remuneration to the Architect, which was Sa. Rs. 22,793, being 15 per cent, on the amount 
expended. Nearly the whole of this sum [with the exception of the grant from tlie Court of Directors 
of jf 1, 200, and 14,000 Rs. granted by the Government] was raised by voluntary contributions. 

On the 24th of June 1787 the church was consecrated and dedicated to St. John, by a special act of 
consecration sent out by the Primate, the Rev. William Johnson and tlie Rev. Thomas Blanshard, were 
chaplains. The Governor General, Earl Comwallis, attended, with all tlie principal officers of the State, 
and during the Anthem a collection was made for the benefit of the Charity School, amounting to 
Sicca Rupees 3,943-3. 

Sir John Zoffany bestowed on the Church that admiral)le altar])iece painted by him, representing 
"The Last Supper.'* It was proposed by the Rev. W. Johnson, and Cudbert Thornhill, Esq. as Sir 
John Zoffany was about to leave Calcutta, to present him with a Ring of 5,000 Rs. value, in considera- 
tion of this signal exertion of his eminent talents. The low state of their funds prevented other members 
of the Coinniittee from supporting the motion of Messrs. Johnson and Thornhill ; but they unanimously 
agreed in sending Sir John Zoffany an honorable written testimonial of the respect in which they held his 
great abiliti<», as an artist. From their liandsome and appropriate letter the following is a paragraph : — 

'* We sliould do a violence to your delicacy, were we to express, or endeavour to express, in such terms 
as the occa'iion calls for, our sense of the favour you have conferred on the settlement by presenting" to their 
phice of worship, so capital a painlifjj? that it would aduru the first church in Europe, and should excite iu 
the breasts of its spectators those senUinents of virtue and piety so happily pourtrayed in the figures." 



Sorth Gallery. 

St. John's Church, 

Founded and consecrated 

under the auspices 

of the Most Noble 

Marquis Cornwallis, 

A. D. 1787. 



South Gallery. 

St. John's Church, 

Enlarged and improved 

under the auspices 
of the Right Honorable 
Lord iMinto, 
A. D. 1811. 



liord Minto, who was appointed Governor General of India on the 31st of July 1807, died suddenly 
the 21st of June 181 4, at Stevenage, about a month after his return to England from India. He was on 
his way to Scotland and had left London in a bad state of health. In the course of his illness he had no 
presentiment of approaching dissolution, and seemed only anxious to proceed on his journey and reach 
Minto as early as possible. In his domestic circle no man ever displayed a kinder heart or was ever 
more a&ffectionately beloved. 

* The first church erected in Calcutta (also called St. John's), stood at the western extremity of whnt is 
now known as Writers* Buildings ; it was destroyed at the capture of Calcutta by Suraj-ud-Dowla in 1756, 
oiler it had been in use for about 40 years. 



2 ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

Lord Mtnto ia the author of a number of beautiful little poemn, " The Minto Vision/' descriptive of 
the romantic seat of his ancestors, and is a production of high merit. 

Every man who is proud of contemplating examples of private munificenoe, will acknowledge with 
pleasure the feeling and generosity of this illustrious person, who was resolved at his own exi>ense to 
erect a Cenota]ih at Barrackpore to the memory of those brave oflQcers and men who fell gloriously in 
the conquest of Bourbon, Mauritius and Java. 

It was during Ix>rd Minto's administration in India, that St. John's Church was enlarged and im- 
proved at the expense of Government. 

" Thy name revered through India's distant clime 
Shall live triumphaat o*er the wrecks of time." 



Governor— JOB CHXRSOCK,— (The Founder of Calcutta.) 

Mr. Chamock was the first Englishman who made a conspicuous figure in the political theatre of 
India. He was the founder of the British Settlement of Calcutta ; and may be said to have laid the 
first stone of the mighty fabric of our Indian Empire. 

When peace was established between the great Emperor Aurungzebe and the English Company, Job 
Chamock, the Company's Chief at Hooghly, twice removed the factory, and in the year 1CH9-90, 
finally formed an English Settlement at Calcutta, which ere one century terminated^ b^»me a mighty 
city---the magazine of trade — ^the arbitress of kingdoms — and the seat of empire. 

Mr. Orme says, ** Mr. Chamock was a man of courage, without military experience ; but impatient 
to take revenge on a Government, from which he had personally received the most ignominious treat- 
ment, having been imprisoned and scourged by the nabob." 

The sense of such an indignity was, doubtless, deeply rooted in the mind of Chamock, and, perhaps, 
was one of the reasons for the severe usage of the natives, ascribed to him by Captain Hamilton. 

Before, or about the year 1678-79, Mr. Chamock, smitten with the charms of a young and beautiful 
Hindu, who decked with her most pompous ornaments, and arrayed in her fairest drapery, was at the 
point of sacrificing an innocent life, of (perhaps) fifteen summers on the altar of Paganism, directed hi.s 
guards to seize the half-unwilling victim ; the obedient guards rescued her from an untimely death, and 
Chamock softly conducted her to his house. They lived together many years. She bore to him several 
children, and dying shortly after the foundation of his new dty, was entered at the Mausoleum, which 
to tins day stands entire, and is the oldest piece of masonry in Calcutta. 

If we are to credit Captain Hamilton (who had the story from existing authorities) his sorrow for tlie 
loss of this lady was unbounded, and the public method be took of avowing his love, was carried to an 
unusual though innocent excess. So long as he lived, he, on the anniversary day of her death, sacrificed 
a Fowl in her Mausoleum, We now, through the vale of time, cannot trace his reasons for this extra- 
ordinary ceremony. We refer the reader to the Epitaphs for further information respecting Chamock's 
family and connections in India. 

From an oral tradition still prevalent among the natives at Barrackpore (now an established Military 
Cantonment, fourteen miles distant from Calcutta)* we learn that Mr. Chamock built a bungalow there, 
and a flourishing Bazar arose under his patronage, before the settlement of Calcutta had been determined 
on. Barrackpore is at this day best known to the natives by the old name of Chanock^ and Captain 
Hamilton, misled by their method of pronunciation, invariably writes the name without the letter r. 

Governor Job Chamock died on the 10th of January, 1692 ; and if the dead knew any of the living, 
and could behold with mortal feelings this sublunary world, with what sensation would the Father of 
Calcutta glow to look down this day upon his city ? 

The following is the Inscription taken from his monument situated on the north of the church. 



D. O. M. 

Jobns Chmmock, Armiger 

Anglus et nup. in hoc. 

regno. Bengalensi. dignissim' Anglorum 

Agens Mortalitatis suae exuvias 

sub hoc marmore deposuit, ut 

in spe beatffi resurrectionis ad 

Christ! judicis adventum obdormirent. 



Qui postquam in solo non 

suo peregriiiatus esset din, 

reversus est donium suae a^ter 

nitatis decimo die lOih .lanuarii 1692. 

Pariter Jacet 

Maria, lobi Primogenita, Carole Eyre Anglorum 

hicci Praefecti. Conjux cha'ijtsimu. 

Quae Obiit 19 die Februarii A. D. 1696*97. 



Brfore the commencement of the year 1802, the Tombe in the Cemetery qf Calcutta had fallen into 
a state qf irreparable decay, and to prevent any dangerous accident, which the tottering ruins threat ^ 
ened to such as approached them, it was deemed necessary to pfill dotcn most of them and clear the 
Burial Ground which had long been out of use , only leaping those tombs of which the Inscriptions were 
legible, and the Sepulchre of the Chamock Family, The stones and marble tablets were carefully 
cleared from the rubbish and laid at the base of Job Chamock*s Monument, where they are still to be 
seen in excellent preservation, the Inscriptions arc in raised letters, and are as fresh as when first cut. 



Here lies interred the body Qf 
Cai^tain Henry Burton, 

late Commander of the Ship Lttyal Captain, from 
Fort St. George, who departed this life 
on the 25th of December. Anno Domini 1693, 
Aged 42 Years 5 Months and 16 Days. I 



Here lii'S interred the bo<ly of 
Elizabeth Mabbe, 
wife of Capt. John iMabbe, Mariner, who 
departed this life 
the 19lh of May 1699, 
in the 23rd ycur of her Age. 



• The English Cantonment at Barrackpore was formed in the year 1775, and the first bungalow was 
buih there iu the month of February, about 150 yards from where the flag-staff now stands. 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 



Hie Jtcct 
Oatherina IKThite, 



Domi Jonathanis White, uxor dilectissima et 
Tod Moffocrou lobi Charaock 
filia Natu miniina: 
que primo in partu et ^Etatis flore 
Annum Af^eua unum de vigrenti. 
Mortem Obijt heu ! iromaturam 21 Jaauarii 1700, 
Siste parumper, Christiane Lector, 
(vel quisquises tandem )ct mecumdefle 
Duram sexus muliebris sortcm 
qui per elapsa tot anoram millia 
culpam prim' ^vte luit Parentis, 
ct luet usque dum eternum stabit 
In dolore paries filios. — GeneUt iii. 16. 
In Memoriam 
Jonathanis IVhite, Angli, 
et in rebus An^iorum administrandis in hoc 

Bengals Regno olim secundi ^ 

qui ano sua; peregrinationis trigessuno et 

quarto ab nine in spternas 

migravit dumos vigcssimo tertio die 

Jaiiuarij Anno Domiui 1703. 

Id piam memoriam 

Marg^aritn Adams. 

Rev. Domni Benjiroanis A damn, 

ecclesia! Christi in Bengaia Pastoris 

Dilect2B olim conjugis. 

Obijt Decimo 3 tio Calendorum 

Septembris Anno Domini 1703. 



Mors janua vits plorum nitamur exemplis 
doctorumque serraonibus : per aiigu»ta enira est via 
quae ad vitam ducit ct j)anciqui iaveaiunt. — Matt, 

vii. 14. 



Here Tyes interred the body of 
Samuel Jon^s, 

Son of Captain Samuel Jones of I^ondon, 
who dyed Purser of the Ship Dutchess, June 19, 

1704. 



Here lyes the bod yes of Francis 

Ailey. Thomas Ailey, and Richard 

Ooorlay, Obt. Au(r«t. the 19ih, Sept. 

the 5th, and 14th, 1708. Francis, aged 

3 years and 3 months ; Thomas 5 years, 

and Richard 18 mouths. 



Here lyes interred the body of 

Richard Gary, 

Merchant, who departed this life 

the 15ih November, Anno Doniiui 1708, 

In the thirty-fifth-year of his age. 






Ralph Sheldon, Armiger ct illustris shcldoniuni 

stematis baud indigna Proles. Mortalitatis sua* 

cxuvis in spe beats resurrectionis, sub hoc tuniulo 

dei>osuit Aprilis2e>, 1709, .litat 37. 



Gilbert Sheldon, who succeeded Juxon as Archbishop of Canterbury in 1663, was remarkable for his 
devoted attachment to Charles Ist and for the munificent support which he afforded to the advancement 
of learning in the University of Oxford. His elder brother was Ralph Sheldon the representative of the 
family, which is of ancient descent in Staffordshire. 

Here lyelh interr'd the body of 
Capt. Christopher Cradock, 

who departed this life the 30th of July 1714, 
In the 33rd year of his uge. 



A plain slab in the Chamock mausoleum bears the following Inscription to the memory of Dr. 
Hamilton, to whose professional talents our nation was so deeply indebted in the beginning of our 
eventful career in India. 



Und er thw stone lyes interred the body of 

lXrillian& Hamilton, Surgeon, 

who departed this life the 4ih Dec. 1717. 

His memory ought to be dear to this 

natiou, for the credit he gain'd 

the English in curing Ferruckseer, 

the present king of Indostan, 
of a malignant distem|)er, by which 

he made his own name famous 
at the Court of that great monarch ; 

and without doubt will perpetuate 

his memory, as well in Great Britain, 

as all other nations in Europe. 



to 



Here lyes the body of 
Mary IVallis, 

Wife of Richard Wallis, 

who departed her life the 3d day 

of Aug. 1718, Aged 31 Years. 

Here lyeth the body of 
Slisabeth, 

late wife of Jonathan Cooper, 

and daughter of Capt. Henry Uurtuu, 

who departed this life the— day 

of March 1719, ^tatis 29. 



Williani liiresay, Merchant, 

after he had voyaged m these parts 

many years, an eminent supercargo, 

the general satisfaction of his employet^, 

and public good of trade ; rests here, 

(much lamented by those who knew him) 

B 2 



With his Wife Sarah and three children, viz. 

Hester, John and William, 

who were all born and departed this life 

according to the following account : 

Hester, Dyed 26 Aug. 1716. aged 2 Years, 5 Mas. 

John, Dyed 29th Aug. 1716. aged 4 Mns. 15 Days. 

Sarah, the Mother, Dyed in child- bed 

May the 20th 1718, Aged 25 Years, 2 Months; 

William was bom the 16th of May 1718, 

and Dyed the 27th of April 1719. 

Mr. William Livesay after sorrowing 

some time fur his said family, 

departed this life the 15th of November 1719, 

Aged 40 Years, 1 Month, 6 Days; 

being born on the 9th of October 1679. 



Here lyeth interred the body of 
Margery Jones, 

Daughter of Mr. Tieorge Croke. Merchant, 

lorinerly of Council in this place. 

She was niarry'd in Fort St. George, to 

Captain John Jones, the 23d of October, Anno 1711, 

who afterward being appointed 

Master Attendant for this settlement. 

She died here the 25th April 1723, 

Aged 30 Years, 1 Day. 



Here Lyeth interred the body of 
Petsr Markland. 

a Factor in the Hon. Comp. s Service, 
who departed this life 1725. 
To his memory this Tomb is erected by Capt. 
Richd. Gosfright, commander oi the Fordwick. 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 



Here Lyes iQlerrM the body of 
Cnptain Imtac I>^arenney 

^'ho de]iarted this lile the 24th October 1730, 
ill Uic 37tU Year of his Age> 



HicjaccDt Mortales exuvsB 
Slixabethse Barrwel, 

8cd parcis invitis Deo cui omnia 
vivunt virtulibus et mentis aucta 

vivat ilia Willelmi liarrwel, 

dilcctissima conjux ipsum maxime 

cognatus amices que omoes inenoda 

bili dolore affectos Ilelioquena 

extreraum vits spiritum edidiit 

die 25 Septembris 17dl| jElatis suae 22. 



Hie in spe bcntitudinis Christi recumbunt cinercs 

Dominx Marthee Orme, 

vidurc Reverendo Roberto Orme, decesso, 

saDCiilate in Deura et lienif^-nitate in omnes 

Prajclnra fuit 

Fpiritum ngrebnt supremuni IV. die Februarij 

Anno Redemplionis M DCCXXXV. iElatis sus 

LXVir. 

Hie eliam rcquiescuut cineres 

Domina} liouiaee Teresse Meredith, Filis 

predicta; Marths et Roberti Orme Felicissime 

nupta fuit lacobo Meredith, bujus loci 

incoiie, cui semper in omnibus hujus vitas 

actionibus carissinia fuit Pietate et ^•anctilate 

beatffi matris praedita fuit, bona sua 

indoles sinf^ularisque benignitatis 

cum pura castaque mente iuncta 

Gratam Omnibus Reddiderunt 

supremum Obijt XH. diem Septembris 

Anno Christi MDCCXLI. .Etatis sus XXVII. 



Here lyeih the Body of 

Oharles Besrdy Esq. 

who departed this life the 90th December, A iino 1747, 

Aged 49 Years. He was soa of John Beard, Esq. 

formerly preaideot of this Place. 



Virtus post fuDera Vivit. 
This Monument was erected in Memory of 

Martha Eyles, 

Daughter of Sir John VViUeurong, Bart. 

and Relict of John Gumley, Esq. 

who died Chief of Dacca in January 1742-3, 

After being again Married a short time 

to Edward Eyies, Esq. of Council at Fort William ; 

she concluded this life with a 

becoming resignation the 21st August 1748, 

being well esteemed and much regretted 

by those who were acquainted with 

her engraging qualifications and personal merit 



Here lyejh interred the body of 

Mrs. Sarah Bonrchier; 

she departed this life on the 12lh day 

of February 1738-9, aged 35 Years, 

7 Months and 18 Days. 



Here lyeth interred the bodies of 
Jonathan Snuo^, Senior, 
who departed this lite Sept. 4th, 1745, Aged 48 ; 

Jonathan Smart, Junior, his son, 
who departed tliis life September 8th, 1747, aged 25. 



Here lyeth interred the body of 

Ca))tain Qeorg^e Gk>rinc^, 

third son of Sir Harry Coring, Bart, who departed 

this hfe the llth November 1750, Aged 40. 



Here lyeth interred the body of 

Mr. James Ross, of Calcutta, Merchant ; 

who departed this life October 7, 1751, 

In the 45th year of his Age. 

With equal pace imj[)artial fate, 

Knocks at the Palace and the Cottage gate ; 

Nor should our sum of life extend 

Our growing hopes beyond their destined end. 

Inscribed to the Memory of her tender and dear 

husband ; by Johannah Ross, 



Here lyeth the body of 

Mrs. Jane Sniart, 

Relict of Mr. Jonatiian Smart, who departed tlits life 

the lOih September, Anno 1753, Aged 50 years. 



Hie Jacet 
Anna Moore, 

Obiit prime die Dcccnibris, Anno Domiiu 

MDCCXL. 

Pulchritude et omnes virtutes 

in Ilia dilectissime juncta: fuerunt, 

Beatas I lie qui talem tenet 

Uxorem beati»simus eram dum vixit. 

O Lector meum perpeude damnum ettunc dice 

quern inter homines putas miseriinum. 

Beauty doth lay interred beneath this stone. 

And every virtue sweetly ioined in one. 

Bless'd was the nmn possess u of such a wife : 

Most bless'd was 1, wlide Cod preserved her life. 

'J'hink what Tve lost, kind reader, tell me then 

Who in the World is wretchedcst of men. 



Here Lye 

the remains of iSIrs. Jane Douf^las, 

Aged 28 Years, 

who departed this life the 7th November 1755, 

to the lasting atiliction 

of all who were happy in the knowledge of her many 

good, sensible and amiable qualities : 

By her lies deposited the body of her daughter 
Helen Douglas. 
who deceased prior tu her Mother, 
the 22<1 June, 1755, Aged 3 Years, 
to whose beloved Memories this Monument is erect- 
ed by their afHicted and afl'ectiouate husband 
and father, Mr. Charles Douglas, 
Third son ol Sir \Vm. Douglas of Kelhead, Bart. 



Here lyes the 
Body of IVilliam Speke, 

Aged 18 : Son of II y. Speke, Esq. 
Captain of His Majeiity's Ship Kent, 

He lost his leg and life in that ship 
At the capture of Fort Orleans, 
the 24th of March, Anno 1757. 

(This Monument U yet standing. J 



Here lies interred the 
Body of Charles IVatson, Esq. 

Vice Admiral of Uie White, 

Commander-in chief of His Maiesty's 

Nuvul Forces in the East Indies, 

who departed this life the 16th day of August, 1757, 

In the 44th year of his Age. 

Geritth taken February 13th, 1756. 

Calcutta freed January llth, 1757. 

Chandernagore taken March 23d, 1757. 

Excgit Monumeutuni a^re pcrennius. — S. O. Fd. 



Amonfffii the modem Tombs it the one 
died in the full tide o/mccess. 



now standing over the remains of Admiral Watson, who 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 



Uoderoeath this Stone lyeth the remains of 
Charlotte Becher, 

the afTt'Ctionate Wife of Richard Becher, £sa. 

In the East India Comp/s Service in Uengal. 

She died the 14th day of October in the year 

of our Lord 1759, in the 21st 

year of her age ; aiter sufferingr 

with patience a long illness occasioned by grief for 

the death ot an only daughter, 
who departed this Ufe at Fultah the SOth day of 

November 1756. 
IVis Monument is erected to her memory, by her 
* afflicted iiusband. 



Here lietli the body of 

Jane Martin, 

Wife of Lieut.-Col. Fleming Martin, 

who died the 15ih day of Sept. 1766, Aged 35 Years. 

Here lies interred the body of 
Mrs. Frances Rnmbold, 

wife of Thomas Rumbold, Esq. who departed 

this life in child-bed, August 22d, 1764, Aged 26. 

'i'his Monument is erected in raemorv of the 

many virlues she possessed and which made 

her truly amiable in the several relations of 

tt child, a wife, a parent, and a fnend. 



Here lyeth the Body of 
Mrs. Sleanor IVinwrood, 

late Wife of Major Ralph 
Winwood, who departed this life on 
the 22d day of September 1766, Aged 22 Vcars. 
Requiescat in pace. 
C This Tomi remains HuHding.) 



Here lyelh interred 
Mits. Slisabeth Reed, 

late wife of John Reed, Esq. 

who departed this hfe on the 16th 

of September, 1767, in the 26th Year 

of her Age ; one who adorned the amiable 

virtues of a dutiful child, a sincere and loving wife, 

a tender affectionate parent, 

a kind relation and true friend ; 

a humane mistress, and a real 

Well-wisher to all her felluw-creatures. 

Here also is interred 

her infant son, who died 

the 17th of November following. 

Aged one Month and 27 Days. 

CThis Tombremaim ttanding.) 



The large cenotaph at the North Angle of the Church was erected to the memory of the officers who 
fell in the Rohilla campaign, but strange to sag, bears no Inscription whatever^ neither is there any 
reference to the memorial in the records of the church. 

MRS. FRANCES JOHNSON— frAi? oldest British Resident in Calcutta.) 

Died on the 3rd February, at her late dwelling house, to the Northward of the Old Fort, Calcutta, the 
venerable Mrs. Frances Johnson, in the 87th year of her age, the oldest British resident in Calcutta. This 
lady was the second daughter of Edward Crook, Esq. of Herefordshire, Grovemor of Fort St. David, on 
the coast of Coromandel, and was bom on the 10th of April 1728. Mr. Crook, previously to his return 
from India, was offered the Government of Fort St. George, but declined the appointment, on account 
of his age and infirm health, and returned to his native country, where he was received with high respect 
by the Court of Directors of the East India Company. 

In 1738 Miss Frances Crook, in the 13th year of her age, married Parry Purple Templer, Esq. 
nephew to Mr. Braddyll, then Governor of Calcutta, by whom she had two children, both of whom 
died young. In about five years after her marriage, she was left a widow by the death of Mr. Templer. 
She married secondly, James Aitham, Esq. a CivU Servant on the Bengal Establishment. This second 
union was of short duration ; in twelve days after his marriage, Mr. Aitham died of the small-pox. 

Mrs. Aitham remained a widow for about two years, when she married William Watts, Esq., then 
senior Member of the Supreme Council, and subsequently appointed Governor of Calcutta ; but at the 
time his appointment reached India, he was on his return to England. In 1756, when Calcutta was 
taken by Suraj-ud-Dowlah, Mr. Watts was chief at Moorshedabad, and both he and Mrs. Watts were 
in that city at the time of the surrender of Fort William. The Nabob, elated by his momentary suc- 
cess, threatened destruction to every British subject, male and female. Mr. Watts and his family were 
placed in custody at Moorshedabad, to await the arrival of the Nabob ; but they were both favourites 
of the B^um, the mother of the Nabob, and to her friendship they were both indebted for tlieir pre- 
servation. On tins occasion, Mrs. Watts was placed under the same roof with the ladies of the Nabob's 
Court, by whom she was treated with the utmost delicacy, kindness and respect. At the expiration of 
thirty-seven days, and while the Nabob still continued in the vicinity of Calcutta, the Begum found a 
safe conveyance for Mrs. Watts, and sent her, under an escort, by water, to Chandemagor, where she 
was received with all possible hospitality and attention by M. Lauss, the French Governor. 

Her husband being still closely confined at Moorshedabad, Mrs. Watts addressed a memorial to her 
friend Uie Begum, entreating her kind offices for the release of her husband. The Begum possessed 
great ascendancy over her son, the Nabob, and at her intercession, he consented, though with great 
reluctance, to the release of Mr. Watts, who was thus safely restored to his family. 

Mrs. Watts had four children by her third husband, one of whom died in early infancy ; with the 
other three, namely, a boy and two girls, Mr. and Mrs. Watts, about the year 1760, returned to Eng- 
land, where the eldest girl, Amelia, a lady of great beauty and accomplishments, married the Right 
Honorable Charles Jenkinson, afterwards Earl of Liverpool. The second daughter married George 
Foyntz Ricketts, Esq. formerly Governor of Barbadoes. * 

Mr. Watts died in England ; and the state of his affairs in India, requiring the presence of his widow, 
Mrs. Watts returned to Bengal about the year 1769 ; and on the 1st of June, 1774, she gave her hand 
to the Reverend William Johnson, principal chaplain to the Presidency of Fort William, who returned to 
England in a few years after his marriage, and Mrs. Johnson continued ever since to reside in Calcutta, 
in a style of dignified hospitality. Her manners were cheerful, polished, and highly pleasing. She 
abounded in anecdote ; and possessing ease and affability of communication, her conversation was al- 
ways interesting, without any tendency to fatigue the hearer. She had a strong understanding, to which 
she superadded much and accurate observation. Her views of life were correct, and the benevolence of 
her heart and the warmth of her affections continued unimpaired to the latest period of her life. Though 



6 ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

prone to reflect and to discriminatei'yet her judgment did not abridge, but served to guide and exalt her 
benevolence. As a Christian, she was sound in her principles, and exemplified in her practice ; — in fine, 
her conduct in all the relations of life was such as to gain the universal respect and esteem of society. 

She continued to enjoy excellent health till a few weeks before her dissolution. 

Her remains were interred on Tuesday morning in the ground belonging to St. John's Chordi, 
where a spot of ground for a Cemetery had been allotted for the deceased during the Government of 
Lord Wellesley, northward of the Monument erected over the grave of Admiral Watson, N. W. angle 
of the Church yard. 

The funeral was attended by a numerous company, among whom were The Right Honourable the 
Governor General, in the state coach with six horses, and a detachment of the body guard ; The Hon- 
ourable Sir Henry Russell, the Honourable John Lumsden, Esq., &c. &c. 

The Monutnent over her grave iiill remains standing ^ and bears the following Inscription :— • 

Beneath 

are depodted the remains of 

Mrs. Frances Johnson | 

sbc was the second daughter of Edward Crook, Esq. 

Governor of Fort St. David, un the coast of Coromandel, 

and was burn the 10th of April, 1725. 

In 1738 she intermarried with Parry Purple Teropler, Esq., 

Nephew of Mr. Braddyll, then Governor of Calcutta, 

by whom she had two children, who died Infants. 

Her second husband was James Altharo, of Calcutta, Esq. 

who died of the small-pox a few days after the marriage. 

She next intermarried with William Watts, Esq. 
then Senior Member of the Supreme Council of Beugal, 
by whom she had issue four children, 
Ameha, who married I'he Hiffht Honourable 
Charles Jenkinson afterwards Earl of Liverpool, 
by whom she had issue one child, Robert Banks, now 
Earl of Liverpool, &c. &c. 
Edward, now of Hanslope Park, in the county of Bucks, Esq. 
Sophia, late the wife, and now the Widow of 
George Poyntz Ricketts. Esq. late Governor of Barbadoes, 
and William, who died an Infant. 
After the death of Mr. Watts, she in 1774, intermarried with the 
Reverend William Johnson, then principal chaplain of the Presidency of Fort William, 

by whom she had no issue. 

She died the 3a of February 1812. Aged 87, 

The oldest British reside it ia Bengtil, universally beloved, respected and revered.' 

Immediately trest of the Church are /bur plain monuments covering the remains of three Judges of 
the Supreme Cmrt, and Bishop Turner. 

SIR ROBERT HENRY BLOSSET, Kt.— (Late Chi^ Justice of the Supreme Court.) 

The death of this distinguished character took place about 9 o'clock on the evening of Saturday, the 
1st of February, 1823. He was interred the following evening in the ground belonging to St. John's 
church on the western side of the compound. 

Of Sir Henry Blosset's professional character we know but little ; but it cannot fail to be highly 
estimated, when we state, that short as the allotted time was since he first landed in India, (scarcely 
two months,) he had, in that brief period, impressed all the professional gentlemen of the Court with 
the most favourable opinion of his abilities as a lawyer, and his highly eminent character as a firm and 
impartial judge. In his private relations we know still less of Sir Henry Blosset ; but we have learnt 
from a private source, an account of his sublime and impressive death, which, of itself, is a sufficient 
pledge that his life was upright, just and honourable. A few hours only before his dissolution, having 
necessarily become acquainted with the dtmgerous nature of his case, he sent for his Medical attendants, 
intimating his wish to speak a few words to them in private. One of the Physicians in attendance, soon 
after this, approached his bed-side. Sir Henry, who then lay with his eyes clossed, took this gentle- 
man's hand, and telling him he was aware of his danger desired earnestly to know to how many hours 
his earthly duration might probably extend. His Physician answered, that painful as such a communi- 
cation must necessarily be, if he earnestly desired to know, he should but ill-discharge his duty if he 
withheld from him the true state of his case. 

He was then informed, that the circulation having ceased at the extremities, and his pulse being no 
longer sensible, many hours could not roll by before his dissolution came. He received this communi- 
cation with that composure which spoke his perfect preparation for the awfiil event ; and after returning 
his thanks in the most impressive manner, to his medical attendants and friends, for the care and atten- 
tion they had shown during his illness, he poured out his soul in fervent prayer, expressing the content 
and resignation with such he should render up his spirit to God who gave it, and imploring the blessing 
of Heaven on the Hindoo world ; trusting that the Almighty, in his own good time, would bring them 
to the knowledge of the true religion, and call them from darkness to light. After this last effort of 
piety, benignity and love, which proved his end to be in charity with all mankind, he died in peace, 
leaving an example of manly fortitude and holy resignation, as sublime in its nature as it must be 
consoling and beneficial in its influence. 

Sir R. H. Blosset descended from eminently pious parents, and his mother, who long survived her 
partner, imparted with the most unwearied diligence, the principles of genuine piety to all her children ; 
to her endeavours, success was granted through the divine blessing, in every instance. With r^ard to 
Sir Henry, it must be confessed, that the ensnaring influence of the world, at his first entrance into 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 



public life, did, for a little season, draw away hii heart from God ; but the principlefl which a mother 
gave him were never wholly eradicated from his breast ; and when, through the preaching of a faithful 
minister of the established Church in London, he was awakened from sin, they soon flourished with 
increased vigor. Being ashamed, yea, even, confounded, because he did bear the reproach of his youth, 
he fled witli repentance and faith to tlie Saviour's cross, from whence he never afterwards wandered. 

The University to which he belonged, is Oxford ; having flnished the usual course of education there, 
he chose for his profession the noble study of the law. With what plea.<ure do we add his name to that 
long list of distinguished lawyers, who have rendered splendid talents still more illustrious by extraordi- 
nary piety. 

Much need not be said in proof of his possessing great talents ; for the circumstance of his being 
appointed Chief Justice of this Province, shows how highly they were estimated by those in authority, 
and by aU who became arxjuainted with him. As a natursd consequence of such talents, improved by 
unwearied industry, and adorned by the most winning sweetness of manners, he rose gradually to the 
highest honours of his profession. It pleased God to crown his labours with abundant increase of riches, 
still further enlarged by the fortune of a relation which was bequeathed to him ; he however set not hi* 
heart upon these things ; his bounty was ever as profuse, as his means were large ; his thoughts were 
not for himself, but for others ; and remembering who was tlie giver of all, he rendered unto Him again, 
in acts of mercy and charity, a large portion of that which he had received. It is not surprising that to 
such a person every thing connected with the endeavour to spread the Redeemer's Gospel should be an 
object of interest, and that all such exertions should be encouraged by him to the utmost, and Societies, 
having that object, supported largely by his bounty. This they were indeed. Among the varied regions 
of tlie earth to which his attention was directed, as spots where Missionary exertions were making, none 
seemed so intensely interesting to him as India. He loved, he pitied, he prayed for the people of India. 
When therefore his appointment was oflfered to him, and an opening seemed to be made for his doing 
some good in that very land, so long the object of his attention and prayers, he did not hesitate to resign 
a very lucrative practice, and to quit forever, (as he himself presaged) his native country. Thus giving 
up for the benefit of others, that which he had acquired in England, he came hither for the puq)ose of 
doing good, by every means in his power ; and especially by using that influence, which his rank and 
fortune would give him to promote the spiritual, as well as the temporal welfare of the Hindoos. 

The interval of a sea voyage, to most persons tedious, and to some intolerable, was to him a refreshing 
season of enjoyment. Being now relieved from the cares and ceaseless hurry of business, he set himself 
to study more diligently than ever the Sacred Scriptures. This he managed to connect also with the 
study of Extern languages, in which he made so good a progress, that, (although labouring without a 
preceptor's aid, and at the moment of his leaving England quite ignorant of them) before he landed in 
India, he was well versed in Hindoostanee ; possessed a competent knowledge of Persian, and waa 
making considerable advances in Sanscrit. In Hindoostanee, indeed, he became the preceptor of others, 
who will long remember his condescension and ])atience in teaching them. With respect to European 
languages his knowledge was prodigious. He was perfect master of French, Italian, German, Latin, 
Greek, and had some knowledge of Spanish. With the sacred tongue (Hebrew) he was familiarly 
acquainted, and often spoke of it with delight. To all these attainments were added a profound, solid, 
knowledge of the Law, which alone is the labour of a life to many. Such is the man whom it pleased 
God to preserve safe through the dangers of the mighty deep, to bring him to the land where hia 
presence was most anxiously desired, and where he himself longed to be ; to give him just a sight of 
those things in which his heart rejoiced, and then, on a sudden, to call him into his own presence. 

The loss in this benighted land is irreparable. Where shall the man possessed of so many qualifica- 
tions be found to supply his place } These and a thousand other thoughts and questions are apt to 
spring up in our hearts ; but let us be still — and know that it is God who has done it, and that He 
doeth all things for the best. 

The following Imcripiiona are taken from (he monumenU^ viz. 



Sir Robert Henry Blosset, 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, 
Beugal ; 
Died 1st February 1823 ^Etat 47 

Sir Christopher Fnller, 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, 

Bengal ; 

Died 26th May 1824, ^tat 50. 



Sir Benjamin Heath Malkin, Knight, 
one uf the Judges of the Supreme Court 
of Judicature, 
Died 21st of October 1837, ii:tat 40. 

The Right Revd. 
John Mathias Turner, D.D. 
Lord Bishop of Calcutta, 
Died 7ih July 1831, aged 45. 



THOMAS FANSHAW MIDDLETON— (^frW Protestant Bishop and Metropolitan of all India.) 

Thomas Fanshaw Middleton, was the only son of the Rev. Thomas Middleton, Rector of Kedleston 
in Derbyshire, and was bom at that village on the 26th of January, 1769. His mother Elizabath, was 
the daughter of John Bott, Esq. of Burton upon Trent. The first rudiments of knowledge were incul- 
cated by his father, a man of learning and respectability. On the 21st April 1779, the subject of our 
memoir was admitted into Christ Hospital, where he was distinguished for serious reflection and steadi- 
ness of conduct. The advantages of education there lilierally bestowed were acknowledged with grati- 
tude by Mr. Middleton in his progress through life. Even when engaged in the arduous duties of his 
Bishopric in India? he remembered with feelings of filial regard the place where he had received so much 
benefit. Being desirous to express the sincerity of his thankfulness more strongly than by words, he, in 
the year 1821, transmitted to Christ's Hospital, a donation of four hundred Pounds, and shortly after 
he was elected a Governor of that excellent Institution. 

From school, he was admitted into Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, where his habits were studious and 
his companions literary. He took the degree of B. A. in January 1 792, being in the scale of honors, 



8 ST. JOHN'S church: 

fourth of the senior Optimi ; and in March following, having been ordained Deacon by the Bi«hdp of 
Lincoln, he entered on the duties of the Church, as Curate of the Pariah of Grainitborough m Lincoln- 
Bhire. Here he conducted a small periodical work, called " The Country Spectator,'' which existed 
only eight months. His reputation as a Clergyman and a scholar, introduced him to tlie notice of Dr. 
Jolui Pretyman, Archdeacon and a Preceptor of Lincoln, and brother of the Bishop, who in the year 
1794, entruHted him with the education of his two sons. 

In 1795 the father of his pupils presented him to the Rectory of Tensor in Northamptonshire. His 
mind was now intent upon domestic happiness, and, in 1799, he married Elizabath, the eldest daughter of 
John Maddison, Esq. This lady was his amanuensis in transcribing all his manuscripts for the press. 

In 1802 Mr. Middleton received, from the same patron, a presentation to the consolidated rectory of 
Little Bytham. His fondness for local history, as well as general information, induced him to make 
excursions into the country, in which he was often accompanied by Dr. Sayers, whose taste for antiqua- 
rian research corresponded with his own, and whose character he held in the highest esteem. But 
graver studies occupied his chief attention, and particularly the language of Scripture. He was now 
writing his principal work, ** The doctrine of the Greek Article, applied to the criticism and illustratiMi 
of the New Testament." 

In 1808 he took the degree of D.D. at Cambridge, and preached the inangurative sermon before 
that University. 

Early in 1810 he began to act as a Magistrate for the county of Northampton, an office which did not 
accord with the duties of the tutor or the habits of the student ; yet, during the short time he filled this 
situation, he closely applied his talents to the cases that were brought before him, and administered the 
law with the strictest impartiality. 

In A])ril 1812, he was collated by the Bishop of Lincoln to the Archdeaconry of Huntingdon. A 
man of Archdeacon Middleton 's character could not long remain unnoticed by the higher clergy of the 
Metropolis, and his exertions in the pulpit were often called for in behalf of Charitable Institutions. 
Dignitaries and Prelates now cultivated his society. 

The state of religion in India, hitherto neglected, at length attracted the attention of the Legislature, 
and in an act for the renewal of the Charter of the East India Company, a provision was made which 
enabled the crown to constitute a Bishopric, with such jurisdiction and functions as should, from time 
to time, be defined by Hb majesty, by letters patent under the great seal of England. The Company was 
charged with salaries to be paid to the Bishop and three Archdeacons ; Calcutta was erected into a Bishop's 
see ; and Archdeacon Middleton selected to fill the important station. At first he shrunk from the magni- 
tude of the charge, and declined it ; but upon more mature consideration, he thought it unworthy of a 
Christian minister to suffer either the difficulty of the office or dangers of the climate, to deter him from 
the performance of a duty to which Providence seemed to call him. ** You will easily imagine," says 
the author of his memoirs, ** that in accepting this office I have sustained a severe conflict of feelings. 
I had even declined it. But when I came to settle the account with my own heart, I really found that 
I had little to allege in behalf of my decision. I began to suspect that I had yielded to some unmanly 
considerations, when I ought rather to have counted my comfort, and my connections, and my prospects 
at home, as altogether worthless in comparison with the good, of which it might possibly be the design 
of Providence, to make me the instrument. How far even now I have reasoned rightly, God alone knows, 
but I have endeavoured to view the subject impartially, and I trust the Almighty to bless the work in 
which I am to engage." He was consecrated on the 8th of May 1814, by the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, assisted by the Bishops of Lincoln and Salisbury, in the Chapel of Lambeth Palace. Tlie ojipor- 
tunity of extending Christianity in the East, was thus enlarged by the establishment of Episcopacy in 
Cal(nitta, and the appointment of so zealous a member of the Church and so firm a supporter of the 
Society for promoting Christian knowledge as Bishop Middleton, could not fail of behig noticed by 
that Institution. The Committee granted his Lordship a vote of i:,'! 000 to promote the objects of the 
Society in India, in such ways as he should deem most consonant to its designs. 

On the 19th of May, 1814, Bishop Middleton was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society; and having 
taken leave of his friends in the country on the 8th of June, he and Mrs. Middleton, and Archdeacon 
Loring, sailed from Portsmouth on the " Warren Hastings" for Bengal. On the voyage the vessel 
touched at Madeira, and the Bishop preached in that Island ; being probably the first Prelate of the 
English Church who had performed such an office before its inhabitants. 

During his voyage he laid down the following rules for his future conduct. " Invoke divine aid. Preach 
frequently, and as one having authority. Promote schools, diarity, literature, and good taste : nothing 
great can be accomplished without policy. Persevere agaiiKst discouragement. Keep your temper ; em- 
ploy leisure in study, and always have some work in hand. Be punctual and metJiodical in business, 
and never procrastinate. Keep up a close connexion widi friends at home. Attend to forms ; never be 
in hurry. Preserve self-possession, and do not be talked out of conviction. Rise early, and be an 
economist of time. Maintain dignity without the appearance of pride : manner is something with every 
body, and every thing with some. Be guarded in discourse ; attentive, and slow to speak. Never 
acquiese in immoral or pernicious opinions. Beware of concessions and pledges. Be not forward to 
assign reasons to those who have no right to demand them. Be not subservient, nor timid in manner, 
but manly and independent, firm and decided. Think notliing in conduct unimportant and indifferent. 
Be of no party. Be popular, if possible, but at any rate, be respected ; remonstrate against abuses, 
where there is any chance of correcting them. Advise and encourage youth ; rather set than follow 
example ; observe a grave economy in domestic affairs. Practise strict temperance. ' Remember what 
is expected in England — and lastly, remember the first account." 

He arrived in Calcutta on the 28th of November of the same year, and was received witliout any pub- 
lic testimony of respect — but his private reception was such as was due to him as a Bishop. 

On Christmas-day, 1814, he delivered his first sermon in the Cathedral of Calcutta, from Lake, iL 
10, 11. ** For behold I bring you good tidings of great joy which sliall be to all people," &c 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 9 

On the first establishment of Episcopacy in India, it was difficult for the novernment of England to 
define the powers of the Bishop. The ground was to be tried ; and as circumstances occurred he found 
it necessary to seek direction, and authority to meet them, from the Crown, which had placed him in the 
See ; consequently, the effect of his exertions could not be commensurate with the advantage he contem- 
plated, for he had not the means of bringing it to a completion. Still he was asidnous in his endeavours 
to ascertain the state of the mind in his extensive diocese, and lost no opportunity of affording inter- 
views to those who sought a conference. 

In the January following his arrival, the Bishop proceeded to appoint Registrars in the three Arch- 
deaconries, and to forward the instruments of institution to the Archdeacons tlicmselves. Having 
placed the proper officers in the ecclesiastical departments, other bu>iiiess demanded his attention. One 
of the first steps for improvement was, the formation of a School Society at Bombay. His early atten- 
tion was also directed to the education of children in the city of Calcutta. Tlic system pursued in the 
Free School was improved under his direction. He became its Patron, and projected aniiunl examina- 
tions. His Lordship took part in these examinations and distributed the j»ri/es. This had its due effect 
upon the spectators, and shortly after, a native waited upon him with a donation of 500 Rs. He then 
became the visitor of the Orphan School. 

In December 1815, he held his primary visitation at Calcutta, which was attended by ten of the 
Clergy, the rest being absent at the distance of many hundred miles from that city. And on the 18th of 
the same month, His Lordship, accompanied by his family, quitted Calcutta, to make a similar visitation 
of his Diocese ; an undertaking not to be accomplished under 5000 miles. He was conveyed to 
Madras where he landed on the 26th, and on Sunday after his arrival preached at the New Church dedi- 
cated to St. Greorge, which he consecrated on the 8th January 1816, and on the day following, he held 
a confirmation consisting of 278 persons. From Madras, which he quitted on the 31st January, pass- 
ing through Pondichcrry, Cuddalore, and Tranquebar, Tanjore, Arisont. Trichinopoly, Parumbutty, 
Polowcottah, Nazeenchcrry, Pooramgordie, Quilon, Aleppee, Cochin, and Canuanore, tkc. he arrived 
at Bombay on the 14th of May, and there he held a visitation and confirmation, passing his time with 
exemplary benefit to the Christian Church. He left that place and proceeded to Goa, (,'aunaiiore, and 
Aleppee. He arrived at Columbo on the 21st of October, from whence his Lordship, Mrs. Middleton 
and his attendants, returned to Calcutta, which they reached on the 10th of December. 

Relieved from the labours of the visitation, he was enabled to apply his mind to the concerns of the 
city, and resumed his share in the duties of the pulpit. 

On the 7th of August 1818, the Bishop laid the foundation stone of the Church at Dum-Dum. (The 
station of the Artillery) which he afterwards consecrated, and in which he confirmed several persons, 
chiefly soldiers of the station. 

On the 10th of February 1819, he embarked in the Stanmorc to visit his Diocese a second time, 
being attended by Mrs. Middleton and his chaplain, Mr. Hawtaync, and anchored in Madras roads on the 
27th of the same month. He landed on the following morning, when he was received by the Archdea- 
con and Clergy ; from hence he embarked, on the 11th April, to return to Calcutta, via Pcnang, Sunday, 
the 13th June, he joined in divine service at Calcutta, with feelings of peculiar delight. 

In November 1820, the Bishop laid the foundation stone of a New Church in the Metropolis, in 
the centre of a numerous European population, who had no means of attending Divine worship ; near 
this sacred edifice, which is dedicated to St. James, a school was erected for the instniction of Christian 
poor, the expense of which was defrayed by a legacy bequeathed to the Bishop by an officer, aided, and 
by a donation from the Bishop himself. At the same period, in consc(iuence of the invitation of the 
Society that he would suggest such measures as might ajipear to him best calculated to promote their 
designs, he recommended the establishment of a College in the immediate vicinity of Cidcutta, the 
object of which he expressed in the letters which he transmitted to England, and the plan was 
worthy of the projector. It was designed for the education of youth in sacred knowledge, in sound 
learning, in the principal languages used in the East, and in habits of piety and devotion to their call- 
ing, that they might be thereby qualified to preach among the heathen. The favour and jiatronage of 
the pubUc in England was eminently shown towards the projected Institution. The plans and esti- 
mates for tlic building were matured. A plot of ground on the bank of the river, and within three 
miles of Calcutta, containing 20 acres, was granted by Government for its site. To this. Sir C. T. 
Metcalfe, then Resident of Hyderabad, contributed a piece of land adja(;ent, by which the estate 
was greatly improved. The Societies for the Propagation of the Gospel antl Promoting Cliristian Know- 
ledge, gave each 5,000 Rs. to which the Church Mission Society added a similar donation. Tlie Bishop 
contributed 800 Rs. and 500 volumes out of his Library, and Mrs. Middleton ii handsome set of plate 
for the communion table. Thus prepared, on the 15th of December, His Lord<iiip, with much solemnity, 
laid the foundation stone. The whole arrangement of the building was planned l)y the Bishop ; it occu- 
pies three sides of a quadrangle, and contains every requisite for a College, a Hall, a Chapel, a Library, 
and Press. The centre is 150 feet in length, and the two wings arc each 150 feet. It stands in a pro- 
minent situation, on ground adjoining the Company's Botanic Garden. 

Having thus accomplished, in part, what his mind had dwelt upon with intense interest, in January, 
1821, he embarked to visit Bombay, which he had not reached in the former part of his second visitation, 
he arrived at that presidency in the latter end of Febniary. 

On his return from Bombay, on tlie lOtli April, 1821, he went on shore at Cochin, in order to have 
an Intel-view with the Metropolitan of the Syrians on some important point. From thence to Cape 
Comorin and Ceylon, and back again to Calcutta, where he found presiding during his absence, Messrs. 
Mill and Alt, who had arrived from England on the 13th of February to fill the offices of Principal and 
Professor of the College. 

From the most authentic source of information it appears, that on Monday preceding his death, the 
Bishop received the Clergy at dinner, having recently returned to his own house, which had been long 
under repair ; and (except that he was much agitated in the early part of the evening, by uiforraation of 

c 



10 ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

gome very improper proceeding on the part of one of his Clergy) he was mrasnally cheerful and 
animated. 

The next day he went down to the College at an early hour in the afternoon ; from which his physi- 
cian, who happened to be in the house in attendance on Mrs. Middleton, endeavoured to dissuade hiniy 
but in vain. He promised, indeed, that he would not go again at so early an hour. Little did he think 
that he was visiting that favourite spot for the last time. 

On Wednesday, he was occupied during 8 hours in writing to Government on the subject of a suit in 
the Supreme Court, and, at length declared himself quite exhausted, but proposed to Mrs. Middleton 
who, from ill health, had not been out for several days, that she should accompany him in the carriage 
before the sun had gone down. 

They had not proceeded far, when, at a turn in the road, the descending sun, which is always dan- 
gerous, and especially during the damper seasons of the year, shone fudl upon him. A slight cause 
from without, added to the present agitated state of his nerves, was sufficient to produce serious effects. 
The Bishop immediately declared that he was struck by the sun, and returned home ; but refused to 
receive medical advice, and took what was offered him by Mrs. Middleton. When he retired to rest^ 
symptoms of fever and irritability of mind, increased ; on the following night he was with difficulty re- 
strained from rising and pursuing the business that pressed upon his attention. 

On Thursday, the fever had increased so much that he wrote to his physician, Dr. Nicolson, a person 
in whom he had implicit and well grounded confidence. The Bishop, now indeed appeared sensible of 
the extent of his disorder, and said that he thought himself seriously ill, and knew not what would be 
the consequence. He sent a letter to his Chaplain to desire that he would take his place in the pulpit 
at the Catliedral on Sunday. But neither in this, nor in any other communication to his friends, was 
there any intimation of the extreme illness which now oppressed him. They were unconsdous of the 
dreadful event which awaited them till two hours before he expired. The Archdeacon, the Senior 
Chaplain, Mr. Trotter, whom the Bishop had distinguished by his friendship, Mrs. Hawtayne, and the 
physician were with him. He lay for some time exhausted by the violence of the disorder, and breath- 
ing violently till just before his departure, when an expressive smile spread itself over his features. So 
tranquil was the last moment, that it was not marked by a single struggle. 

Thus expired Thomas Fanshaw Middleton, at 11 o'clock on the night of Monday the 8th July, 1822, 
in the 54th year of his age, and ninth of his consecration, to the great loss of the Christian Churdi of 
British India. 

The last offices were performed over the remains of Bishop Middleton on Friday following, the 12th 
of July, amidst the lamentations of all ranks of society. 

No sooner was the sad event made known in Maidras, in Bombay, and in England, than the several 
Societies passed resolutions in honor of his memory, for erecting Monuments in the Cathedral of St. 
Paul, in Madras and Bombay, and in Calcutta. 

Thus beloved abroad and at home de))arted the subject of this memoir. It only now remains that 
it should be closed with some account of his person and disposition. 

In person, Bishop Middleton was above the ordinary stature of man ; strongly formed ; of a florid 
and commanding countenance ; animated and energetic in his manner. In disposition he was 8ang[uine 
and zealous ; ambitious of distinguishing himself amongst the wise and good ; warm and generous to his 
friends and placable and benevolent towards all men ; unbending in his principles, but charitable to 
those who differed from him in opinion. 

As a husband, he was affectionate and exemplary. As a prelate, he was apostolic in his views, vigilant 
in his government, and anxious for the diffusion of the gospel even unto death. 

It is much to be lamented that in his last will, dated 19th January 1821, he ordered all his manu- 
scripts to be destroyed ; amongst these were his admirable lectures on the Litany, which were ready for 
the press. Bishop Middleton died without issue, and without any near relations. 

liie Bishop, in his will, directed that his remains should be interred in the vault under the College 
Chapel, if it were consecrated ; and left an Inscription to be engraved on a tablet in the chapel ; but that 
edifice not being com])leted at the time when he died, the following variation of the Inscription, left 
also by himself, in case he should be interred elsewhere, is to supply its place. 

In hoc. sacello. 
Nomen meum servandum, Volui, 
Thomas Fanshaw Middleton, S. T. P. 

Primus Diceceseos Calcuttensis Episcopus. 
HuinsaB CoUegii ^dtiicandi suasor* 
£t pro. viribus adjutor. 
Jesu Christe. 
Lux mundi peccatorum sal us. 
Prceconibus tuis hinc exeuntibus. 
Opitima quseque dona elargiaris 
£t miserescas annus meae. 
Obiit Anno Redemptoris MDCCCXXII. ^talis LIV. Episcopatus IX, 
voluit Elizabetha uxor conjinactissima. Eodem marmore instgniri. 

If the Chapel had been consecrated, and the Bishop's remains interred in it the Inscription was to 
have run thus ; — 

Prone, hunc. lacum. 

Mortales IX. uvias reponendas volui, 

&c. &c. &c. 

His remains were placed in a leaden coffin, and interred in the chancel of St. John's Church, i^fyj 
the following lines engraved on a Black marble tablet, marks the grave» 

T. F. M., D. D. 
Obut Vill. JuUi, 1822. 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 11 

HENRY LLOYD LORING— (Jfr*/ Archdeacon of Calcutta.) 

fire the christian church of tliis city, which had only two months previously to mourn the loss of its 
mi^ch respected prelate, could recover from the deep regret occasioned by that melancholy event, the 
announcement of the Archdeacon's death, on the 4th of September following, instructed the inhabitants 
that another pastoral leader of distinguished piety and zeal, had been removed from his administration. 
So well understood were the virtues of Archdeacon Loring, that we cannot do better than give, (in the 
absence of all other particulars of his birth, parentage, &c.,) our readers the copy of a publication of 
the day, recording the lamentable circumstance of his demise : — '* We yesterday had the painful task 
of announcing the death of the Archdeacon of Calcutta ; but we cannot suffer the tomb to close over his 
remains without attempting to pay some further tribute of respect and r^ret, which we are enabled to 
do through the means of one, who knew him better than we did. Indeed, to do justice to his character, 
a more intimate acquaintance was necessary than the mere occasional intercourse of society admitted ; 
for although that alone was sufficient to excite feelings of the most cordial esteem, his plain and unobtru- 
sive habits withheld from more cursory observation those many traits which rendered him dear to all 
who had the pleasure of his intimate acquaintance and friendship. Archdeacon Loring was in every 
respect, and in the truest sense of the word, " amiable." It was impossible to know and not to love 
him. Honest, plain, and manly integrity ; " doing to others as he would be done by ;" unaffected humili- 
ty, esteeming others better than himself; gentlemanly principles and manners and sincere piety, all united 
greatly to endear this respectable man to the now sorrowing circle of his friends. The tenderness and 
goodness of his heart and the delicacy of his feelings, are deeply engraven on hearts, which have been 
soothed and cheered by his kind and affectionate attentions ; while they were also gladdened by the 
innocent playfulness of his manners, emanating from the peace of a guileless heart. As a tender husband, 
a fond parent, a pious son, an affectionate brother, and a valuable friend, he has left a chasm, which 
nothing here below can fill. 

His religious character will be judged of according to the views and feelings of those who may dwell 
upon his character. If any conceive that christian faith can only be evinced by the adoption of certain 
modes of thinking and acting, and are content to view him only as an amiable man, tiiey will be far 
from doing him justice, for Christianity entered deeply into his character, and influenced the conduct of 
his life. He regarded religion as an awful thing, and cultivated it in humility of heart, and in faith, 
conscious of his imperfections and demerits, and therefore void of familiarity and presumption. His 
reading was in great measure of a religious kind, and as a proof of the occupation of his mind, when 
sickness most probably called him from his desk to his death-bed, a little book which always lay before 
him, ^* Doddridge's Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul," was found turned down open to the 
chapter, *' On the soul submitting to Divine examination ; the sincerity of its repentance and faith." But 
the surest evidence of a tfuly christian temper is charity, in its true and scriptural sense, and with this 
grace. Providence had greatly blessed him ; that charity which *' suffereth long and is kind, which envieth 
not, vaunteth not itself, b not puffed up, doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not 
easUy provoked, tliinketh no evil, rejoiceUi not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth ; which beareth all 
things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth idl things." Sincere and honest himself, he was 
wholly unsuspicious of others, and was ever ready to view things as favourably as they appeared. If he 
differed in judgment and opinion from others, he did it with firmness, because he acted on principle, 
but without forgetting his own fallibility ; and if he was compelled to condemn, hating to speak ill of 
others, he did it without asperity. His humility was evinced by the directions which he gave at an 
early period of his indisposition to a friend who loved him well, respecting his funeral. 

The sincere regret wUch follows him, testifies that he was beloved ; and from what we have siud (and 
we have not, we think, gone beyond the truth) It will be seen how justly he was so. The veil of eternity 
is withdrawn and this guileless christian is gone to appear face to face with his Maker in heaven, 
where faith and hope being realized and consummated and where charity holds its blessed reign for ever !" 

His remains were interred in the south Park Street Burial Ground on the 4th of September, 1822. 

The following lines are Inscribed to his memory on a white marble Tablet, placed on the south of the 
communion of St. John's Church. 

Henry Ziloyd Ziorinflf, 

First Archdeacon of Calcutta, 

died 4tli September 1822, 

Aged 38 years. 

An humble, pure and heavenly-minded heart. 

Beloved in life and lamented in death ; 

I'his amiable Christian 

has left an impression on the hearts of those 

who knew him, which no tinie can efface. 

It is written in the deepest lines on theirs, 

who in deference to the humility of his character, 

yet, anxious to record his virtues, have placed 

this simple tablet. 



BISHOP HEBER. 

Reg^ald Heber, second son of Tliomas Heber, and Elizabeth Atherton his wife, was bom in the year 
1728. On hLs elder brother's death, without heirs male, he succeeded him as Lord of the Manor, and 
patron of the Rectories of Marton in Yorkshire, and of Hodnet In the county of Salop, which last estate 
had, by intermarriage with the house of Vernon, come into the possession of the family. He married 
first Mary, co-heiress of the Rev. Martm Boylie, Rector of Wrentham in Suffolk, who died, leaving one 
son, Richard, late M. P. for the University of Oxford; secondly Mary, daughter of Cuthbert Alianson, 
D. D. by whom he left three children, Reginald, Thomas Cuthbert and Mary. 

c 2 



■. V" 



12 ST. JOHN'S CHUKCH. 

Reginald, the lamented imbjcct of this memoir, was bora April 2l8t 1783, at Malpas in the county 
of Chester, of which his father was for many years co-rector. His early childhood was distinguished by 
mildness of disposition, obedience to his parents, consideration for the feelings of those around him, and 
by that tntst in God's providence which formed, through life, so prominent a part of his character. 
When little more than t^'o years old, he was dangerously ill with the hooping cough, for which he was 
ordered to be bled ; his moUier took him on her knees, 8a3ring, ** Dr. Currie wished you to loose a little 
blood, I hope you will not object ;" his answer was, *' I will do whatever you please, Mama/' On the 

nurse screaming out that they were going to murder her child, *' poor ," Reginald said, ** let her 

go down stairs." Tlie apothecary then took hold of his arm, on which he exclaimed, '*do not hold 
mc ;*' when assured that if he moved he would be much more hurt, ** I wont stir,'' he replied, and 
steadily held out his arm, looking the whole time at the operation. 

The following year when travelling with his parents in a very stormy day across the mountainous 
country between Ripon and Craven, his mother was much alarmed and proposed to leave the carriage 
and walk. Reginald, sitting on her knee, said — ** Don't be afraid. Mama, God will take care of us." 
These words spoken, as she herself expressed it, by the infant monitor, carried with them conviction to 
her heart which forty- three years of joy and sorrow had not effaced. In 1787, he had an attack of in- 
flammation of the lungs, and was very dangerously ill. The severe remedies to which he was forced to 
submit, were borne without a murmur, and his patience was so i*emarkable, that on his father's asking 
the physician, whether there was any hope of saving his life. Dr. Currie answered, ** if he were not the 
most tractable child I ever saw, there would be none, but I think he will recover." In childhood he 
suffered much from inflammatoiy disorders ; but the hours of convalescence were invariably employed 
in endeavouring to acquire information ; and at six years old, after an attack of typhus fever, wUch 
again nearly brought him to the grave, the first indulgence for which he pleaded was to learn the lAtin 
grammar, that he might have some employment, while lying in bed ; he could read the Bible with fluency 
at five years old, and even then was remarkable for the avidity with which he studied it, and for his 
accurate knowledge of its contents. About this time a discussion arose one day, during his absence, 
between his father and some friends as to the book in the old Testament, in which a particular passage 
was to be found. On Reginald's entering the room, his father referred the question to him, when he 
at once named botli the book and the chapter. 

It was by Mr. Heber's direction that the Bible was first put into his hands in preference to any 
abridgment of it, in order that he might become more familiar with its beautiful language and more 
ready in applying it to the memory with which he was singularly endowed. He greatly profited by this 
system, and its effects were visible in the piety which marked lus youth and became his distinguishing 
characteristic through life. 

He very early became sensible of the necessity and importance of praying, and was firequently over- 
heard praying aloud in his own room, when he little tliought himself within reach of observation. His 
sense of entire dependence upon God and of thankfulness for the mercies which he received was deep 
and almost instinctive. In joy, as in sorrow, his heart was ever litled up in thankfulness for the 
goodness of his Maker, or bowed in resignation to his chastisements, and his first impulse, when afflicted 
or rejoicing, was to fall on hLs knees in thanksgiving, or in intercession for himself and for those he 
loved, through the mediation of his Saviour. He had a con.siderablc taste for drawings, especially for 
architectural designs, and the favourite sketches almost entirely from fancy, which have been preserved 
by his family, bear strong marks of genius and bore promise of tlie superiority which, with little or no 
instruction, he afterwards attained in that art. The study of natural history was also a favourite pursuit, 
and he was fond of exercising his powers of observation in watching the changes of insects and the 
various habits of animals and birds ; but the kindness of his heart would never permit him to keep any 
creatures in confinement, far less to gratify his curiosity at the expense of their sufferings. When his 
little sister had a squirrel given her, he persuaded her to set it at liberty, taking her to a tree that she 
might see the animal's joy at being restored to freedom. His mind seemed never to be at rest, and occa- 
sionally, when with his play-fellows, he would remain silent, absorbed in his own meditations, and insen- 
sible 80 every thing around him, as his memory retained the information he acquired from every possible 
source, as his understanding strengthened, he corrected the errors into which his almost unassisted 
researclics in various branches of knowledge naturally led him. From a child he was inquisitive, and 
always eager to obtain instruction, and never above asking the opinions of others, but with a modesty 
of manner, and an evident anxiety to acquire knowledge, which prevented his being thought intrusive, 
and insured him the attention of those with whom he conversed. In tliis habit he persevered through 
life, and to it he attributed mm^li of the desultory knowledge which he had attained. 

It was a common saying among the servants of the family, that Mr. Reginald never was in a passion. 
It is not of course intended to assert that he was insensible to tlie natural emotions of anger, but that, 
even in childhood, he had so completely acquired the habit of subduing the outward expression of this 
feeling, that he was never heard to raise his voice in anger or to use an impatient expression. Reading 
was his principal amusement from the time he knew his letters ; his elder brother, (to whose affectionate 
superintendence throujijh life of his graver studies, he justly considered himself much indebted.) used to 
say, '* Reginald did more than read books, he devoured them." And when thus occupied, it was with 
difficulty that his at tent ion could be withdrawn. 

After prosecutiiij^ his studies for some time at Dr. Bristow's Academy, in the neighbourhood of 
London, he was entered at Brazcnose College, Oxford, and in 1802, he gained tlie University prize for 
a copy of Latin hexameters. In the spring of 1803 he wrote his celebrated Poem of Palestine, for 
which in that yi-ar, he also obtained a prize. In 1805, he took the degree of B.A. and soon afterwards 
gained a third University prize for an essay on the Sense of Honour, after having been elected a Fellow 
of All Souls, he quitted Oxford, and proceeded on a tour tlirough Germany, Russia and the Crimea ; 
during which he made several excellent notes, afterwards appended to the travels of Dr. Clarke. 

On his return to England in 1808, he published a Political Poem entitled " Europelincs on the pre- 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 13 

gent war." He now retired with his wife, a daughter of Dr. Shipley, Dean of St. Asaph, to the liring 
of Hodnet, to which he had recently been presented ; and for sometime wholly devoted himself to the 
humble but important duties of his station. In 1815, he preached at the Brampton lecture, a series of 
sermons, which he published in the following year, '* on the personality and office of the Christian Com- 
forter." About the same time he composed several articles for a Dictionary of the Bible, and printed 
a discourse which he had delivered before the Bishop of Chester. In 1822, he was ai)pointed Preacher 
at Lincoln's Inn ; and produced a life of Jeremy Taylor, prefixed to a new edition of that eminent 
writer's productions. Soon afterwards, he was offered the Bishopric of Calcutta ; which, after twice 
refusing, he at length, on the suggestion of his wife, consented to accept, and embarked for the East 
Indies, in June 1820. On the 10th of October, he landed at Calcutta. 

On his landing in India, the Bishop found a much greater accumulation of ecclesiastical business 
awaiting his arrival, than he had expected ; it was such as almost to alarm him, not only by its extent, 
but by the importance of the questions immediately brought for his decision, and which his complete 
ignorance of the circumstances of that Diocese rendered still more perplexing. 

Immediately after Bishop Hcber's arrival in India, he undertook the management of every thing 
connected with the College, and assumed, as Vbitor, the power of inspecting its internal arrangement. 
Since the death of its founder, the building had, from various causes (especially from the want of money) 
been much retarded ; but under his inspection, and with the assistance of the annual liberal grant from 
the Church Missionary Society, its progress was rapid. The first Missionaries whom the Parent Society 
sent out, Messrs. Morton and Christian, arrived in Calcutta soon after the Bishop ; but as they could 
not, at the time, be received into the College, he appointed them to superintend two circles of Bengallee 
Schools, supported by the Society for *' promoting Christian knowledge," while they were, at the same 
time, acquiring the necessary knowledge of the languages. In January 1824, Mr. Mill, the Principle 
Professor, with his wife and family, took up his residence in the College, and in the course of the spring, 
a third Missionary from the Society, Mr. Tweddle, and four students, were admitted. 

In 1825, the Bishop preached at Bombay, Colombo, and Calcutta, on behalf of the Society for Pro- 
pagating the Gospel, more especially with reference to the wants of the Mission College, and very con- 
siderable sums were then collected. With the money thus obtained, the College works went rapidly on. 
The second and the third Professors, Messrs. Holmes and Craven, accompanied by Mr. DeMellow, a 
native Portuguese Indian, who had been educated at Cambridge, and ordained by the Bishop of Lon- 
don for the Society's Missions, arrived in the autumn of 1825. 

The Bishop on his arrival required that all tlie Church Missionaries should report their names, ap- 
pointments and letters of orders to the Archdeacons of the respective Presidencies, for the purpose of 
being transmitted to him, that their regular licenses might be made out and returned, in the same 
manner as was observed with the Company's Chaplains. In Calcutta, a meeting of the Church Mis- 
sionary Society's Associations which had recently been formed in connexion with and by the friends of 
the Church Missionary Parent Society, and of which the Bishop was requested to become tlie President, 
was called on the 2nd of December, succeeding his arrival. In the course of its proceedings a resolution 
was proposed *' that every Missionary of the Society should, on his arrival in Bengal, wait on the Bishop 
for his hcense, at the same time he was appointed one of the Vice-Presidents of the Asiatic Society 
in Calcutta ; but was prevented, by his more important duties, from taking the active part in their 
proceedings, to which the interest he felt in their researches would have prompted him. lie, however, 
attended their meetings whenever it was in his power to do so. 

The scarcity of Chaplains in the Bengal Presidency and the bad health of some of those who were 
resident in Calcutta, made the Bishop feel it necessary to perform as much, or more, duty than he had 
been accustomed to in England. 

When the Bishop landed in Bengal he took the office of President of the Diocesan Committee of the 
Christian Society, established in Calcutta ; the native schools, and the various branches of the Society's 
labours in that city shared, in common with other religious societies, much of his time and exertion, and, 
as will be hereafter seen, the interests of their missions powerfully engrossed his attention during his 
last visitation of the southern provinces of the continent of India. 

On the 15th of June 1824, the Bishop began his extensive visitation unaccompanied, save by his 
Domestic Chaplain and his native servants. He proceeded to Dacca, Benares, Meerut, Delhi, Agra, by 
Neemuch and Mhow, to ' the Northern Churches of the Archdeaconry, and so on to Bombay, Poonah, 
and Sholapoor, Madras, Goozerat, &c. The Bishop, in his visitation, inspected the schools, confirmed the 
native Christians, and administered the sacrament, manifesting in every place the liveliest interest in 
the Missionary cause and gladdening the Church by his presence. 

On his return to Calcutta, he put his original intention into execution of forming a District Committee 
of the Society for the propagation of the Gospel, on the same footing with those of Bombay and Ceylon ; 
and he addressed letters to residents in Calcutta, and to all the influential persons with whom he had 
become acquainted on his tour through the Upper Provinces, requesting their assistance in forwarding 
his view. He had the gratificatipn of receiving, from almost every quarter, handsome subscriptions and 
promises of future assistance. 

In December 1825 the Bishop admitted to Episcopal ordination, together with several other candi- 
dates, Abdool Mussed, a convert of Archdeacon Corrie's, and a man of considerable attainments. Early 
in 1826, tl^ Bishop, accompanied by Mr. Robison, visited Chinsurah, about 20 miles from Calcutta ; 
preached on the Sunday, both morning and evening, and was occupied the following morning in looking 
over an old house, which had long been the abode of bats and snakes, for the purpose of deciding on its 
capability of forming a permanent residence for the clergyman and for the establishment of a school. 
Here he caught a fever, which confined him to his room for several days after his return to Calcutta. 
There was one peculiarity attending this illness wliich threw some light on the cause of tlie last fatal 
event at Trichinopoly. The affection of the head with which Bengal fever is invariably accompanied, 
produced so great a degree of dea&ess that he could hardly hear the questions of the medical men who 



14 ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

attended him, nor did this symptom immediately decrease when the fever subsided. Soon after hii 
recovery, he sailed for Madras, where he arrived late in February, and was received with great kindness 
by Sir Thomas Munro, and by all the members of the Madras Government. For his intended viattation 
the Bishop, with his accustomed indifference to personal comforts, had only applied for the services of a 
Native Doctor in case of illness among his escort and servants ; but the Government not only appointed 
one of the best Surgeons on the Matk-os Establishment to attend on him, but directed the Town Major 
to provide every thing for his comfort and accommodation which the heat of the weather would permit ; 
notwithstanding, a feeling, prophetic of the fisital event, seems to have existed in Sir Thomas Mnnro's 
mind ; for he more than once expressed an earnest wish that ** the Bishop's visitation might not end 
ill.'' He left Madras on the 13th March 1826, with cordial feelings of attachment to the inhabitant, 
and increased interest in this important portion of his diocese. On the 17 th he arrived at Pondicherry. 
after an intensely hot march, and found tents pitohed on a burning sand about a mile from the town. 
On the 18th reached Cuddalore, and left it on the 21st, making a night's run to Chillumbra. On the 
25th he arrived at Tanjore, which he left on the 30th of March, and reached Trichinopoly on the 1st 
April. On Sunday the 2d April, the morning after his arrival, he preached at the Government Chnrdi ; 
in the afternoon he confirmed 42 persons. As soon as he returned home from the performance of 
this duty, he complained, for the first time, of a slight head-ache and general feeling of languor. At 
daybreak on the ftttal 3d of April, he went to the Mission Church in the Fort, where senrioea were 
performed in the Tamul language, after which he confirmed 15 Natives in their own language ; and 
again delivered his address on confirmation ; he afterwards went to the Mission House and examined 
into the state of the schools. On his arrival at home (Mr. Bird's house) before he took off his robes, 
he went into Mr. Robison's room, and sitting down by his bedside, entered with energy into the 
concerns of his Mission. His interest had been much excited by all that he had seen. He spoke with 
sorrow of the poverty which the house displayed, and remark^ how necessary it was for the Biahop to 
have regular reports from every mission in India, that he might at least know the wants and necessities 
of all. He then retired into his own room, and, according to his invariable custom, wrote on the badL 
of the address on confirmation, Trichinopoly, April 3d, 1826. This was his last act; for immediatety 
on taking off his clothes, he went into a large cold bath, where he had bathed the two preceding morn- 
ings, but which was now the destined^jigent of his removal to paradise. Half an honr after, his servant, 
alarmed at his long absence, entered the room and found him a lifeless corpse ! Every means to restore 
animation which human skill or friendship could suggest, was resorted to ; but the vital spark was 
extinguished and his blessed spirit had then entered upon its career of immortality, and perhaps .was at 
that moment looking down with fond pity on the exertions of those who would fain have recalled it to 
ito earthly habitation, to endure again the trials and temptations of the world it had quitted. His 
mortal remains were attended to fiie grave with the highest honours, and followed by the tears of the 
inhabitants of Trichinopoly. They rest on the north side of the altar in St. John's Church. 

The government of Madras also ordered a marble to be placed over his grave and a Mural Tablet to 
be erected to his memory la St. John's Church at Tichinopoly, with the following Inscription :— 

Sacred 

to the memory of 

Regfinald Heber, D.D. 

Lurd Bishop of Calcutta, 
who was here 
suddenly called to his eternal rest, 
during his visitation 
of the southern provinces of his extensive Diooese, 
on the 3d of^April, A.D. MDCCCXXVI. 
*' Be ye also ready." 



Monumente are erected to his memory also in Madras, Bombay, Colombo, in the Parish Church of 
Hodnet (and in the Bishop's College of Calcutta). A marble Stetue was also erected under the Eastern 
Portico of St. John's Cathedral, Calcutte, and has been recently removed to that of St. Paul's in Chow- 
ringhee. ♦ 

The following lines are copied from the Tablet erected in the Bishop's College Chapel. 

M. S. 
viri admodum Reverend! 
Reg^inaldi Heber, S. T, P. 

Diceceseos Calcuttensis Episcopi Alterius 

Scriptoris perelegrantis et suavissimi 

Gentium et morum mvestigatoris curiosi PoetsB eximii 

Christianas Fidei prseconis in primis laudandi Quern 

Ingetiii doctrinaeque prseconis cumulatum 

Alumnum gratissimum academia Oxonicnsis 

Sacerdotum pium dilectura rusticus suus caetus 

Amicum dulcissimum propinque et sodales 

Antistitcm venerandum carum. 

IIujus regionis incolse atque indigenae etiam ethnici 

Mirabili consensu agnoverunt 

Nunc repentinsB morte abreptum 

Siemnio desiderio et cuctu reminiscuntur 

Natus inter angles salopienses, 

Obiit Trichinopoli in Provincia Madrassensi, 

III. non Aprilis A.D. MDCCCXXVI. ^tatis XLlll. Episcopatus III. 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. IS 



BISHOP J. T. JAMES. 



Jobn Thomas James, D.D. late Bishop of Calcutta, was born on the 23rd January 1786, at Reigby, 
in Warwickshire, and was the eldest of eight children, which Dr. James had, by his second marriage 
with Arabella, daughter of William Caldecott, Esq. He received the rudiments of his education at 
Reigby School, under the immediate eye of his father ; till, at the age of twelve, he was placed on the 
foundation at the Charter-house, by the late Earl of Dartmouth, one of the Governors of that Institu- 
tion, where he soon won the good opinion of the head master. Dr. M. Raine. Besides distinguishing 
himself in the several studies of the School, he here began to show considerable talent for drawing, and 
in 1803 the first prize medal was awarded to him, by the Society for the encouragement of Arts and 
Sciences, for a drawing of Worcester Cathedral. His own inclination, at this time, was to go to sea, and 
he show^ great fondness for every pursuit connected with naval tactics ; but at the earnest wish of his 
mother, he forbore to indulge the inclination, and soon began to turn his mind to that profession, in 
which he afterwards attained so high a rank. 

After he had been selected to deliver the annual oration at the Charter-house, in May 1804, he was 
removed to Christ's Church, Oxford, where he entered as a commoner ; but had scarcely begun to reside 
there, when the death of his father deprived him, at once, of his best instructor and ablest guide. He 
soon after was examined for his B. A. degree, and continued to reside at Christ's Church, where he was 
deprived of his books and drawings, and indeed of all that he possessed, by an alarming fire ! It may be 
worth mentioning, as characteristic of Mr. James, that, bereft as he was of all his little property, so 
soon as he found that the flames were extinguished, he calmly set down and made a sketch of the tire, 
from which he afterwards finished a large drawing ! 

After proceeding to the degree of M. A. in 1810, he became a tutor in Christ's Church, till an 
opportunity occurred of indulging his wish to see foreign countries. In 1813, he went to the conti- 
nent, and on returning back to England, Mr. James published his travels in one volume, of which three 
editions were called for in succession. At the wish of his friends he published a series of views taken 
during his tour. In 1816 he visited Italy, and soon after his return, was admitted to Holy orders, 
resigning his studentship at Christ's Church, on being presented by the Dean and Chapter to the small 
vicarage of Flitton. Here he followed those literary pursuits, to which he had become deeply attached, 
and published *' the Italian Schools of Painting," the success of which work led him to publish in 1822 
" the Flemish, Dutch, and German Schools ;" he had it in contemplation to proceed to the painters of 
the English School, and also those of France and Spain ; but his attention was now engrossed by a 
more serious subject. In consequence of the daring attacks of infidels upon Christianity, he published 
a volume entitled ** the Semi-sceptic, or the common sense of religion considered." 

In 1823, he married Marianne Jane, fourth daughter of T. Reeves, Esq, to whom alone, during his 
illness in India, he was indebted for all the earthly comfort that smoothed lus bed of suffering in the last 
hours of his life. 

In 1826, when the intelligence reached England that the see of Calcutta had become a second time 
vacant by the lamented death of Bishop Heber, an invitation was transmitted to Mr. James to fill that 
highly responsible situation. Upon receiving the offer, he at first declined it ; but being afterwards 
strongly advised to reconsider his objections, he determined to consult the best medical advisers as to 
the fitness of his constitution for enduring the climate of India. Finding that two able Physicians, who 
were acquainted both with his constitution and the climate of India, coincided in opinion, that there 
was nothing in the state of his health which ought to deter him from going to that country, he felt 
that he could no longer answer his own conscience if he declined a post on account of its danger, and 
therefore made up his mind to accept it. 

The University of Oxford paid him the compliment of conferring on him the degree of D.D. by 
Diploma, and on Whit-Sunday, June 3d, he was consecrated Bishop of Calcutta. On the 9th July he 
quitted London with Mrs. James, and leaving their two elder children under the care of Mr. and Mrs. 
Reeves, set out for Portsmouth. 

On Friday, January 17th, 1827» the vessel on which he had embarked, arrived off Kedgeree, and was 
riding at anchor there when the long-wished for steamer was seen making her way towards it. Arch- 
deacon Corrie, Dr. Mill, Mr. Eales and Mr. Abbott, were on board to pay their respects to their new 
Diocesan, as were also Mr. W. Cracroft, Mr. A. Prinsep and some other private friends, who accom- 
panied the Bishop and his family on board the Steamer amidst the waiving of hats and salutes ; as 
soon as they landed, the Bishop was immediately conducted by the aid-de-camp of the Governor Grene- 
ral to the Government House, where he was most kindly welcomed by Lord Amherst. The next day, 
being Sunday, the whole party with gratified hearts went to the Cathedral, where the Bishop was 
received by the Archdeacon and Clergy and enthroned with the usual ceremonies in that seat which was 
shortly to be again vacant by his decease. 

The business of the Diocese, at all times too much for the charge of one Bishop, had fallen into most 
extensive arrear during the vacancy of the See ; many important cases had been awaiting the Bishop's 
arrival, and he found that they embraced matters of no ordinary delicacy and anxiety. To these, he 
immediately directed his whole attention ; leaving the arrangement of his household and domestic affairs 
to Mrs. James. 

The first object which engaged his attention was the advantage which would arise, if eadi of the 
Company's chaplains could have some particular district assigned to him, within which it should be his 
duty to visit the sick and perform all parochial duties : — for this purpose, he divided the city of Calcutta 
into three ecclesiastical districts, the new Church in Fort William making a fourth. The benefit arising 
from th&se divisions was obvious to all, and was promulgated, with a plan of the districts annexed, 
under the sanction of the Governor General, in a Gazette extraordinary April 3d, 1828. 

On the 10th of March the Bishop appointed Mr. Robinson, Chaplain to the late Bishop Heber, to 
the vacant Archdeaconry of Madras. This was the only piece of preferment which it fell to his lot to bestow. 



IS ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

The time had now arrived when the Bishop was to commence the visitation of his Diocese, and he 
had decided to commence with the Presidency of Bengal ; which alone he expected would occupy him 
for eight or nine months. Arrangements for this purpose were made with all possible expedition, 
because, since his arrival in India, he had undergone repeated attacks of illness, and was much 
weakened by their force. Dr. Nicolson seemed to think that great benefit might be expected from the 
bracing air of the river ; accordingly, on the 2 1th June, the Bishop left Calcutta for the Upper Provinces. 

On the 16th July, he reached Bhaugulpore and felt the passage favorable to the recovery of his 
strength, while pursuing his journey, ** In hope and not in fear," as he often expressed to her in whose 
affectionate confidence every feeling of his heart reposed. About noon the Bishop was this day so ill, 
that he could not land till the evening ; he was then, with difficulty, moved on shore to the house of 
Mr. Nisbet, the Magistrate. The pain in his side had increased with such alarming violence that it 
excit«d the worst apprehensions ; medical assistance was promptly and vigorously engaged. The doctors 
urged an immediate return to Calcutta, but it was not till Wednesday July 23d, that the Bishop and 
Mrs. James returned to their ]jinnace and began to retrace their voyage, when they reach^ the 
metropolis on Thursday the 31st (a council-day) just in time to send in a letter to the Government 
before the Council broke up ; the Governor General and Lady William Bentinck immediately sent to 
offer the use of Government House, which was near the river ; but Dr. Nicolson came on board and 
wished him to remain on the pinnace, desiring however that no time should be lost in getting out to 
sea ; Penang was considered the best place for the present, until the patient had recovered strength 
fiufiicient for a voyage to England. 

On Wednesday the 6th August, the Bishop left Chaundpaul Ghaut, proceeding to the H. C. Ship 
** Marquis Huntley," which was then lying in Saugor Roads and ready to proceed on her voyage to 
China ; on the evening of Saturday the 9th of August, the party reached the '* Marquis Huntley," and 
his Lordship was soon comfortably placed on a sofa in the cabin ; his spirits were raised by finrimg 
himself at sea ; he was free from pain ; he thought he was certainly better, and for some days the 
hopes of all around him were raised ; but the shivering fits which shortly came on, followed by -violent 
perspirations and the most distressing hiccups, convinced Dr. Spens, and others that he was really getting 
worse. On Thursday the 21st a great and unhappy alteration had taken place, though he still thought 
himself better. Mrs. James, seeing this, made up her mind, with the fortitude which became her, to the 
trying task of communicating to him the awfiil truth. Great was her agony in this afflicting hour ; hut 
her sobs were suppressed for the sake of him whose slumbers she was watching. It was his delight, 
that she should regularly read to him some portion of the Scriptures every morning. She at length 
disclosed to him the delusiveness of liis hopes, and the reality of his situation. After a momentary 
pause, he thtrnked her most warmly, and said, "If it is so, my hope and my firm faith is in Jesus 
Christ!" He aftej?wards determined that they should receive the Holy Sacrament together the next 
morning ; and at intervals, in the course of the evening, calmly gave directions about his papers ; and 
having instructed Mr. Knapp, to add a few lines which he directed to a document relating to the 
Bishop's College, with great effort he held the pen, while his hand was guided to make his signature to 
it ; having so done, he observed, ** now every thing is off my hands." 

The next morning, August 22nd, 1828, he received the Sacrament with Mrs. James, at the hands 
of Mr. Knapp, and afterwards made many Christian reflections on the state of the soul, while strength 
remained for utterance, but now, only in a low wiiisper. As evening came on, it was evident he was 
sinking, and that the hour which was to close his useful and active life, was drawing near. The feet 
became cold and the eyes dull, the hands refused any longer to answer the grasp of affection, he sunk 
into a dose, and at nine o'clock quietly resigned his spirit into the hands of his Creator and Redeemer. 

It was thus in the second year of his consecration for the government of the Indian Church that 
Bishop James departed. His mind was, by nature, quick and vigorous ; and to the acquirements of a 
scholar and a highly cultivated taste in the fine arts, he added a large stock of general information, the 
result, not only of private study, but of much travel in foreign countries, and acute observation of human 
nature. Such accomplishments, united with sound judgment, most cimciliating manners, and the mcHC 
sterling recommendations of real Christian benevolence, and a warm and generous heart, readily woo 
for him the esteem and regard of all who knew him, and made him the chosen adviser, not of his fomilj 
only, but of the entire circle of his frieutls. 



BISHOP TURNER. 

It is due to the memory of this excellent Prelate, and may not be unacceptable to those who feel an 
interest in the progressive improvement of British India, to take some notice of the events by which 
that progress has been marked during the brief period of his Episcopate ; events in the accomplishments 
of which he himself took so prominent a part. 

That period did not exceed one year and seven months, of which eight only were passed at Calcutta, 
and yet, during this short space of time, he originated so many useful and benevolent measures, that 
brief as it was, it must always be viewed as an important era in the history of this settlement. 

The object of these remarks being merely to give an account of what has taken place since his Lord- 
ship's arrival in India, it would, in some degree, interfere with the plan to enter on a detailed review of 
the earlier occurrences of his life. It will therefore be sufficient to observe, that he completed his 
education at Christ's church, Oxford, where he gained the notice and friendship of Dr. Cyril Jackson, 
then the distinguished Dean of that College. He was afterwards selected by the Lord ChanceUor 
fiUenborough, as Preceptor to an only son, with whom he resided some time at Eton, and travelled over 
much of Europe. At the period of his appointment to India, Dr. Turner was rector of W^ilmslow, a 
large manufacturing Parish in Cheshire, and chaplain to his brother-in-law, the IMshop of Chester. In 
these situations he acquired that experience in the art of education, that knowledge of the operation of 
charitable Institutions, and that zeal for the sacred duties of the profession to wliich he belonged, the 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 17 

beneficial application of whicb haa, since his death, called forth from the different relig:iotifi, charitable 
and philanthropic Associations of which he was the head, the most grateful acknowledgments. 

One of the first things which struck the late Bishop, on his arrival in India, was die indispensable 
necessity of taking steps to encourage a due observance of the Lord's-day, among the christian com- 
munity. Having only recently quitted a part of the world where that observance is enforced by law, 
he thought it incumbent on him at least to invite the voluntary practice of it in Calcutta, and by that 
means prevail, if possible, with its christian inhabitants, generally, to set an example, which the Govern- 
ment itself, yielding to the force of public opinion, might perhaps eventually be brought to imitate. He 
was aware that his predecessors, Bishops Middleton and Heber, the one officially and the other privately, 
had endeavoured to prevail on the Government to enforce such observance in the Public Departments, 
although without success ; but thought that an application from the christian community at large, after 
agreeing to conform to it themselves, might be more effectual. With this view, he circulated a paper, 
inviting all sincere christians to declare that they would personally in their families, and to the utmost 
limits ot their influence, adopt and encourage others to such measures as might tend to establish a 
decent and orderly observance of the Lord's-day ; that, as far as depended on themselves, they would 
neither employ, nor allow others to employ on their behalf, or in their service, on that day. Native 
workmen and artizans in the exercise of their ordinary calling ; that they would ^ve a preference to 
those christian Tradesmen who were willing to adopt this regulation, and to act upon it constantly and 
unreservedly in the management of their business, and that they would be ready, when it might be 
deemed expedient, to join in presenting an address to the Right Honourable the Governor General in 
Council, praying that orders might be issued to suspend all labour on public works upon the Lord's- 
day, as well as all such business in the Government offices, as could without embarrassment to the 
service, be dispensed 'With. The expressions used in this paper, are those of the acts of the British Parlia- 
ment which is in force on the subject. The declaration, as already stated, was framed only for christians, 
and especially for those who are convinced of the duty of attending to christian obligations. Its purpose 
was to invite and to encourage the voluntary practice of those observances which in England are enforced 
by law. Christian individuals were expected to pursue a christian object on christian principles ; and yet 
this measure, so strictly in accordance with what his situation as head of the established Church in India 
rendered it proper in the Bishop to adopt, was met by a portion of the community professing themselves 
christians, with a degree of hostility and misrepresentation for which no difference of opinion, as to 
mere expediency of the course proposed to be pursued for effecting an object so desirable in a christian 
point of view, can we conceive, be considered by any reflecting person, as a sufficient apology. When 
warned which he previously was, of the obloquy that would, probably, be cast upon him for the attempt, 
he replied, that personal considerations of that sort would never deter him from doing his duty. He 
persevered, and the result proved the anticipation to have been too well founded. He had, however, 
the satisfaction of knowing that notwithstanding the hostility and misrepresentations in question, the 
object in view, namely, the due observance of the Lord's-day, was, even here, extensively promoted by 
the meajsure, and at one of the sister Presidencies, his endeavours for the same purpose were, afterwards, 
still more successful. 

The next important step taken by Bishop Turner was the formation of the District Charitable Society. 
There was already in Calcutta a charitible fund for the reUef of distressed Europeans and otliers, estab- 
lished in the year 1800, chiefiy by the exertions of the late Rev. David Brown, which continued 
to be administered by the select vestry of St. John's Cathedral ; but however well adapted the vestry 
may have been, for the distribution of the charitable funds of Calcutta some years ago, the number of 
European Paupers had multiplied to so great an extent, that it had become necessary to provide for the 
more full investigation of the cases of appUcants for relief. Frauds, the most gross, were practised on 
the public with such facility, that impostors, speculating on the benevolence of the community and 
making as it were mendicity a trade, have, it is understood, found no difficulty in procuring from money 
lenders, advances, proportionate in amount to the probability qf^uccestt which the acquisition of certain 
leading names to their applications for relief, justified a reasonable expectation of ultimately obtaining. 
To remedy these inconveniencies, some comprehensive arrangement was obviously required, and at the 
Bishop's suggestion, the Society alluded to was established. It consists of several subordinate com- 
mittees, corresponding in number with the Ek^clesiastical Districts into which the town is divided, and 
of a central committee of superintendence. Of this committee any individual subscribing 100 Rs. per 
annum becomes a member. The former are charged with the distribution of the funds, the latter deter- 
mine the principle on which the distribution is to be made and dispose of cases specially referred to them 
for consideration. It is only necessary further to add, that the Society has met with the most cordial 
support, both from the Government and the community, and that its operations are progressively in- 
creasing, both in interest and importance. To the frauds, above alluded to, it has put an effectual 
check, by affording all, to whom applications may be preferred for relief, the means of ascertaining by 
reference to the Central Committee, or to the committee of the District in which they reside, the charac- 
ter and circumstances of the appUcants, and of procuring immediate succour for them if necessary. It 
is almost superfluous to add that the operations of such a Society, so constituted and so supported, can 
be viewed in no other light than as a benefit to the community — a benefit for which it is originally in- 
debted to the late Bishop, as appears from the following resolution proposed by the Honorable Sir 
£klward Ryan, at a meeting of the Central Committee, held on the 18th July 1831, and carried una- 
nimously. 

*' That this Committee have received with feelings of the deepest regret, the distressing intelligence of 
the demise of their highly respected president, The Right Reverend The Lord Bishop of Calcutta, and in 
the painful record of this melancholy event desire to express their grateful sense of those zealous and 
benevolent exertions which induced the formation of the District Charitable Society, and of that kind and 
unremitting attention with which its operations were ever regarded by His Lordship." 

The providing additional accommodation for public worship was the next object that engaged the 



18 ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

BUhop's attention, and arrangements were accordingly brought forward by him, through which no less 
than Uiree churches have been added to the settlement. 

First, the Church at the Free School, which not only enables the wholeof the children of that establish- 
ment to attend public worship on the School premises, but has proved of great convenience to the whole 
of the neighbourhood in which it is situated ; next, the Mariner's Church near the strand, for affording 
the opportunity of divine service to seamen belonging to ships in the river ; and lastly, the Church at 
Howrah, which cannot fail to be of the most extensive convenience to the numerous inhabitants residing 
in that quarter. These arrangements were all effected without any expense to Government. 

But it was not the spiritual interests of Christians alone, that occupied Dr. Turner's attention. He 
felt the deepest concern in the operations of Missionary establishments generally, and in all proceedings 
set on foot for the purpose of disseminating Christianity among the Natives. For the furtherance of the 
views of the Calcutta Church Missionary Society, of which he was the Patron, he was earnestly engaged 
in divising plans and making arrangements, when his last illness overtook him. The Diocesan Com- 
mitees of the Society for Promoting Christian knowledge and of the Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel, have recorded their grateful sense of the attention paid by him to the interest of these bodies, 
and at the annual meeting of the Calcutta Auxiliary Church Missionary Society, held in the old Church- 
rooms on the 26th of July 1831, the following resolution was passed unanimously : *' That this meet- 
ing receives with deep regret the sad and mournful Intelligence of the irreparable loss which the Society 
has sustained by the demise of the Lord Bbhop of Calcutta, the zealous patron, and steady friend and 
advocate of the Missionary cause, and begs to record the grateful sense which it entertains of the distin- 
guished services rendered by his Lordship, both in the plans suggested, and the labours undertakok to 
promote the interests of that cause, during the short period he was spared." 

But the measures from which the greatest benefits may be expected to be derived, arc those intro- 
duced by the Bishop to improve the system of public instruction, and which, had he been spared to 
see them carried into effect, would in all probability have realised, on that head, as much as is attain- 
able in this distant quarter. With him originated the Infant School ; — the first which was ever institu- 
ted, at least in this part of India, and the whole expense of which was boiiie by him till his death. In 
the Christian Intelligencer for October 1830, this Institution is spoken of as follows : — 

** It is highly gratifying to see the facility with which some of the children add and substract by 
means of the Abacus, and the progress the elder ones have made in reading, writing, and needle- work, 
is quite surprising. Indeed altogether the scene is highly interesting. Every humane heart must 
rejoice to see so many infants snatched like ' brands from the fire,' and placed in an Institution where 
tiieir innocent and tender minds will be trained up in the fear of the Lord, and in habits of order, clean- 
liness, and usefulness. The Bishop of the Diocese has, we think, done much for the rising generation 
in establishing this interesting Institution, and we trust the example will be followed not only in all the 
Parochial districts of Calcutta, but likewise in other large towns, and also in the other Presidencies of 
India." 

The plan of the High School (now St. Paul's School) was likewbe arranged by him. He drew up 
the proposal for establishing it by proprietary shares, engaged for it the services of an able Rector, 
regulated the course of instruction to be pursued in it, and when opportunity offered, gave it the bene- 
fit of his own personal superintendence. The nature of this Institution, and the system of education 
pursued were fully explained at a meeting held for the purpose on the 2d of August, 1831, at which the 
Honorable Sir C. E. Grey took a leading part, and to which the following resolution was carried una- 
nimously : — ** That this meeting receives with deep regret the melancholy intimation of the decease of 
their late respected Chairman, the Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of the Diocese, whose zeal in pro- 
moting the cause of education upon the only ])rinciples which can render it beneficial to mankind * 
whose unwearied labours in forwarding the best interests of all around him, and whose amiable dis- 
positions, unassuming manners, and easiness of access, nmst cause his decease to be considered as a 
heavy calamity to the community at large, and to this institution in particular, which has in his death 
to deplore the loss of an able, experienced, and warm friend ; and they take this opportunity of re- 
cording their grateful sense of the services he had rendered the graduated system of which he thus laid 
the foundation, and which was intended, by means of the Infant School, the Free School, the High 
School, and Bishop's College, to provide for the intellectual wants of infancy, childhood, youth and open- 
ing manhood, would have left nothing in this respect for the Christian community to require ; but his 
views, as already stated, were not conftned merely to the community ; he saw in the state of Uiings 
which had already been effected, an opening through which Christian instruction might be succ^sfully 
imparted to the natives ; and as he was convinced that no other description of education would ever ren- 
der them what it is desireable they should become, namely, well-principled, well-informed, and well- 
conducted members of society, he was therefore determined to avail himself of every favorable upporta- 
nlty that offered for directing their views to this object." Before proceeding to Benares, in June 1830 
he visited the different native schools and colleges in which so much progress has been made in the ac- 
quisition of European literature and science, and he was greatly surprized and delighted with what he 
saw. On his return from his primary visitation of the other Presidencies, several of the students waited 
upon him, and testified the strongest disposition to cultivate the most cordial communication with him. 
He had purchased, at a considerable expense, various astronomical and mathematical instnimmts, fiv 
the purpose of assisting them in the prosecution of their studies in the higher branches of those sciences 
and he was in hopes that the minds of the native youth, who might thus by degrees collect themselves 
around him, would, in the progress of these pursuits be led to look ** through nature, up to Nature's 
God." But these hopes he was never permitted to realize, and all that remains to be said is little more 
than a recital of what took place at the closing hours of his life, and which, by those who reflect, that 
their own last hour must, sooner or later, likewise arrive, cannot fail to be studied with advantage. It 
is not our intention to dwell on any thing that took place during his visitation at the other Presidencies. 
Suffice it to say, that he quitted Calcutta for Madras on tlie 18th September 1830 \ from Madras be 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 19 

proceeded, overland, to Bombay, from Bombay, to Ceylon, whence, after having been engaged in va- 
rious arduous duties at tlie several stations, he quitted. After having been exposed by land and sea, to 
the most exhausting heat and fatigue, he returned to Calcutta on the 4th of May 1831, a djring man. 
One circumstance, however, we cannot omit to notice, because it affects a body of men to whom the 
testimony of such an individual cannot be indifferent, and which but for this opportunity woiM perhaps 
have been lost for ever. In a letter to a friend dated Colombo, March the 17, 1831, he wrote as follows : 
** I have been much interested by what I have seen and heard in Ceylon. A very useful lesson may 
be learned here, especially important to those who, like myself, are apt to growl at the Company's 
domination. Every measure we would desire to see adopted in India may be found in actual operation 
in Ceylon : there is no restraint on colonization ; the Government avoids interfering in mercantile con- 
cerns, (except as respects the sale of cinnamon and pearls ;) trial by Jury is fully established ; in a 
great part of the Island, there Is an extensive and systematic provision for Government schools, and 
yet every thing languishes. There is no spirit of improvement ; industry, either commercial or agri- 
cultural, seems altogether unknown ; and the finest Island in the world, rich in spontaneous productions, 
richer still in those which might be procured by labour, with noble harbours and a situation that com- 
mands the commerce of the eastern world, is scantily peopled, and of that scanty population a very 
large proportion are miserably fed, and they are liable almost periodically to severe famine. Wliat 
can be the secret of all this ? However, as matters stand, if you wish to ascertain how completely 
good institutions may be nullified, you may come to Ceylon ; and on the other hand to know how theo- 
retical evils may be cured, you must make su9h a journey as I have done, through the three presi- 
dencies of India. I am satisfied that there is no Government in the world so well served as that of the 
East Indian Company. I mean that no service I ever knew or heard of comprises so large a propor- 
tion of individuals able and willing to discharge their duties." 

Hb health for many years had been far from good ; he had long been subject to internal disease ; but 
during his residence in Bengal it had rather improved than otherwise. On his journey, however, a 
change took place, and after his return, the progress of decay became most rapid and alarming. As 
soon as it was discovered to be of a fatal tendency, a voyage to Penang, and eventually to New South 
Wales, was determined on, in the hope that his valuable life might yet be prolonged ; but, " He in 
whose hands our life is," was pleased, in one short week, to bring all such expectations to an end. On 
Wednesday June 29th, a manifest change for the worse came on. He became sensible of his decay, 
but was not entirely confined to his room more than two days. Of him, it may justly be said, '* Mark 
the perfect man and behold the upright, for the end of that man b peace." As the hand of death 
became heavy upon him, no change of manner, no perturbation of mind, nor alteration even of voice, 
except a little more of solemnity, was observable. He was attended with the utmost assiduity and 
kindness by his medical friends. The Archdeacon had from the departure of his domestic Chaplain, 
resided in the house, and to him, the dying Prelate communicated freely on those subjects which occupied 
his mind. They were altogether such as might be expected from his previous character. The state and 
prospects of religion in India, the circumstances of some of his clergy, his own views of Divine truth 
in the prospect of eternity and the strong support they now afforded him. With such thoughts and 
occasional religious exercises, he met the last enemy as one who had long been expecting his attack, 
and without the smallest sign of reluctance, yielded himself to the sentence incurred by man's original 
transgression. The following is an extract of the character of this invaluable person, copied from a 
sermon preached in the Cathedral by the Archdeacon on the Sunday after the Bishop's death, with which 
this imperfect sketch may be brought to a close. " We have left us in the character of our departed 
Bishop, an example of one who sought glory, honour, and immortality, by patient continuance in well 
doing. He began where the scriptures teach us to begin with personal religion. He had low thoughts 
of himself. He was seriously affected with a sense of his frailties and un worthiness, and rested his hope 
of salvation only on the mercy of God in Jesus Christ. He had attained in a remarkable degree a spirit 
of self-control, so that he was, to a considerable extent, a copy of the great Shepherd and Bishop of our 
Souls, whose word is ' learn of me for I am meek and lowly.' He took Revelation for his guide, and 
whilst the Triune God of the Bible was the object of his adoration, the will of God was the rule of his 
practice." 

*' / have a growing evidence y^* said he, after partaking of the Lord's supper on the 3d of July, ** that 
I know in whom I have trusted," and he went on to contrast the uncertainties attending the pursuit 
of science, with the increasing confidence which the christian feels in Divine Truth as he advances in the 
knowledge of it. 

'* In his peculiar office he came near to the apostolical standard in the Epistles of Timothy and Titus. 
Of his learning, and capacity for perpetuating an order of ministers in the Church, it would require 
one of a similar measure of learning and piety to speak, but all could judge, that as a Bishop he was 
blameless and free from reproach ; moderate in all his habits and pursuits, disinterested in a high degree, 
and free from all suspicion of the love of money. That he was apt to teach, and a true labourer in the 
word and doctrine ; sober in judgment, wise to solve difficulties ; of a compassionate spirit, and heartily 
desirous of men's eternal good. In the public exercise of his office, he must imavoidably, whilst human 
nature is what it is, have given ofience to some. The lively sense he had of his own responsibility 
rendered him more keenly alive to such defects in any of those under his authority as might hinder their 
nsefulness, or do injury to the cause they had solemnly pledged themselves to serve. He felt himself 
therefore l^ound, when occasion arose, to reprove and to rebuke with all authority. 

" To the patient continuer in well-doing a sense of God's forgiving mercy, takes even in this life the 
sting from death, and an assured hope of eternal life, glides and illumines the dark passage of the valley 
of tihe sluulow of death. This our departed Prelate experienced : the persuasion that God would carry 
on his own work on the earth, and that he could and would abundantly supply the means of so doing, 
left him without a care for this world, an assured hope that on being released from the body, he should 
be with Christ, strengthened him to endure protracted and intense bodily faffering, with patience and 

D 2 



20 ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

fbrtitude, not to be surpassed, till at length, being released from this strife of nature, be entered on the 
Memal life to which he had long aspired. 

To the above we will only add the last words the Bishop uttered, which to those who had the priTilege 
of hearing them, were most affecting, and which no one with the heart of a christian, can, we are sore, 
reflect upbn with indifference. After prayer had been engaged in, out of the ▼isitatkm of the tick, 
ending with the Lord's prayer, to which he added a fervent " Amen,'' a short pause ensued ; it was 
suddenly interrupted by his breaking out, in the most solemn and impressive manner, as follows : " Ob 
Thou God of all grace, stablish, strengthen, settle us.'' " Have mercy upon all, that they may oome to 
the knowledge of the Truth, and be saved." " There is none other name given among men by whick 
they can be saved." " Other foundation can no man lay" — and he spoke no more. 

His remains were entombed in St. John's Cathedral yard by the side of the late Chief Justice BIosmC 

The following lines are inscribed on a white marble Tablet, placed in St. John*s Church watt. 

Sacred to the memory of 
The Right Revd. John Mathias Tnmtr, D.D. 

Lord Bishop of Calcutta, 
He died July 7th, 1831, Aged 45 Years. 
A Scholar, a Philanthropist, a man of God. 
The righteous, and the wise, and their works, are in the hand of God. 

THE RIGHT REVEREND DANIEL CORRIE— rKr»/ Bishop (/ Madras.J 

This amiable and pious man, who by the force of steady and most conscientious ftilfilment of his saered 
duties, rather than by any extraordinary talents or extensive acquirements, raised himself to high office, 
has left behind hira a name, the memory of which India, at least, will not willingly let die. But it is not 
as Bishop Corrie of Madras that the subject of this memoir is endeared to the troops of friends -who still 
mourn his loss ; nor under that title that his name became familiar to the whole religious world. It ii 
not as Bishop Corrie of Madras that we love to think of him ; but as Archdeacon Corrie of Calcutta. 

Daniel Corrie was bom in April 1777 ; his father was a country clergyman ; and Daniel himself wouki 
have moved in the same sphere but for the offer of a Chaplaincy on the East India Company^s establish- 
ment which was made to him soon after ordination. His childhood and boyhood app«u* to have 
presented no very remarkable indications of religious warmth or intellectual promise. Having been 
educated at home, up to the age of seventeen, he was then removed to the house of a friend in London, 
**who had expressed an intention of providing in life for him." Four years afterwards he returned 
home, the temptations of a London life having, it would appear, proved too strong for his unguarded 
youth ; and then, as his heart slowly but certainly began to yield itself to religious impressions, his 
thoughts turned towards the ministry as a profession, and in the summer of 1799 he was ** entered of 
Clare Hall, Cambridge." His good resolutions, however, were soon shaken. The seductive and perni- 
cious environments of College life seem to have been even more fatal to him than the attractions of the 
great metropolis. He spent his first year at the University " in a round of dissipation." But that 
truly apostolic man, Mr. Simeon, was then ministering at Trinity Church. Young Corrie listened with 
attention, and not without profit. He became a regular attendant at the place of worship, and from this 
tune his reformation advanced ; not however without some intervals of painful self-conflict and occasions] 
deviations, which sorely distressed him. In 1802 he was ordained ; and entered the Ministry with a due 
sense of the responsibility of the undertaking. 

Having been appointed Curate of Stoke Rochfort, he continued to reside in that Parish until the 
Easter of 1804, when he returned to Cambridge for the purpose of keeping his Law Exercises. It was 
on this occasion that he cemented a ft-iendship with Henry Martyn, which continued undiminished up to 
the day of the latter's death. Similar in some respects, — yet in others how dissimilar ! — was the career 
of these two yoimg men. They started about the same time on the great journey of life ; both had 
slipped and &llen often at the outset ; they met at Cambridge, listened together to the ministerings of 
Simeon ; from his lips received wisdom, and so receiving it, derived grace from above ; both turned 
their thoughts towards the East — perhaps they had communed together at Cambridge relative to this 
great field of Apostolic labour ; both obtained Chaplaincies on the East India Establishment, and entered 
their new profession with the same missionary aspirations and resolutions, thinking less of the especial 
functions of their new office than of the wants of the whole heathen world. By both the Chaplaincy was 
regarded, in the first instance, as little more than a means to an end. 

In the autumn of 1805 Martyn sailed for Calcutta ; and at the commencement of the following year, 
Corrie in his turn, embarked. His destination was the same. They arrived in India within a few 
months of each other, and were received beneath the same roof — ^the hospitable roof of Mr. Brown, 
another chaplain on the establishment. There is, on the banks of the river Hooghly, at Aldeen*^ an old 
Hindoo Pagoda, now a picturesque ruin overrun with weeds and creepers. In this once popular 
idol- temple, some forty years ago Brown, Martyn and Corrie often met for prayer and ** swert 
counsel." The former had fitted it up as a study and chapel, and there the two young chaplains 
spent a great part of their time. There also, in the infancy of Indian Missions, Martyn, Corrie and 
Brown often met Carey, Marshman and Ward, and with a mutual forgetfulness of all sectarian 
distinctions, mingled their councils for the advancement of Christ's kingdom in this benighted land. 
There is a melancholy satisfaction in recurring to the friendly meetings which were often held at the 
Pagoda of Aldeen by these early labourers, and this feeling is more strongly excited, when it is painfully 
remembered that not one of tWs fiaithful band now survives. ** They rest from their labours and their 
works do follow them." 

But to return to the subject of our memoir : — ^The two friends, Martyn and Corrie started within a few 
weeks of each other on their respective journeys hito the interior. For some time the life of the one, 
but little differed from the liiie of the other. Both were engaged at different Indian stations in the 

* Aldeen is on the eastern extremity of Senunpore, 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 21 

performance of their professional duties, occasionally taming aside, when opportunity offered, to ai^;ti<i 
with, or preach to the natives of the country ; and to this end, intently studying the native languages and 
busying themselves in the good work of scripture translation. The two friends kept up a close corres- 
pondence, detailing, each to each, their professional labours, and commenting upon the impediments and 
obstructions which beset their path — the apathy, and worse than apathy, of Christians, and the heinous 
abominations of the heathen. Painful as it was to these good men to write such letters, they are now, 
after a lapse of forty years, to be read with no ordinary pleasure. The English in India are not now 
what they were, when Martyn groaned in spirit at the infidelity which scoffed at his ministerings, which 
he encountered with all the fortitude of a Christian hero, and when the less earnest soul of Corrie 
shrunk alarmed at the thought of flinging himself. Gospel -armed, upon the spears of the scomers. 
There are men now in Calcutta, who sit in the old Mission Church, and remember the days when 
Martyn and Corrie preached, in that same Chapel, almost to empty pews. 

But the paths of these two good men soon diverged into widely different regions. They met, for the 
last time, at Cawnpore in 1810. Martyn went, in the fulness of his Apostolic zeal, to visit strange 
lands, and find, after long and untold sufferings endured with the courage of a hero, and the patience 
of a saint, an early and unhonored grave. Corrie, along a more pleasant path, and yet not without 
his trials, went straightway to a Bishopric, surviving his friend a quarter of a century, and dying at 
his post ripe alike in time and honour. 

A yvar after the death of Martjm, (Mr. Brown was carried off about the same time,) the first Indian 
Bishop was appointed. The selection had fallen on Dr. Middleton — an accomplished scholar. Corrie, 
who had united himself in the autumn of 1812 to the daughter of a Mr. Myers, was at Calcutta When 
the Bishop arrived ; the state of his health, from his unremitting exertions in the ministry at Agra, had 
injuriously affected his constitution, brought him down to the Presidency, and now compelled him to 
take a voyage to England. He embarked in January 1815, and reached home in due course. ** I well 
remember," said Bishop Wilson, more than 20 years afterwards, *' the affection with which he was every 
where welcomed." At the close of August 1817, he was again in Calcutta. He was then appointed 
to the ministerial charge of the Benares Station, — a scene, as he describes it, of delightful labour ; from 
this place he was removed, in December 1818, to the more important cantonment of Cawnpore. But 
before he could join his appointment at the latter place, he was called to assume one of the Presidency 
Chaplaincies, and, in accordance with this official arrangement, he repaired to Calcutta. Soon afterwards, 
the Senior Presidency Chaplaincy became vacant ; Corrie, in due course, succeeded to it. His duties 
here were multifarious. His labours heavy. He was not one to rest satisfied with mere oflScial performances. 
His self- incurred obligations were as onerous as those which arose out of his recognized profession. 

In the hot weather of 1822, Bishop Middleton died ; Corrie attended his death-bed. Two months 
afterwards, the Archdeacon of Calcutta fell a victim to the cholera, and Corrie was appointed an 
Ecclesiastical Commissioner in conjunction with Mr. Parsons, who had been his fellow -passenger on his 
first voyage to India. Bishop Heber reached Calcutta in October 1823, and immediately appointed 
Corrie to the vacant Archdeaconry. It is, we have already said, as Archdeacon Corrie, that hu name 
is best known both in the Eastern and Western world. 

In 1824, the Archdeacon accompanied Bishop Heber on the visitation tour, the details of which the 
Bishop's delightful journal has rendered so familiar to English readers ; but owing to the delicate state 
of his health, he left the Episcopal party at Lucknow, and turned off to Cawnpore, thence proceeding in 
search of health to the Dhoon. The intoided departure of the Bishop for Madras and Bombay rendered 
it necessary that the Archdeacon should return to Calcutta. He accordingly repaired to the Presidency, 
which he reached in the cold weather of 1825. The Bishop departed, never to return, and the Archdea- 
con preached the funeral sermon of the deceased Prelate. The affairs of the Diocese now devolved 
upon him, and he took possession of the Bishop's Palace. But there was no less of humility. In 
secret he recorded his fears that large means were a snare to him, and that the social requirements of 
high office, the necessity of enlarged hospitality and constant public appearance, distracted his mind 
from private devotion. For more than a year he continued to act as Commissary ; and when Dr. James, 
a man of a refined mind, an art-critic, and an author of some note, was appointed to the vacant See, 
he rejoiced in being thus relieved from the responsibility of the chief ecclesiastical control. But it was 
not long before he was again called upon to administer the affairs of the Diocese. The career of Bishop 
James was but a brief one. He rapidly sickened and died. And again the Archdeacon found himself 
at the head of the Anglo-Indian Church. 

At the close of 1829, Bishop Tomer, an amiable and pious man, whose great merits have never been 
sufficiently acknowledged, arrived in Calcutta. But, like that of his predecessor, his career was a very 
brief one. In July 1831, the Indian Church was a fourth time deprived of its chief Pastor. The 
Archdeacon attended the death-bed of the Prelate ; and has minutely recorded the particulars of the last 
days of Bishop Turner, in a very interesting paper which is copied in the volume now before us. On 
Archdeacon Corrie once more devolved the painful duty of preaching the funeral sermon of a deceased 
Diocesan. There is no doubt that, at this time, Corrie would have been nominated for the vacant 
Bishopric ; but it was necessary that no time should be lost in filling up the appointment, and the 
Archdeacon must have proceeded to England for consecration. Accordingly Dr. Wilson, the present Me- 
tropolitan of India, who was then ministering in Islington, (a man of signal piety, great intelligence, and 
an energy of character, which neither age nor infirmity, nor the wasting climate of Bengal, have im- 
paired,) was consecrated fifth Bishop of Calcutta. But in 1834, the renewal of the Company's charter, 
under which two new Sees were established, afforded an opportunity for the well-eamed promotion of 
Archdeacon Corrie. His ministerial labours were now to find a fitting reward. At the close of 1834 he 
was nominated Bishop of Madras. In the cold weather of that year, he sailed for England, was con- 
secrated on the 14th of June, 1835, and almost immediately sailed again for the shores of India. He 
arrived at the end of October, and entered upon the duties of his new office with characteristic assiduity. 
About the middle of the following year, he made an extensive visitation tour of his Diocese ; and soon 



M ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

after his return to the Presidency, it pleased Providence to visit him with the severest affliction ha 
had ever been called upon to sustain. On the last day of 1836, Mrs. Corrie breathed her last. But 
his bereavement was not of long continuance, for on the 5th of February 1837, he was united to her in 
a better world. Over-exertion of body and distress of mind had done their work upon him but too 
surely. When death came, it found him at his post. He was seized with his last rapidly fatal illness, 
when on his way to attend a meeting of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. 

We cannot allow the record of this event to pass over without expressing our deep sense of Dr. 
Corrie's christian virtues. To know him, even in a remote degree, was to love him. It was impossible 
to come within the range of his influence without being impressed with the most affectionate esteem for 
his character ; for he seemed to live in an atmosphere of benignity. His venerable figure would always 
have commanded respect, even if it had not been set off by that suavity of manner and cheerfulness of 
disposition which imparted so great a charm to his social intercourse. He never permitted the majesty 
of divine truth to be compromised for a moment by any def;^rence for his fellow-men ; at the same time 
he enforced the claims of religion with a degree of mildness, mixed with earnestness, which appeared to 
give them additional weight. Hui instructions acquired a tenfold efficacy from his own example, whidi 
afforded a pattern of the most genuine Christian simplicity. Free, to a great extent, from the infirmi- 
ties to which human nature is subject, he was ever ready to make allowances for the faults of others, 
while he reproved them with sincerity. If there was any drawback in his character, it appeared to 
arise from the predominance of the goodness of his heart over the firmness of his determination. He 
was not merely given to hospitality, but devoted to it. His liberality knew no bounds ; but his means, 
too frequently overstepped the bounds of prudence and obliged him to submit to pnvations of w^hidi 
his own benevolence was the cause. He acted but as the almoner of his income, which he appeared to 
consider, like every other possession, as a trust for the benefit of others. In this trait of his character, 
he was the exact counterpart of Brown and Thomason, who were remarkable for giving away every 
thing, and giving it cheerfully. Though Dr. Corrie was not calculated, from the feebleness of his 
voice, and a nervous tremour, to shine as a public speaker, his private ministrations in society, and in 
his own circle, made ample amends for the absence of pulpit eloquence. From his first arrival in Hm 
country, he considered himself a debtor to the heathen, among whom he laboured, as opportunity ofifered, 
with zeal and success. To the diffusion of divine truth and of Christian principle he devoted all the powers 
of his soul, and there was no Institution for the promotion of these objects, which did not receive his 
cordial support. Rarely has such a combination of Christian excellence been presented to public admira- 
tion. All that remains to us of it now is the example which he has left behind, and which, if ri^tly 
improved, will serve to animate and encourage those whom he can no longer instruct with his lips. 

The following Tablet was erected by a public subscription of his friends and placed in St. JoktCs 
Cathedral^ and another in the Old Church, 

This Tribute of affectioD.is raised by the Christian community of this Presidency, 

'J'o the memory of 
The Right Revd. Daniel Corrie, L.L.D. 
Late Lord Bishop of iMadros, and formerly Archdencon of Calcutta ; 
The friend and fellow-labourer of Henry Martyn, 
The beloved Prelate, 
died at Madras on the 6th day of February 1837, 
In the 59th year of his age, and the second of his Episcopate. 
*• They rest from their labours and their works do follow them." 

The following inscriptions are copied from Tablets placed within St. John's Cathedral : — 

Sacred to the memory of the late 
Michael Cheese, Ksquire, 
Surgeon on the Honorable Company's Bengal Establishment, 
and Garrison Surgeon of Fort William ; 
Dedlcate<l by public contribution, 
in token of the high and well merited esteem of this community 
for the enlarged and practical philanthropy of that gentleman's character. 
Perhaps never had the remains of a Christian in India been followed 
to their tomb with more heartfelt and expressed regret than 
was manifested by the numerous assemblage of all classes of the society of this place, 
who attended his funeral on the 16th of January 1816. 
He had exercised his professional talent with an ability 
which did honour to him as a practitioner of medicine, 
and with a munificence worthy ot the religion he professed. 
If a change of air or expensive nutriments were oesireahle, 
but could not be afforded from the resources of a patient, 
Mr. Cheese supplied the means, and when all human endeavours proved unavailing. 
His purse was ever open to clothe and support the destitute mourners ; 
That he was ever a welcome guest alike to the children and to the heads of the family. 

This Monument is erected to the memory of 
Sir Benjamin Heath Malkin, Knight, 
One of the Judges of the Supreme Court o( Judicature ; 
A man eminently distinguished by his literary and scientific attainments. 

By his professional learning and ability, 

By the clearness and accuracy of his intellect, 

By deligence, by patience, by firmness, by love of truth. 

By public spirit, ardent and disinterested, yet always under the guidance of discretion ; 

By riged uprightness, by unostentatious piety. 

By the serenity of his temper and by the benevolence of his heart. 

He was born on the 29th of September 1797, he died on the 2l8t of October 1837. 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 23 

DR. WILLIAM TWINING. 

The subject of this memoir was born in Wales, where his fiather was a Clergyman, but in what part 
of the Principality is uncertain. The first event uf Mr. Twining's life about which any precise informa- 
tion can be gained, is that, in 1808, he was a student of Guy's Hospital, being then about 18 years of 
age. Sir A. Cooper, Messrs. Forster and Lucas, were the Sui^eons of the Hospital ; and Sir Astly 
and Mr. Clive were the principal lecturers. Here Mr. Twining distinguished himself by the same deli- 
gence and application which he ever afterwards displayed through life ; and so much interested was he 
in the pursuit of anatomy, that, instead of availing lumself of the summer recesses, in the Medical 
Schools in London, to leave town and enjoy himself in the country, (the plan usually adopted even by 
very industrious yoimg men,) he entered himself as a pupil to that celebrated anatomist, the late Mr. 
Joshua Brookes, whose class remained open during the summer months. He there laboured with 
unwearied industry, and with so much success, that his instructor, (delighted with his zeal and acquire- 
ments) employed him as an assistant in his own private dissections, and afterwards made him hu de- 
monstrator, an office of great honor for so young a man. Had Mr. Twining remained in that situation 
and devoted himself thenceforth t© the employment of lecturing, there is no doubt that he would ulti- 
mately have stood in the highest rank as an anatomical teacher ; and where could a member of the 
Medical profession wish to be more proudly placed ? But he was destined to shine in another sphere, 
and in a distant clime. He remained only t^o years with Mr. Brookes, and then, lured by the prospect 
of instruction which the brilliant campaigns in the Peninsula offered to all young Surgeons, and perhaps 
also tempted by a natural desire of seeing the world under such advantageous circumstances, he entered 
the army, (Medical Department) and in 1810 joined as Hospital Assistant to the British Troops in 
Portugal under Lord Wellington. In* this capacity he served with the army during the whole course 
of the war, and was present at most of those glorious battles which contributed so pre-eminently to 
raise the British name. 

In March 1814, he was promoted to the rank of Staff Assistant Surgeon, and placed on the Staff 
of General Lord Hill, in which capacity he entered Paris with the allied army. In 1815, he had the good 
fortune to witness the ever memorable conflict and crowning victory of Waterloo. 

After the termination of the war, he remained in Lord Hill's family, till his marriage, which took 
place in 1817. He was then stationed with a Regiment at Portsmouth. In 1819, he was employed in 
the Hospital at Chatham *, and, for a short time, was Staff Assistant Surgeon at the Cavalry Depdt at 
Maidstone. But after the turmoil and perpetual excitement in which he had been engaged for so many 
years, the inactivity of a garrison life was by no means congenial to his feelings. To obtain an employ- 
ment more suited to his taste, he volunteered for foreign service. He was accordingly ordered to the 
West Indies ; to this order he declined, stating his wish to be sent to the East, and claiming priority of 
choice on account of his previous services ; at the time, however, he was disappointed ; but shortly after- 
wards he was asked by Sir Edward Paget, to join him in Ceylon as his personal Surgeon, an office of 
which he gladly availed himself, and in 1821 , he sailed accordingly for that colony. 

In 1823, when Sir Edward, after having been appointed to the command of the Indian army, arrived in 
Bengal, he was accompanied by his Surgeon, and travelled with him to the Upper Provinces in his first tour 
of inspection. Calcutta at that time presented an inviting prospect for an aspiring member of the profession. 
Mr. Twining, influenced by that circumstance, and thinking, moreover, that it was, at length, time to quit 
his wandering career of life, resolved to leave His Majesty's service and enter that of the Honorable Com- 
pany, in the attainment of which object he was kindly assisted by the Commander-in-Chief. In 1824, 
Sir Edward Paget obtained for him the appointment of Assistant Surgeon on the Bengal Establishment. 
He still retained his commission in the King's service and held it till 1830, when he was compelled, by 
the Home Authorities, to relinquish it, or resume his duties with a British Regiment. The latter alter- 
native he was not likely to choose, considering the advantageous position in which he then stood, as a 
successful practitioner in Calcutta, and on the 7th December 1830, he accepted the regulated commuted 
allowance of officers of his rank, and quitted the British army. 

He remained on Sir Edward's Staff for a short time, and was then placed in the General Hospital as 
senior permanent Assistant, a situation he held until the time of his death. From this period ma^r 
be dated the commencement of the brilliant, though unhappily brief, professional career which has ren- 
dered Mr. Twining so conspicuous in life, and so much regretted in death. 

Mr. Twining was not long in the General Hospital ere the public began to discover his worth and to value 
his services proportionately. He soon became extensively engaged in private practice. People of all ranks 
and religions, Europeans and Natives, flocked to him ; and perhaps no man was ever better fitted to 
succeed in this department of his profession. His profound knowledge of disease, in every form under 
which it could be presented to him, together with the natural firmness of his character, gave a marked 
decision and promptitude to his manner, which at once inspired the sick with confidence and hope. 
The extent of his practice had latterly become so great, and his exertions so severe, as visibly to impair 
his health ; though, unshaken in fortitude, he never permitted illness to serve him as an excuse for 
idleness, and he used to boast that he had not been absent from his duty for a single day, since he had 
been in Calcutta. Besides the extensive nature of his general practice in Calcutta, his public duties 
were by no means light. In addition to his appointment in the Hospital, he was Surgeon to the Cal- 
cutta Jail and the Upper Orphan School, and was unremitting in the discharge of the duties attached to 
those vocations. He attended the General Hospital at all hours of the day and night, and much of his 
valuable observations upon disease were drawn from the close attention which he paid to the cases under 
his charge in that Institution. 

The history of Mr. Twining's connection with the Medical Society is a subject which calls forth our 
admiration, mixed with a long train of melancholy reflections ; for it is impossible to look back with- 
out approbation upon the unceasing interest which he took in its welfare. Mr. Twining was amongst the 
earliest members of the Society, and from the beginning contributed with all his energy to promote its 



U ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

success. He was not, however, content with his own exertions in its favor. He induced all around 
him to labour in its behalf, and upon the death of the lamented Dr. John Adam, in 1830, he was 
chosen to fill the office of Secretary, a situation which he occupied with a degree of unremitting seal 
and attention almost without a parallel in the records of any other scientific body. But towards the 
end of 1834, he was, though most reluctantly, compelled to resign his office into the hands of Mr. 
Bramley ; for the extent of his other occupations, so absorbed his time, that he found himself unable 
to continue the duties of that department. He nevertheless relaxed not in his strenuous exertions in 
the Society *s behalf. 

In the course of the last ten years, Mr. Twining furnished the Society with a great number of papers 
upon various subjects ; upwardis of twenty of these have been published. Their publication was, how- 
ever, but the prelude to a work on a far more extensive scale, in the preparation of which Mr. Twining 
was for some time engaged. In August 1832, his admirable book upon the diseases of Bengal was 
announced. The reputation which the author had previously attained, and the high respect alroidy felt 
for his opinions, by his professional brethren throughout India, excited intense expectation on the 
merits of ^e forthcoming treatise ; its appearance was haUed with eagerness and delight ; nor was the pub- 
lie disappointed ; for it contained all that was looked for, and was unanimously declared to be the most 
important work upon Indian diseases ever promulgated. 

In 1833, he published, through his Booksellers in England, a separate work upon cholera, which was 
favorably received by the British public. Mr. Twining's fame and reputation were much increased 
throughout all India, and extended themselves even to Europe, by the production of his work "On 
the Diseases of Bengal." So impressed were the members of the Supreme Government with its im- 
portance, that, with great liberality, they contributed fifteen hundred rupees towards the expense of its 
printing and publication. The first edition sold rapidly, and the 'author was soon forced to make pre- 
parations for bringing out a se<;ond, with many additional observations, and new chapters, which very 
much increased the value and usefulness of the work ; in June 1835 it was published, and most warmly 
received by the public. The Government again came forward upon this occasion, and in a very hand- 
some manner, marked their sense of the value of the author's labours by taking 200 copies of the 
work, with the intention of distributing them throughout the Medical Service. 

With the publication of this edition of his work, Mr. Twining's brilliant career was about to close. 

On the 19th August, as Mr. Twining was visiting his patients, his coachman drove against a huggy 
and overturned it ; a gentleman who was in it, was thrown violently on the ground, and his thigh was 
fractured ; Mr. Twining instantly ran to assist the woimded man, and with the aid of a passenger, 
lifted him into a palanquin. In doing this, he felt something give way in his chest with a suddoi 
snap, and instantly became sick and faint. Throughout the whole of his subsequent illness, he was per- 
fectly calm and self-possessed ; reasoning on his case with clearness and judgment. During the first 
two days he took an unfavorable view of its termination, but the only thing which appeared to distress 
him, was the remembrance of his wife and child ; of them he could never speak, without the deepest 
emotion. 

The history of the case however, appears to point out the rupture of a large blood vessel, conse- 
quent upon a severe affection of the heart. He had for some time previous to his death labored under 
symptoms which marked the existence of a disorder in that organ ; and he himself frequently expressed 
his conviction that such was the fact. 

Mr. Twining was of a middling stature, but his figure was remarkably strong and robust ; his coun- 
tenance was intelligent and thoughtful, but very mild, and there was a general expression of benevolence 
diffused over it which was extremely prepossessing. In manners, he was very retiring and quiet, almost 
resembling a member of the Society of Friends, in his appearance and deportment, exhibiting, at the 
same time, a great share of the kindness and warmth of heart, which he naturally possessed. He 
was at all times singularly temperate and abstemious in his habits ; a rigid water-drinker, in example 
as well as precept ; he regarded indulgences of the table of every kind, as unpardonable offences in a 
man, who wished to preserve his health, and more especially with reference to hot climates. Mr. 
Twining's whole character was marked by a large proportion of that benevolence which was stamped 
upon his countenance, and it was nowhere more conspicuous than in the unwearied kindness and 
attention with which he regarded the sick of all ranks and descriptions who were placed under his care. 
In domestic life, he was most affectionate : indeed it formed for hun the greatest attraction of social 
existence. 

. As a writer, Mr. Twining was clear, forcible, and unpretending. His observations were well 
arranged, his mode of reasoning fair and very accurate. His style of composition was plain and con- 
cise, without any attempt at ornament or fine writing ; but far from being clumsy» dull, or oon- 
Strained. 

The mournful impression caused by Mr. Twining's decease was universal. He was so well known, 
so much beloved by many — and so highly valued by all, that the death of no one individual in Uie 
country could have created more profound grief, or produced a greater sensation of public Sjrmpathy. 
His remains were interred in the South Park Street Burial Ground, and the Inscription which marks 
his grave will be found amongst those in that Ground. A large sum of money was subscribed by his 
patients and friends for the purpose of erecting a Monument to his memory in St. John's Church, 
(of which the following is the copied Inscription) : 

In grateful recognition 

of bene6ts derived from the successful application of professional ability, 

and in testimony of respect and esteem for modest worth and active pbilantnropy, 

This Tablet, erected by his f riends and patients, is consecrated to the memory of 

IXTilliam Twininr, 
C.R. C.L S 
Obut Augt. 25th« 1836, Aged 46. 



ST, JOHN'S CHURCH. 25 

The following Inacripiion U copied from a hatuUome white Marble Monument placed close to the 
8, B, entrance of Si. John's Church. 

I'his Monument is erected 
by Sir David Ochterlony, and the officers of 
the army under liis command, 

to tlie memory of 
Lieutenant Peter Ziamrtie, 
of the Corps of Engineers in the army of Bengral : 
who, at the age of twenty-three, at the close of the first CampaisTn ot the Napaul War ; 

to the successful termination of which his exertions had eminently contributed : 
Fell a victim to his devotion in the service of his country, 
Beloved, respected, and admired. 
Obiit. Anno. MDCCCXV. 



On the North qfthe Church altar are the two following Inscriptions ;— 

To the Memory of 
Treror John Chicheley Plowden, 

An affectionate husband and father. 

An uprigrht public servant, and virtuous citizen ; 

who for thirty years worshipped God in this Church. 

'J'his simple memorial of love and respect, 

is erected by his wife and children. 

Born on the 4th of June, 1784, died 7th July 1836. 

''Thou has tu rued my heaviness into joy: I'hou hast put off my sackciotii aud ginlcd me with glad* 

iies8."~Ps. XXX. 12 V. 



To the Memory of 
Sir Charles IVilliam Blunt. Baronet, 
who departed this life at Pultah, on the 29th day of September 1802, 
In the seventy-second year of his age. 

The following is copied from « handsome White Marble Monument t in the N. E, entrance of St, 
John^s Church: 

To the Memory of 
Alexander Colvin. 

This tablet is erected by the Merchants of Calcutta ; 
who having for forty years witnest>ed in him an union of those talents and virtues, 

which best adorn their profession. 

And do most honor to a character in private life. 

Thus record their afTectiouate esteem for him whilst liviiif?, and their sorrow for his death. 

Born Illrd April. A.D. MDCCLVI. 
Died XVih December, A. D. MDCCCXVllI. 



THE HONORABLE JOHN AD\U—Oate Governor General of India) . 

John Adam was the eldest son of the Right Honorable William Adam, Lord Chief Commissioner 
of the J^ry Court for Civil Caiwes in Scotland, and the Honorable Eleanor Elphinstone, second 
daughter of Charles, tenth Lord Elphinstone, and was born on the 4th May 1779. lie was educated 
on the foundation of the Charter House, and being presented by his uncle with a Civil appointment to 
Bengal in 1794, was sent, for a year, to Edinburgh, where he attended the lectures of Dugald Stewart, 
Professor Robison and other distinguished literary instructors of that period. Mr. Adam finally sailed 
for India in the * Barrington,' along with his cousin, the Hon. Mountstuart Elphinstone (afterwards 
Governor of Bombay) and arrived at Calcutta in February 1796. His first nomination was in the 
judicial branch of the service, and he was sent to Patna to serve his probationary term under Mr. 
Henry Douglas, then Judge and Magistrate of that station. Here he remained for three years, employed 
in the study of the languages of the country, and in the sedulous discharge of those minor duties by 
which the junior servants of the Company are trained to official habits, and fitted for the high career 
to which they are destined. In March 1799, Mr. Adam was promoted to the office of Register in the 
Twenty-four Purgunnahs, in the Presidency district ; and having been introduced to the personal notice 
of the Governor General, he was, in the following year, transferred to the judicial and revenue branch 
of the Secretariat, wherein he was nominated head assistant. 

Marquis Wellcsly had recently returned to Bengal upon the conclusion of the Mysore war, and was, 
at this time, occupied with the formation of a Council to the College of Fort William ; Mr. Adam was 
one of the very first selected for this distinguished position. In May 1802, he was placed at the head 
of the office in question, and vested with the charge of its records ; and in March of the following year 
his services were rewarded by a nomination to the office of Collector in one of the districts (Goruckpore) 
then recently ceded by the Nawaub Vizier. It was not, however, Lord WcUesly's intention to deprive 
himself of the useful talents of his assistant ; he accordingly retained Mr. Adam in his suite until his 
final departure for Europe ; and Sir George Barlow, having, in April 1804, made him Deputy 'Secretary in 
the Serect, Political and Foreign Departments, took occasion to record a minute explanatory of the cause 
of his not joining the station to which he had been appointed, bearing therein a most honorable testimony 
to the useful services rendered by Mr. Adam in the Secretariat, more especially during the course of 
the Marhatta war. 

In March 1809 Mr. Adam was appointed, by Lord Minto, Secretary to Government in the Military 
Department, an office which required the qualifications of a thorough man of business, and which he 
possessed in a pre-eminent degree. Occupied sometimes with the discussion of projects affecting the 
most momentous interests of the State, he possessed on the one hand that intelligence of mind which 

£ 



26 *8T. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

diflcrimmates between the sound and the fidlacioas ; whilst, on the other, he could derote himielf 
with the most exemplary diligence, and witiiont any sensation of fitttgae or disgost, to the dullest 
accumulation of uninteresting details. The records of the Supreme Goremment contain more than ono 
acknowledgment of the admirable manner in which the duties of this office were performed by Mr. 
Adam. 

Upon Mr. Edmonstone's promotion to a seat in the Supreme Council in October 1812, Mr. Adam 
succeeded him in the more responsible and higher office of Secretary to Government in the Secret, 
Foreign and Political Departments, and it was in Ihis situation that Lord Hastmgs found him on hit 
arrivfd in India in the following year. In this situation it became the duty of Mr. Adam to point oat 
to the new Grovemor-General the political objects most deserving of his attention ; to ascertain his 
views, and assist in their development, besides that of finally becoming the organ for communicating 
them to others. Mr. Adam, accompanied the Governor General, as Secretary, throughout the opera- 
tions now about to commence, and, so fur as his voice had weight, influenced the resolution finally 
taken by his Lordship, to adopt, upon his sole responsibility, an extensive plan for establishing BritiBh 
supremacy over the whole of Indda. Mr. Adam was the sole depository of his Lordship's views, and 
exclusively enjoyed his confidence ; so much so, that the instructions for the movement of every corpSy 
sometimes extending even to the details of its formation and equipment, issued entirely under his sig- 
nature. The labour and anxieties of that period can be known only to those who witnessed Mr. Adsjoi 
under the discharge of his accumulated duties ; late in the night, when all were at rest, the lamp was 
constantly burning in his tent, while kasids and estafettas Vere waiting to carry forth his expresses ; 
again, though ^e march was always made before daybreak in the morning, he was nevertheless 
beforehand, and at the desk with his candles, to snatch a few minutes for some urgent business ere the 
drum should beat the final order for a move. It is to be observed that, in addition to the functions 
of the Political and Secret Departments, Mr. Adam filled the situation of Private Secretary to the 
Governor- General ; so that he had another branch of duty to perform, in its nature urgent and distinct 
from that which mainly occupied his thoughts ; but consisting of confidential correspondence, regarding 
the distribution of patronage, or of communications with the principal functionaries at the Presidency, 
and therefore not admitting of transfer or delegation to other huids. The strongest frame of body must 
have yielded to the fatigue and anxiety of such accumulated labours, continued, as they were, for 
so long a period without intermission, Mr. Adam's constitution was originally extremdy good ; a 
long career, however, of sedentary and incessant occupation in the climate of India had alr^uly so fiur 
weakened it as to have rendered a voyage to the Cape indispensible a few years before. His frame, there- 
fore, was not proof against the effect of such unremitting cares as were now heaped upon him, and Uie 
seeds were unfortunately sown, during the campaign, of the disease which ultimately carried him off, 
and deprived the world of his virtues and useful talents when they had scarcely ripened to full maturity. 
But we have not yet done with the recapitulation of Mr. Adam's claims to &e lasting gratitude of the 
country, to the service of which indeed, his life was devoted. Though the remainder of his days were 
short, and passed in sickness, the period was yet eventful, and crowded with actions for which his 
name will be long remembered and cherished with affection. 

In April 1817, the Court of Directors, in acknowledgment of Mr. Adam's prior services, had nomi- 
nated him provisional Member of Council, and the departure of Mr. C. Ricketts for England enabled 
him to take his seat, very soon after the return of the Governor- General to the Presid^cy upon the 
conclusion of the Mahratta and Pindarry war, viz. on the 9th of January 1819. As a Member of Coun- 
cil, Mr. Adam's character was conspicuous for solid sense, and for the close discriminating judgment 
he had ever at command for all questions. 

On the 13th of January 1823, Mr. Adam took charge of the Supreme Government. Elevated thus 
temporarily, and almost by accident, to the highest station ; placed in a situation of vast power, and con- 
scious of possessing the talent to wield it beneficially, he determined to do all the good he could ; 
imwilling that the period of his sway should be marked as a mere interregnum, distinguished only for 
the absvice of energetic measures, a pure blank space, as it were, between two administrations ; nor did 
he think it either generous or consistant with the line of public duty, to shift off upon his successors the 
odium, risk, and res])onsibility of executing what his own judgment pronounced to be right. 

There was no branch of public policy to which Mr. Adam attached more importance than the educa- 
tion of the people ; his attention was sedulously directed to the important subject of public instruction, 
in furtherance of which object public aid had been afforded to ^ose useful and laudable institutions, 
the School Book Society, die Calcutta School Society, and the Hindoo College, founded in 1817. 
Besides thus extending the support and countenance of Government to Institutions directed to the moral 
improvement of the country, Mr. Adam took the same occasion for setting apart a fund for public 
works, tending to the increase of the people's comfort and convenienoe. For this purpose, the town 
duties collected at the principal cities and stations jpresented themselves as in every respect the most 
appropriate resource ; the total amount being such as Govemm^ could sacrifice without inconvenienoe, 
while the distribution was ready made, in the proportion levied from the population of each pUce. 

This however is not all. The administration of civil justice, which is the first duty of a regular 
Government ; indeed, the condition by which it acquires the title, was very inadequately provided for, 
from the insufficiency of the existing European Establishments. The above are some of the most promi- 
nent measures of Mr. Adam's short administration of seven months. But matters were not yet 
brought to the issue to call for the practical application of these principles, when Lord Amherst arrived 
and assumed the Government. Mr. Adam was obliged, by the growing strength of the disease 
(a dysentery) which bad been preying on his constitution for several years, to proceed to sea for his 
recovery ; he thus hod no part in ^e subsequent measures of the Government. 

He remained at this Presidency until the middle of September, for the purpose of introducing his 
successor. Lord Amherst, to a knowledge of the affairs requiring his most immc^Uate care. His public 
life may be fairly stated to have closed with his government on the Ist of August 1823, for what 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 27 

remains to be told is only the melancholy tale of an increasing infirmity, for which he hi vain sought 
relief — first in a voyage, by sea, to Bombay ; then in a land journey through Central India, during 
the bracing months of January and February ; and, finally, in a residence, for the hot season, in the 
mountains conquered from the Nipaulese. All was however, fruitless : the disease was too firmly rooted 
in his constitution to yield to change of air, relaxation, or any other remedy that could be applied in 
India. Returning at the close of the ensuing rains, a consultation of medical men was held at Ga- 
zeepoor, on the Ganges, who gave it as their decided opinion that there was no hope but in a voyage to 
Europe. Mr. A. then came down to Calcutta for the purpose of embarking, in a state of weakne!*8 that 
prevented his again taking his seat at the Council table, or even admitting the visits of his most intimate 
and dearest friends. A passage was engaged for him in the * Albion,' Captain Swainson, which finally 
sailed for Liverpool on the 16th April 1825 ; but the hand of death was upon him, and he did not live 
to revij^it the land of his fathers, or to gladden the hearts of his family who doted on him with an 
affection unknown to those who have not a son or brother who has wrought for himself the same 
high claims to love and veneration. Mr. Adam died off Madagascar on the 4th June, and when the 
vessel arrived without him, many, indeed, were the hearts in which a mournful blank was left by the 
intelligence. Public tokens of the high esteem and respect in which his character was held, and of the 
regret universally felt at the loss, have not been wanting to grace his memory, but this can afford little 
consolation to the many who enjoyed his friendship and who were attached to him by ties they can 
never transfer to another ; while to his family, whose affection had been for years feeding in absence 
on the report of his fame and virtues, and a fondly-cherished hope that he would be restored to their 
embraces and society in the maturity of his years and honors — all these additional testimonies of his 
value were but aggravations of the affliction with which that hope was to be abandoned for ever. 

In every relation of life Mr. Adam was amiable in a very rare degree ; and this was acknowledged, 
not only by those who, participating in his society and counsels, felt the influence of his character in the 
warmth of their own feelings ; but by those also who saw him at a greater distance, and were even 
opposed to him in political sentiment. A most gratifying proof of this was afforded on the occasion of 
his relinquishing the Government, and preparing for the voyage to Bombay, from which he then expected 
a partial, if not entire restoration to health. 

A full-length portrait of Mr. Adam is placed in the Town Hall ; the picture has been well executed 
by G. Chinnery, and is indeed a faithful memorial of features, which cannot be looked upon without 
reverence and affection ; for they carry in them the aspect of virtue united to high talent, and blended 
with a mild unassuming dignity of dci)ortment, such as cannot fail to rivet the attention of a stranger 
even to Mr. Adam's fame and merit. Mr. Adam's public character h&s been best described by the 
relation of the principal circumstances of his public life, the attachment of his friends — of whom to the 
last day of his existence, the number was constantly increasing, without the loss of a single one of those 
previously gained, is the best test of his private virtues. There never was an individual in whom the 
qualities which form an estimable, useful, and distinguished man in public life, were more happily 
blended with those which engage the affections of mankind in private intercourse ; frank, sincere and 
open-heartud, his manners had a bewitching simplicity that banished restraint, and won their way to 
immediate esteem and confidence. He was blessed also with a cheerfulness of disposition and suavity 
of temper, which nothing could ruffle or interrupt : and, to crown the whole, his temperament was so 
truly social and his heart so thoroughly kind, and he returned the affections of others with so ready a 
warmth, that all who a))proached him found their early regard kindle rai)idly into a sincere and lasting 
friendship. His charities were most extensive, and the real benevolence displayed, as well in tlie 
manner, as in the liberality with which his assistance was afforded, might furnish a copious theme of 
eulogy ; for many are the traits of this description with which every one who has lived with him in 
India must be familiar. With such a disposition, it cannot be wondered at that his fortune, on leaving 
the country, should have been so small as barely to yield him a competency, though personally a man 
of no expensive habits and without family. Such, however, was the case, notwithstanding the very 
splendid career of service he had run ; but Mr. Adam's reward is in the reputation he has left behiTid 
him, and in the sentiment of gratitude and admiration with which his name will ever be inseparably 
linked. 

To the memory of John Adam, eldest son of The Right Honorable William Adam, 
Lord Chief Commissioner of the Jury Court in Scotland. 
He arrived in Bengal, 1796, 
And passed throusrh the highest offices in the Civil Service of the East India Company. 
Placed in the supreme Council in 1819, he was agr^^in appointed 
to that station when the usual term of holding it had expired. 
From January to August 1823, he acted as Governor of India : 
Bad health compelled him to embark for England in March 1825, 
but he died on the 4th June, in the 47th year of his age, and his remains were committed to the ocean. 
His indefatigable zeal, and exemplary inteflrrity ; the firmness of his conduct ; 
his elevated views, and the wisdom of his measures ; 
have been recorded by the Supreme Council of Bengal, 
and by those who preside over the affairs of India, in England. 
The modesty of his demeanor, his cultivated and 
intelligent conversation, the kindness of his nature and active benevolence 
will long be cherished in the hearts of those who dedicate this marble to his virtues. 

Nejct to which are the following Inscriptions : — 

'i'his Cenotaph, 

raiscil by the liaml of an affectionate uncle, bean* record of the high talents and many virtues 

of his nephew, Lieut.- Colonel John IVeston, of the Bengal Military Establishment. 

He died deservedly lamented in the prime of life, on his vovasre from Prtuce of VValcs' Island to Calcutta, 

Anno Domini M UCCCXIX. 
E 2 



28 ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

1 u the memory of Axkdrew Stirllnff^ 

second <$on of Admiral Stirllafjr, of Woburri lann, in tUu County of Surry, 
who died at this Frcsiilency on the 23rd uf May, 1830, in the 3(>th year of his Bge. 
Mr. Stirling held the ofHces of Peniian Secretary to Government, 
and Deputy Secretary in the Secret and PoUtical Department. 
Tliroughout his career in hfe. he was not only eminently distingruisned by great taleDts^ 
hut by urbanity of manner.*), and excellence of disposition. 
While his loss as a public servant will be felt by (Jovernnient, 
His private virtues will be cherished by a numerous circle of acquaintance 
who loved him for his worth and admired him for his great acquirements. 
This Tablet is erected by his father, as a tribute of afTectioa 
to the memory of a much beloved and much lamented soo. 



CT^e following is an extract from one of the periodicals of the day^ respecting the character and high 
attainments of the late Mr, Stir ling. J 

*' Distingaished as Mr. Stirling^ was by talents and acquirements of rare excellence ; possessing as 
he did in an especial degree, the qualities that fit for the most arduous duties of public life ; and marked 
as his career had been by an eminently beneficial and successful application of hia powers to some of 
the most important and difficult exigencies of the public service, there is little doubt that, had it 
pleased Providence to prolong his life, he would eventually have attained still higher offices and honours 
than those which he held, with equal credit to himself, and advantage to the Government he so zealously 
and ably served. 

Familiar at once with the general principles that regulate Political affairs, and with the varied and 
intricate circumstances in this country to be weighed in the adjustment of Diplomatic relations ; he 
was at the same time thoroughly master of all the peculiar and conventional forms of Oriental reg^ulation 
and intercourse ; and he added to these a patience, a temper, a tact, and peculiarly engaging urbanity 
of manner, which gave them the most successful effect. Nor was his usefulness confined to the depart- 
ment to which he more immediately belonged. In all branches of the Civil administration of the 
country, he had frequently had the opportunity of affording the Government and his colleagaes the 
benefit of extensive knowledge, and of sound and comprehensive views. 

Mr. Stirling, (like most minds of a superior order) by an assiduous economy of time, satisfied the 
claims of business and routine, and found leisure to bestow time on the cultivation of general science, 
and elegant literature. Were it possible, in such a hasty notice as tliis, we could shew that, for the 
former particularly, he had a deep but an unostentatious enthusiasm. 

The death of such men in the prime of life must be severely felt, especially by that circle of whidi 
they were the ornaments. Of Mr. Stirling's private virtues, however, it is not our purpose to speak in 
this place. They live in the cherished recollection of many among us who loved him for his worth, 
and admired him for his talents and acquirements. 

To the Junior members of the distinguished service to which he belonged, he has left the benefit of 
an example they would do well to imitate, — of conduct based upon the highest principles ; of a life of 
uniform, and great utility ; of unsullied rectitude ; dignified application and honorable fame." 

He expired on the evening of the 23d May 1830, ^ter ten days illness. 

His remains were placed in a leaden coffin and followed to the grave by a large concourse of mourn- 
ing friends, European and Native ; amongst the latter were observed almost the whole of the distinguished 
Native Princes, Nabobs, Rajahs and others. 

f The following is taken from a large handsome Marble Monument f surmounted with Militeary 
and trophies^ near the N, W, Staircase of St. John^s Church :—J 

This Cenotaph was erected by the Neemutch Field Force, 

in honor of their commander, 

Lieut.-Colonel John Ziudlo^ C. B. 

This distinguished officer entered the Bengal Army on the 16th February 1796, 

and his career was marked by an ardent devotion to the duties of a soldier ; 

a generous enthusiasm and unabating zeal, which shed a lustre on the profession to which he belonged. 

By his heroic intrepidity in the arduous contest 

between the British troops and those of the Kajah of Napat, in the years 1814 and 1815, 

he obtained the unqualified approbation of the Supreme Government of India, 

and the Honors of the Bath from his Sovereign. 

His life fell a sacrifice to the energry of his spint which led him into the field at the head of his division, 

whilst suffering under a painful and dangerous illness, under which he sunk, in Camp, at Barode, 

on the 22nd of September 1829, in the 44th year of his age. 

Just and inflexibly firm, yet temperate and mild in the exercise of his authority. 

He ensured the respect, whilst be conciliated the attachment of the Troops under his command. 

The virtues that adorned his private life endeared him to his family and friends, 

by whom he was sincerely esteemed and beloved ; 

and who, whilst they unfeignedly mourn his loss, warmly cherish his remembrance. 

Next to the above is the following Tablet : — 

Sacred to the memory of 
IValter Niabet, Esq. of the Bengal Civil Service \ 
who, though dead, still liveth io the recollection of his sorrowing relatiofts, and of those 
numerous friends, whose attachment he conciliated, during twenty-three years' residence in Calcutta. 

Obiit. October 11 Anno Dom. 1833, .^.tat Suae 43. 

" Thanks be to God who giveili us the victory through Jesus Christ." 

This Tablet is erected by his surviving brothers and sisters, 

as a joint tribute of their grateful affection, and in testimony of his acknowledged worth. 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 29 

On the left of the JVettem entrance: 

Sacred to the memory of 

Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Haiprtrey, 

commanding^ the 3rd Bengal Light Cavalry, 

died 7th of July 1833. aged 49 years. 

I'his Tablet is placed in St« John's Church as a mark of resi>ect and esteem by the officers of lib Corps. 



(The following Monuments of white marble are to be teen on the Southern wing of St. John's 
Church.J 

In memory of 
Gkori^e Cmttenden, 

late Major in the Honorable E. L Company's Bengal Army, 

whose long term of Military Service, fulfilled with every mark of good desert, 

was followed by an active part in civil life, pursued with equal talent and integrity. 

His Christian temper, and sound principles, 

his love for others, and his friendly dispositions, 

took their Brst course in the nearest circles of attachment, but they knew no limit ; 

that he lived where his virtues found their just reward. 

This Monument, raised with emulous aifection speaks for many. 

He died at Macao on the 23d of March 1822, Aged 54. 



By time's sure test in varied stations schooled, 
God claimed the heart ; and that first tribute paid, 
Wide flowed the stream, one generous purpose ruled 
The soldier's duties, and the toib of Trade. 

O, keep the record, keep it, friendly stone ! 
Nor yield it, but to register above ; 
Till heaven's high Lord shall gather for his own 
I'he kind and true, the stewards of his love. 

I'ell, faithful stone, for many a circling year. 
True to thy trust his worth and kindness tell : 
Bid those who tread these courts, and linger here, 
Bid them respect a name sustained so well. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

James Barwell, Esquire, 

Son of the late Richard Barwell, Esouire, of Transtead Park, Sussex. 

The best qualities of head and heart combined alike to distinguish his public and private life. 

Sub-Treasurer of this Presidency for 16 years, he discharged the duties of that respoasible othce 

with firmness, rectitude, and ability, equal to 

every emergency, whilst his modest unaffected worth 

conciliated the love and respect of all who knew him. 

** Rich in good works" and patiently resigned to the Divine will. 

He expired after a long and painful illness, on the 16th of April 1B33, aged 49 years. 



(The following is from a beautiful white Marble Tablet placed in the South Gallery of St. John's 
Church :—) 

Consecrated to the Memory of 

CliarleB Ziionel Sho'weni, Esq. 

Senior Captain of the 19th Regiment Bengal Infantry, 

who in the assaults of the fortified heights of Malown, on the 

15th of April 1815, led one of the principal columns to a separate attack, in the most gallant style, 

And gloriously fell at its head just when in personal conflict 

he had with his own hand slain the chief of the enemy. 
In the various duties of life, as a man, soldier, and a Christian, 
the eminent qualities of the amiable and lamented Showers conspicuously shone. 
Firm in honor, sincere in friendship, ardent in his professional duties, 
and humble and fervent in those of a higher nature : 
The prominent features of his character were benevolence, zeal and piety, 
and his deserved portion, was the love, the esteem, and the resfiect of all who knew him. 
To record their deep sense of his worth, and their heartfelt concern for his loss \ 
the officers of^he 19th Regiment have caused this monument to be 
erected in affectionate remembrance of their valued and regretted comrade. ii£tat 35. 
On the same occasion, in the gallant execution of his duty. 
Fell Lieut Hnmphrey Bagot, of the same Regt. iEtat 25* 
And in the same cam paign , equally honorable. 
Fell Lieut. Edward WUson Broo^htony 
of the same Regiment, yEtat 26. 



(On the North Gallery ^ is thefollotcing Inscription :— :> 

Sacred to the memory of 

Captain B. A. McNaghten, 

late of the 6lst Regiment Bengal Native Infantry, 

who departed this life I8th May 1845, aged 49 years. 

This tablet is erected by the officers of the Regiment as a slight tribute to departed worth. 



30 ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

Tke/bllwfinff trill be 9een on the riff hi and l^ qfthe Wettem entrance itf 8t, Jokn'e Church .—• 

Sacred to the Memory of Qe or ge Palmer, Esquire. 
Tliis tablet is erected to the memory of one of the best husbands, by his afflicted widow. 

No man possessed a more kind or benevolent heart. 
In manners plain, in council wise, in judi^ment uprig'ht, in piety and charity unostentatious ; 
In all the relations of husband, father and friend, exemplary and beloved. 
He departed this life at Purneah, September 10th, 1840, 
leaving, as the noblest monument to his memory and the richest legucy to his wife and childreoy 

the imperishable record of a good name. 
" Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord." — Rev. xiv. 13. 



Sacred to the memory of Captain and Brevet Major John Oriffin, 
of the 24th Regiment Bengal Native Infantry, 
who fell in the action foufrht between the British IVooim and Seikhs at Ferozeshoh, 

on the 21st December 1845, aged 47 years. 
This tablet is erected by his brother oHicers, as a mark of their 
admiration of his character as a soldier and as a token of their affection for him as a friend. 



Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant and Adjutant Robert Harvey Tumbnll, 
of the 24th Regt. Bengal Native Infantry, who was killed in action with Uie Chours 

on the 1st of January 1833 ; ^tatis Sui 25. 
This Tablet is erected by his brother ofHcers as an unaffected tribute to 
departed worth ; and in testimony of their sincere regard. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Colonel IV. C. FaithAal, 

who departed this life at sea on the 16th of March 1838, ag^ 55. 
During the long period of 35 years of Military service in India, 
he was conspicuous for zeal and ability in the performance of his duties ; 
engaged often on active service in the field with houorable distinctions, 

and on two occasions severely wounded. 
This memorial is erected by his afflicted widow and children. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain John Martin, 41st Regt N. I. 

who was unfortunately drowned on board the ship *' Protector*' in a gale 

off the Sandheads on the 19th of October 1838, aged 38 years. 

This tablet has been erected by a sincere friend, who appreciated his many worthy and estimable qualities. 

Sacred to the memory of 

John Henry Barlo^ Esq. 

of the Beogral Civil Service ; 

third son of Sir George II. Barlow, Bart. G. C. B. 

He served the state for a period of 27 years, 

his life exhibiting a rare harmony of the quaUties of mind and heart, 

tliat stamp their chief value on official, private and Christian character. 

Bom December 7th, 1795, 

Died at ConUi Hidgilee, Uth September, 1841. 

•* Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace."— Ps. xxxvii. 37, 

CAdJoininff the North Gallery staircase of St, John's Church are the following Inscriptions: ) 

In memory of 
Riehard Vaujghan, Taxing officer. 
Chief Clerk of the Insolvent Court, 
Keeper of the Records and Muniments, and Receiver of the Supreme Court : 

Died at Calcutta 3Ut July, 1843. 

In testimony of affection and regret, this Tablet l<t dedicated to the memory of 

Oeorg^ Cracroft Aubert, 

who on the evening of the 29lh of April, 1843, 
riding homeward from the residence of a friend, 
was overtaken by a sudden storm, and with the horse which bore him, was struck dead by lightning*. 

Aged 25 years. 
'* lie flourished as a flower of the field, the wind passed over it, and it was gone.'' 

BRIGADIER ANQUETIL.— rXfl/c in command of Shah Soojah^s Army.) 
Lieutenant. -Colonel Thomas John Anquetil, one of the many and noble victims of the Cabool 
Massacre, was a Native of the Island of Jersey, and is a Cadet of 1804, he was a man of studious habits. 
Tliere is an anecdote told by some of his shipmates that be used to study the Hindoostanee at the mast- 
head on his voyage to India. He was well acquainted with the Oriental language, as well as with the 
French. He served with distinction in the Mahrattah Campaign and was for a long period attached to 
the Light Brigade. His first command was that of the Pioneer cori)s. 

When that regiment was broken up he obtained the command of the 57th Regt. N. I. as Major, 
and from thence he was appointed to the command of his own Regiment, the 44th N. I. It was 
whilst in this command that he received a letter offering him the Deputy Adjutant Generalship of the 
Army. Whilst on his way to the Presidency Lieut. -Colonel Anquetil was stopped at Cawnporc to assume 
the duties of Adjutant General of the force assembled under General Stevenson, and accompanied that 
force during the Shikawattie Campaign. At the termination of that duty he aMumed his office of Deputy 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. ^ 31 

Adjutant General of the army ; he was selected purely from the high character he bore, without interest 
or favoritism. He was an officer of undoubted ability, a thorough disciplinarian, and was highly 
versed in the science of military tactics. His private plans and military drawings shewed him to be a 
man thoroughly acquainted with his profession, and he wanted but a fair opening to have distinguislied 
himself in the highest military command. He was a warm-hearted man and possessed of the strictest 
integrity and the most honorable feeling, but he did not belong to a particular click in Calcutta, and 
there was some manoeuvering to get him out of the department in which he was then serving. This 
could only be done by offering him a better appointment and one more congenial with his feelings and 
habits. He was accordingly selected by Lord Auckland to the command of the Oude Contingent force, 
with the rank of Brigadier. Had he remained in the Adjutant General's department, he would have 
accompanied the army of the Indus under Sir John Keane, would have been a C.B. most probably, 
and would perhaps have been offered to share with the staff of that Army in the " Dourannie honors !" 
but such was not his lot ; he was, alas ! destined to bear a part in the late eventful scenes in Affghanis- 
tan, and there to terminate his honorable career, ere he had gained those honors which most assuredly, 
from his high qualities and talents he would have attained under more fortimate circumstances. But 
to return to the brief outline of his service. The high efficiency and superior discipline of the Oude force 
did not fail to arrest the attention of the authorities. He was appointed Inspecting officer of all the 
Contingents, and accordingly inspected the Bundlekund Legion, Scindiah's Contingent, and that of 
Kotah. It was during this tour that he was offered the command of Shah Soojali's Army, and he 
proceeded through the Punjaub to assume that command. As far as opportunity and time admitted, 
he introduced much order and many improvements in the Army, extensive and scattered as it was 
throughout Affghanistan. Such was the value which he always placed on the drill and internal economy 
of the several Regiments, that he took much pains in personally su}>erintending such important details. 
Some ill natured comparison to the acts of a Sergeant- Major appeared in the public prints, but this was 
far from his character ; he was quite the gentleman ; he insisted on duty being well done by all, but he 
never interfered beyond his proper sphere. He was a safe man and was infinitely above any thing that 
was undignified or unworthy of a high minded gentleman. During the disastrous events prior to the 
evacuation of Cabul, he was only second or third in command. But in the unhappy and fatal retreat, 
we had a glimpse of what he was capable. On succeeding to the chief command, '* he restored order 
where all was confusion. He kept the remnant of the fatal Army admirably together." At such a 
crisis no common mind could have done this, but he fell at Jugdulluk, and alter this all was disorder, 
desperation, annihilation. 

llius fell Brigadier Thomas John Anquctil, one of the most valuable and zealous officers of the 
Bengal Army. Without any disparagement to others, it is not unreasonable to surmise that since 
he had such influence over the European part of the force, the troops must have held him in much 
res})ect, and that had his life been spared he might have led a portion of the army onward in safety 
to Jallalabad. It is not possible to decide until after the ** investigation" has been made, what degree 
of responsibility falls on Anquetil for the share he may have borne in the capitulation at Cabul. Many 
conjectures may be formed, but this will be said by those who knew him, that he was the last man 
that would be likely to capitulate, and too experienced in Asiatic warfare to trust to the tender mercies 
of the treacherous Affghans ; treacherous to a proverb, throughout Asia. 

(The following tablet is placed near the Southern Staircase of St, John*s Church : — J 

To the memory of 

Lieut.-Colonel Thomas John Aaquetil, 44th Regt. B. N. I. 

who was massacred in the performance of hu» duly, during the insurrection at Jugdulluck, 

in Affghanistan, at Cabul, while comnianding Shah Soojah's force, on the l*2th January 1842, aged 60 years. 

He was a warm-hearted man, and possessed of the strictest integrity, and the most honorable feeling. 

Erected by his surviving son, Charles Anquetil. 

JAMES PATTLE, ESQ.-^(Ofthe Bengal Civil Service.) 

The late James Pattle, Esq., Senior Member of the Board of Revenue, and the oldest in the Bengal 
Civil Service, died at his residence in Chowringhee, on Thursday the 4th of September, 1845, in the 
69th year of his age. He had been suffering for a long period from a painful disease, which terminated 
in his death. He entered the Civil Service in the year 1790. Inconsequence of Mr. Pattle's own 
earnest request his funeral did not take place here, but his remains were sent to England and deposited 
in the Vault of his family at Camberwell. He lived respected and beloved. 

The following is inscribed on a Tablet on the Southern Wing of St. John's Church : — 

Sacred to the memory of James Pattle, of the Bengal Civil Service, Obiit. 4th Sep. A.D. 1845, ^tat 69. 
•' O be Thou our help in trouble, for vain is the help of man." — 60 Ps. II v. 

Also to Adeline, his Wile, 
who died at Sea on the 1 1th Nov. 1845, aged 52. 
" And all wept and bewailed her, but Jesus said, weep not^she is not dead but sleepeth.^' — Luke 8th c. 52 v. 

In token of the love of their sorrowing children. 



The following is the inscription on a handsome Monument placed in the Southern Wing of St, John's 
Church : — 

To the memory of Lieut.-Colonel James Achilles Kirkpatrick, 
of the Honorable East India Company's Military Establishment of Fort St. George, 
who, after 611ing the distinguished Station as Resident at the Court of Hyderabad upwards of nine years, 
and successfully conducting during that period various important negociations, 
Died at Calcutta 15th October 1805, aged 41 years. 
This Monument is erected by his afflicted father and brothers. 



32 ^ ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 

Transcendant art ! whose magric skill alone, 

Can soften rock and animate a stone. 

By symbol mark the heart, reflettt the head, 

And raise a livingr imagre from the dead ! 

Cease from these toits, and lend the chisers g^race 

I'o Klial viriuei courting^ your embrace, 

I'hcse relate his pride, his transport, and relief, 
A fatht^r's tears commemorate, with grief ! * 
Still while their genia! lustre cheers his breast, 
Kmits a my that points to blissful rest ; 
Hope built on Faith, afTectiou's balm and cure. 
Divinely whispers "Their reward is sure. "—[J. K.] 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL JAMES ACHILLES KIRKPATRICK. 

Lieut.. Col. James Achilles Kirkpatrick, was the son of Colonel Kirkpatrick, formerly of tiie 
East India Company's Military Service, at Fort St. George, and late of Keston, near Bromley, in Kent, 
and was bom A. D. August 1761. After receiving a liberal education at different respectable Senunaries, 
and at Eton, he was appointed to the military service of the East India Company, and proceeded 
in the year 1779-80, as a Cadet, to Madras. In 1778-9, the impaired state of his health compelled 
him to revisit hia native country, where, however, he remained but a short time, returning to India 
before the conclusion of the first war with Tippoo Sultan, in the second campaign of which he 
8erved with the rest^rve of the army, under the command of Lieut. -Colonel (Major General) Gowdie. 
Towards the end of 1793 he was appointed to the charge of the Garrison of Vizianagram, which he 
soon relinquished for the appointment of Persian translator to the detachment serving with his Highness 
the Nizam. In this situation he continued until October 1795, when, on tha»* death of Lieutenant 
William Stewart, he succeeded to the office of Assistant to the Residency at llydrabad, which was at that 
period filled by his brother, Colonel William Kirkpatrick, who being obliged early in the year 1797 to 
proceed to Bombay, and subsequently to the Cape of Good Hope, for the benefit of his health, the char^ge 
of the British interests at the Court of Hyderabad devolved on the subject of our present notice. 

It was during the period of his acting as Resident at the Court of Hyderabad that Captain Kirk- 
patrick had the honor, under the directions of the Marquis Wellesly, of ne^ciating and concluding 
with his Highness the Nizam the important treaty by which the alarming power and influence of France 
in the Deccan were completely annihilated, and that Prince was thus rendered an efficient ally of the 
Company and enabled to co-operate with effect in the war which was soon after produced by the perfidy 
and restless ambition of Tippoo Sultaun. Lord Mornington testified his approbation of this important 
and eminent service by appointing Captain Kirkpatrick to the vacant office of Resident at the Court of 
the Nizam, and by conferring on him the peculiar distinction of Honorary Aid-de-Camp to the GoTemor 
General. He was the first person on whom this honor was bestowed, though it has since extended to 
others. It may in a peculiar manner be said to have been instituted to mark and dignify the merits of 
Captain Kirkpatrick. 

In October, 1800, Captain Kirkpatrick, after a long and arduous negociation, succeeded in concluding 
a new treaty with the Nizam, whereby the political ties which connected the British Government and tht 
state of Hydrabad were drawn together more closely than before : while the money subsidy hitherto 
paid by his Highness in defrayment of the expences of the British Troops employed in the defence of 
his dominions, was commuted for the territories acquired by his Highness in consequence of the wars of 
1791-2, and 1799 with Tippoo Sultaun, which were now assigned in perpetual sovereignty to the 
Company. The sense entertained by Lord Wellesly of Captain Kirkpatrick's services on this important 
oc<;asion will best appear from the following copy of a letter from his Lordship to Captain Kirkpatrick, 
dated November 10th, 1800 :— 
Sir, 

** Since the commencement of my administration of the affairs of the British empire in India, frequent 
occasions have arisen at the Court of Hyderabad to require the exertions of address, firmness and 
perseverance on the part of the British Resident and on the success of the ncgociations entrusted to his 
management, the most important political interests of the Company in India have essentially depended. 
In all these instances your general conduct has afforded me the greatest degree of satisfaction, and 1 
now repeat, with pleasure, the public tribute of justice which I rendered to your eminent services in 
accelerating the destruction of the French influence at Hyderabad, in the year 1798, and in bringing the 
Nizam's forces into the field with so much promptitude and alacrity during the war in Mysore in 1799. 
The conclusion of the treaty of the 12th of October 1800 furnishes a confident expectation of the 
lasting security and permanent duration of the British power in the Deccan ; the service which you have 
rendered to the Company and to the British interests in India by your able and assiduous exertions 
throughout the course of the long and intricate ncgociations which preceded this important measure, 
demands my most cordial approbation and entitles you to the gratitude of the Company and of your 
country. 

*' 1 discharge a satisfactory part of my public duty in recording these sentiments on the proceedings 
of this Government, but the peculiar merit of your services and the great importance of the beneficial 
consequences which have flowed from yoursuccess will induce me to submit to the Court of Directors 
my earnest recommendation that you should be rewarded by some honorable mark of pubUc distinction. 

I am, Sir, &c. 
(Signed) Wellesly." 

In December 1800 Captain Kirkpatrick attained the rank of Major in the army on the Madras Esta. 
blishment. From this time nothing material occurred at the Court of Hyderabad, until April 1802, 
when Major Kirkpatrick concluded a treaty of commerce between the East India Company and his 
Highnetfs. By this treaty the merchants acquired for the first time a degree of security, and the trade of 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 33 

the two countries received an impulse that has since condnced essentially to the advantage of both. The 
difficulties experienced by Mi^or Kirkpatrick in accomplishing the beneficial measure, and consequently 
the merit of his success on the occasion, can only be duly appreciated by tliose who are acquainted with 
the extraordinary obstinacy, the profound ignorance of every true principle of commerce, and the fixed 
prejudices which usually prevail in Anaiic, and particularly in Mahomedan Courts, on almost every 
question of political economy. 

In the year 1803 the British Government was compelled, in defence of its own rights and those of its 
allies, (both of them invaded by the restless ambition of the confederated Mahratta chieftains, Dowlut 
Rao Scindeah, Raghojie Bhosillah, and Jeswunt Rao Holkar,) to appeal to arms. On this occasion 
the power of the Court of Hyderabad, stimulated by the unremitted exertions of the Resident, proved 
eminently useful, and contributed, in no small degree, to the speedy and glorious termination of the war 
in the Deccan. What considerably enhanced the merits of these efforts was, their being made in the 
midst of difficulties occasioned by the daily expectation of the Nizam's death, and consequent anxiety 
respecting a succession to the throne. His Highness actually died on the 6th of August, being only 
two days prior to the commencement of hostilities by the attack on and capture of Ahmednaghur. 
Owing however, to the prudent measures adopted by Major Kirkpatrick under the general direction of 
Lord Wellesly, Secunder Jah, succeeded to the vacant musnud of his father without the slightest 
opposition, and the energies of the new Government were immediately applied to a vigorous co-operation 
with the British forces against the common enemy. 

The favourable sentiments entertained by Lord Wellesly of Major Kirkpatrick 's conduct and ser- 
vices on this occasion, were signified to him by direction of his Lordship, in the following terms, 
contained in a letter dated 30th of March, 1804 : — 

" Lord Wellesly desires me to add, that as soon as the British troops are withdrawn from the field, 
and are returned to their usual stations, it is his intention to afford you a public testimony of his appro- 
bation of your conduct, during the late crisis of affairs ; and to recommend your services to tlie notice 
of the Court of Directors, and of his Majesty's Ministers. His Lordship will not loose sight of your 
claim to some mark of distinction to his Majesty's Government in England, and will not fail to urge 
your pretentions in the manner most likely to obtain for you those honors, to which he is of opinion 
you are entitled for your public services under his Lordship's administration, which he recommended 
strongly to the Government in England some years ago ; and which in his judgment have been withheld 
from you unjustly." 

In October 1804 Major Kirkpatrick was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, and in 
September of the following year he proceeded to Calcutta with the permission of the late Governor 
G^eral, Lord Comwallls, partly for the benefit of his health, which was somewhat impaired by his 
long Residence in Hyderabad, but chiefly for the purpose of conferring with his Lordship, on the 
political affairs of that Court. He reached Calcutta under the affliction of an alarming complaint with 
which he had been seized on his journey, and of which he died on the 15th of October 1805, after a 
short illness, in the 41st year of his age. 

In private life he was eminently distinguished for all those qualities which gain the esteem, fix the 
attachment, and secure the confidence of friendship ; and his numerous friends will long and deeply 
lament his premature death, with a sorrow which can alone be surpassed by that of his afflicted family, 
who have, in him, lost a relatioa beloved with the warmest tenderness and the purest affection. The 
high diplomatic situation in which he died, he had filled for a period of nine eventful years ; and it has 
been shewn, that, in the course of that time, he was success^ly employed under the direction of the 
Marquis Wellesly, in some of the most important negociations which took place during the wise, 
vigorous, and brilliant administration of that enlightened and illustrious Statesman. The recorded testi- 
monies of the zeal and talents which he displayed in his official character, are no less just than numerous ; 
and whUst they bestow on his memory ^e most honorable trjbute, they hold out to others the most 
encouraging example. 

In addition to public honors, the general respect entertained for his character was strongly testified 
by a numerous attendance of the principal European inhabitants of Calcutta at his funeral ; a respect 
which is greatly enhanced by the circumstance of his being in some measure a stranger in this settlement, 
and whi<^ therefore serves to shew the high estimation in which he was universally held. 

Lieutenant- Colonel Kirkpatrick was interred in the South Park Street Burial-ground. The Inscrip. 
tion on the Monument will be found inserted among those in the Cemetery. 



(Near the S. E. entrance of St, John's Church :J 

M.S. 
Qarini IToxLag, Armigeri, 
Juris Militaris apud exercitum Bengalensisam suromi interprctis. 
Qui LcBcuIi Hujus Militiam Christi Disciplina Condecoravit, 
virtutem fide arma Litteris humaoioribus. 
Litteras Humaniores. 
S. S. scriptuarum scientia ampliavit 
vir doctus. Probus integer persapieas Annos vixit low indies suis carior 
supremum Obiit Diem Prid non mart A. D. MDCCCXLI. 
Mooerentes spe tamen cum Leta 
Christi mentis freti, Posuerunt amici. 



31 OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 

REV. JOHN ZACHARIAH KIERNANDER, CFbumder qfthe Old, or Mmkm CkureMJ 



Rev. John Zachariali Kiemander, founder of the Old, or Mission Church, was bom on tfap 
2l8t of November 1711* at Akstad in Sweden, a place situated about 4 Swedish miles fktnn the 
great city of Lindkopingi in the province of East Gothland. He received the first mdimenta of 
Bcholadtic learning at the Gymnasium of Lindkojnng, but completed his education at the Univernty 
of Upeal. In his 24th year he became desirous of vbiting foreign Universities, and on obtaiiunf 
recommendatory letters and a passport, by the influence of his friends in Stockholm, he took bit 
passage through the Baltic to Stralsund, and from thence to Halle in Saxony, where he arrived on the 
17th of November 1735. He was favorably received at the University of Halle by Doctor Grothilf Angoat 
Frankc, who immediately appointed him Inspector of the Latin School, and afterwards favoured him with 
other benefices. Kiemander spent four years under the patronage of Dr. Franke when, having satisfied 
his youthful curiosity, he began to think of returning to Sweden, but at this very crisis a drcumstance 
occurred which took him from his native land for ever. The Society instituted at London for Promot- 
ing Christian Knowledge wrote to Dr. Franke, requesting him to recommend to them a proper person 
to be sent out as a Missionary to Cuddalore. Dr. Franke made the proposal to Kiemander, who, after 
some deliberation, accepted the vocation. On the 20(h of November 1739, he was ordained to the 
ministry. 

Mr. Kiemander immediately set out for London, where he arrived on the 25th of December. He 
was lodged at Kensington by his Majesty's chaplain, the Rev. Mr. Ziegenhagen,* and on the 29th 
introduced by that gentleman to the Society, who received him with a public welcome. 

Mr. Kiemander left England in the *' Colchester" Indiaman on the 29th of April 1740, and arrived 
at Cuddalore on the 2dth of August as colleague to the Rev. John Ernest Gueister, who was appointed 
to Madras in 1744, when the charge of Cuddalore devolved on Mr. Kiemander, who then had a congrega- 
tion of 154 persons left by Sartorious, a former Missionary, removed to Madras. Mr. Kiemander wh 
treated with the most polite attention by Admiral Boscawen, and the Government of Fort St. David. 
That Government put him in possession of the Portuguese Roman Catholic Church at Cuddalore, and 
at the same time expelled all Popish Priests from the Company's territories. 

On the 26th of November 1749, the day after the receipt of the Governor's order, the ESngliah, 
Tamulian and Portuguese congregation assembled to hear divine service, and a sermon in the three 
different languages, when the church was solemnly dedicated, and called Christ Church. 

The Mission prospered much under new hands ; Mr. K. was in the habit of going several times a-week 
to the villages to malce known the Gospel of Jesus Christ ; his congregation in Cuddalore increased to 
200 persons, and in the following year received an increase of 160 converts. 

About this period Mr. Kiemander was married to Miss Wendela Fischer, a lady of some property ; 
she was an amiable woman, an attached wife, and, being faithful to God, was a helpmeet for him in 
preaching the Gospel. With this lady he lived in happiness many years, and '* the Lord prospered 
his labours." 

On the 4th May 1758, Lieutenant General Count Lally took Cuddalore by capitulation ; Kiemander 
waited on that impetuous officer, who told him no Protestant missionary was then required at Cuddalore, 
but that he would grant him a passport to go to Tranquebar ; this was accepted, and on the 8th of May 
Mr. Kiemander arrived at the Danish capital, stripped of aU his property excepting a few articles of 
apparel. He was a man of ardent zeal, of great integrity, with a dauntless courage and decision of 
mind ; both he and his wife were devoted to the cause of their Lord and Saviour ; they had borne their 
trials together, supporting each other's faith in the midst of them, living as heirs together of the grace of 
life ; the blessing of God was upon them as they laboured in his service. Mr. K. was a man of polite 
address and handsome countenance, alike fitted to appear in the Court of a Nawab or in the hamlet of 
a Hindoo. On the 2d of the following June, Fort St. David fell also by capitulation to the arms of 
France, in consequence of which, as no immediate prospect appeared of the restoration of the £nglidi 
to Cuddalore, Kiemander tumed his eyes to Bengal, where the battle of Plassey, in the preceding year, 
had laid the foundation of an empire. 

On the 11th of September Mr. Kiemander left Tranquebar, accommodated by the munificenoe of 
the Danes, — ^the friends of the tme religion. On the 29th of the same month he arrived in Calcutta, and 
declared his intentions to the Government of establishing a Mission there. Governor Clive, Mr. Watts 
and the other gentlemen of the Council approved of and favored his propositions. 

Mr. Kiemander, on the 4th of November 1758, was blessed with a son. The reader may judge what 
a reception Mr. Kiemander met with in Calcutta, when he is told that Colonel Robert Clive, Mrs. 
Margaret Clive, Mr. William Watts, and Mrs. Frances Watts, stood sponsors for the child, who was 
named Robert William, in honor of his high sponsors. 

Mr. Kiemander opened the Mission School at Calcutta on the 1st of December 1758 ; on the 3l8t of 
December of the following year 175 children were received by him, 37 of which number he had pro- 
vided for. Mr. Kiemander at this time occasionally preached at Serampore, where the Danes, then in 
an infant settlement, had no chaplain. 

Mr. Kiemander was very graciously received in Calcutta by the Rev. Henry Butler and the Rev. 
John Cape, Chaplains at the settlement ; in the years 1758, 1759-'60 and '61, they procured him large 
subscriptions for carrying on the pious work he was engaged in, and assisted in his peculiar offices at 
a minister of the Gospel. Mr. Kiemander on the 9th of May 1761 was deprived ot his lady; the 
marriage was one of affection and never impaired by the bitter vicissitudes of life. She was a woman 



* I he same gentleman who died ia the year 1776, after being 53 years Chaplain to the Royal German 
Chapel at St. Jamea\ 



OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 35 

of piety and devoted to her husband, and she lived to see him admired and esteemed by all ; while his 
religion was steadfast in the midst of many snares. The succeeding year, the 10th day of February 1762, 
witnessed his onion with Mrs. Anne WoUey. In the year 1767 Mr. Kiernander was obliged to remove 
from the house left him by the Company for the use of his Church and school, and, in co-isequenoe, 
resolved to purdiase ground and bidld a Church at his own expense. In May of that year, and the 
27th of his Mission, he laid the foundation-stone of the present Mission Church. About this period the 
Court of the Emperor, Shah Alum, requested from Mr. Kiernander some copies of the Psalter and 
New Testament in the Arabic language ; he complied, and had the satisfaction to hear they were so well 
received by his Msyesty's Mallahs that he transmitted to Allahabad, where the Court was then held, all 
the Arabic Psalters and Testaments in his possession. 

As Mr. Kiernander was advancing in years he took two associates to assist him ; they were Romish 
Priests, who, on their arrival at Calcutta, made a public abjuration from the errors of Popery : the 
Rev. Mr. Bento de Silvestre and the Rev. Nanel Joze De Costa. These gentlemen drew on themselves 
the censure of the conclave of Goa, and a Romish Priest was sent from thence to Calcutta, to excommuni- 
cate them ; but his vain threats did not in the smallest degree effect the Protestant Mission at Calcutta. 
The Mission Church would have been completed in 1770, had not its progress been stopped by the death 
of the Architect.* The persevering Kiernander, by his own unremitting diligence, compensated in part 
for this misfortune. On the 23d December the sacred edifice was consecrated and nam^l Beth Tephilla, 
which in the Hebrew language signifies the House of Prayer ; the building cost the founder above 
60,000 Sicca Rupees, 1,818 only of which sum, had been presented in benefactions. Thus, after a 
lapse of fourteen years, Calcutta once more beheld an English Church, completed at the expense of a 
stranger 1 

As a piece of architecture Beth Tephilla cannot be compared to the old Church of St. John, des- 
troyed by the barbarians in 1756 ; one was founded by an individual, the other by the united charity 
of opulent merchants, in days when gold was plenty, labour cheap, and not one indigent European 
to be found in all Calcutta ! Existing authorities testify to the perfect composition of that temple, 
to which the Governor, on every Sunday, walked in solemn procession, attended by all the Civil 
Servants and all the Military off duty. We learn from a tradition handed down to us by Lady Russell, 
that the steeple of St. John's was very lofty and uncommonly magnificent. Mr. Kiernander wishing to 
make the Mission Church as lasting as possible, constructed it of the best materials. 

Mr. Kiernander lost his second lady in June 1773, after a continued sickness of six months; she 
left her jewels for the benefit of Beth Tephilla ; with the amount produced Mr. Kiernander founded a 
Mission School on his own ground, in the rear of the Church, capable of holding 250 children ; it 
was founded on the 7th of July 1773, and completed on the 14th of March 1774. About tfiis period 
the Rev. Mr. Diemar arrived to assist the Mission. In the year 1778 Mr. Kiernander began to expe- 
rience the frailties and infirmities of age, his sight fedled him ; and in 1782 he was obliged to submit 
to the painful operation of having his eyes couched ; that operation succeeded so well, that he was soon 
after able to write to the Society to congratulate them, ** on his happiness, in once mure being enabled 
to see the prosperity of the Mission.'' Lady Coote, when at Calcutta, attended and received the 
sacrament at the Mission Church. 

*' This good example," says the Missionary, ** is attended with a very happy influence and gives great 
encouragement to the congregation." 

In the year 1783 the Rev. Mr. Western Hulse, Chaplain to the late Sir Eyre Coote, on his return to 
Europe, made the Mission a present of 500 Sicca Rupees ; Mr. Kiernander himself give a thousand 
Rupees, and his son, Mr. Robert William Kiernander, gave 3,000 Rupees, the yearly interest of which 
was to be applied to the support of the Mission. 

Mr. Diemar this season returned to Europe. 

Here we must reverse the scene and prepare ourselves to behold more unpleasing prospects. In the 
year 1 786 a cloud of adversity was gathering over the hoary head of Kiernander ! He foresaw the ap- 
proaching calamity, and wrote to the Society in England, expressing a wish of going to London with his 
son, and earnestly soliciting them to send out another Missionary, lest his congregation should be forsaken 
and his Church shut up. This venerable patriarch was now in the 76th year of his age and the 47th of 
his Mission, an age at which, in any climate, the debilitated frame must feel severely the reverse oi 
fortune ; but how unspeakably severe must it be felt by one, who for a period equal to the ordinary 
life of man, had been accustomed to the gentle ease of India ! The hovering cloud burst in 1787, and 
the ruin of all his fortunes foliowed.f The Seal of the Sheriff of Calcutta was placed even on Beth 



* Mr. Martin Boutaot de Mevell, a Danish Architect. 

t It is generally known that Mr. Kiernander about this time became a bankrupt, and a kind of 
reproach has rested in consequence on the character of that eminent Missionary. Now the chief blame 
attaching to this holy man seems to have been an error of judgment, in advanced life, in signing bonds 
for his son, Mr. Robert Kiernander, and thus putting in jeopardy his property and usefulness. This 
son appears to have had charge of his father's concerns during three years that he was totally blind 
from cataract. He was a young, inexperienced person, and was drawn by various parties, some of 
them natives, to engage in building houses. The bonds for raising the money required, were most 
injudiciously signed by the venerable father, then between 70 and 80 years of age. An alarm took 
place amongst the young man's creditors, and his whole property with that of his father, was attached 
by the Sheriff, and sold at a ruinous loss. No writ was issued against the persons of Mr. Kiernander 
and his sou. They resigned at once all they had to the han<hi of their creditors, and retired to 
Chinsurah. 

Such appears the real extent of the fault of this great Missionary, to be lamented deeply, but not to 
be exaggerated into a fall from the spirit of the Gospel, and a dishonor put on his sacred profession. 

F 2 



36 OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 

TephiHah ! The late Charles Grant, Esq. East India Director, immediately stepped forward and restored 
the Church to religion ; he paid for it the sum it was appraised at, ten thousand Rupees ! Yes. One person 
stepped forward and saved the temple, where the hymns of truth had been chaunted for seventeen 
years ! The property of the Church, School and Burying Ground, was transferred on the last day of 
October 1787, to three trustees : the Rev. Mr. Brown, Mr. William Chambers, and the purchaaer, 
Mr. Charles Grant. Thenceforward it ceased to be the property of an individual. Since the transfer 
of their Church, the Society have not been fortunate in their selection of Missionaries, and the duty 
for upwards of 20 years devolved chiefly on the Rev. Mr. Brown, who, with such other chaplains as 
have been attached to the Presidency, have rendered their voluntary services to the Miasion. 
Mr. Kiemander was now resolved to quit Calcutta and offer his services to the Dutch at Chinsnrah, 
where he was appointed. Chaplain; before his departure he went to the Burying Ground, and there 
wept and bewailed between the graves of his two wives. 

Amidst all the wreck of earthly things, the hope of eternal life was blooming in his soul, and ike mmt 
was happy. At Chinsurah he performed service twice on the Sabbath, in a small Lutheran Chordi ; 
the people were intent on commerce, and he found their society any thing but a pleasure. He was 
within a few miles of Serampore, where he foimd a fgir kindred spirits, some of whom acknowledged 
the benefit they had received through the words he had preached in their ears, and it was a pleasure 
to him to hear this ; but even from his latter resting place he was doomed to be again thrust. In 1795, 
war was declared by England against Holland, and the factory of Chinsurah was captured, Kiemander 
was taken prisoner of war ; but, at last, he was permitted to go to Calcutta. How strange and nn- 
searchable are the ways of God ! This was the place appointed for him to end his days ; he was taken 
into the house of a relation of one of his wives, and in the following spring, while rising from his chair, 
he fell and broke his thigh. During his illness, he was occasionally visited by the Rev. David Brown, 
and a few others, who did their duty, in trying to comfort the aged pilgrim. His intellect remained 
firm, and in a letter to his native place, Akstad, he blessed the day he had left it, to preach the Gospel, 
and foretold that the whole English nation would unite in one Society to send the Gospel to the "* 
Indies, and that this would give stability to the British power there. 

What counsel could his visitors now offer to this man of nearly a century, compared to the 
which his chequered life had laid up ? Even now his mind was in all its vigour ; it was sad, yet beaa- 
tiful, to sit at his bedside. 

The Rev. John Zachariah Kiemander died in Calcutta at the advanced age of eighty-eight, after a 
residence in India of nearly sixty years. His remains were entombed in the sepulclure c^ his second 
lady, at the Mission Burial Ground, formerly called by his own name. 

The success which attended him throughout his labours, both at Cuddalore and Calcutta, was remark- 
able. For example, from 1776 to 1786, the increase to his Portuguese and native congregation in Gal- 
cutta was 518, and during the period of 28 years he baptized at least 209 adult heathen and received 
into his congregation 300 awakened and converted Roman Catholics. 

His liberdity throughout life was conspicuous. At one time he supported 40 children at his own 
expense ; at another, he fitted up a house for his native congregation, then he built, as before stated, at 
an expense of 60 or 70,000 Rupees, the old Church, which was opened in December 1770; next he 
added school-rooms ; lastly, a Parsonage House was erected. In the meantime the poor ever found in 
him a friend and helper ; and his hospitality to strangers and visitors to Calcutta was the theme of 
every one's commendation. 

He was in poverty, but not in a state of destitution in the close of life ; for the property settled on 
his daughter-in-law was of course saved from the general wreck, and this afforded him means of snp- 
port and comfort. He died in 1799. 



THE REVEREND HENRY MARTYN. 

Martyn, the subject of this memoir, was bom at Truro, in the county of Cornwall, on the 
18th of February 1781. He was the third son of Mr. John Martyn, who was originally a labourer in 
the Mines near Gwanaf, the place of his nativity, with no education but such as a country reading^ 
school offered ; during the periods of relaxation from manual labour he so intensely devoted Ids atten- 
tion that, in time, he acquired a complete knowledge of Arithmetic, and some acquaintance also with 
Mathematics ; and no sooner had he gathered these valuable and substantial fruits of persevering deli- 
gence in a soil most unfriendly to their growth, than he was raised from a state of poverty and depres- 
sion to one of com))arative ease and comfort. Admitted into the office of Mr. Daniel, a merchant in 
Truro, he lived there as Chief Clerk, piously and respectably, enjoying considerably more than a compe- 
tency. Henry, being 7 and 8 years of age, was placed by his father, about mid-summer 1788, at a 
Grammar School in the town, the master of which was the Reverend Cornelius Cardew, D.D. Of his 
childhood, previous to this period, little or nothing can be ascertained ; but those who knew him, con- 
sidered him a boy of promising abilities. Upon his first entering the school. Dr. Cardew observes, 
** he did not fail to answer the expectations that had been formed of him ; his proficiency in the classes 
exceeded that of most of his school-fellows, yet there were boys who made a more rapid progress — not 
perhaps that their abilities were superior, but their application was greater ; for he appeared to be the 
idlest among them, but of a lively cheerful temper, and was frequently known to go up to his lesson 
with little or no preparation, as if he had learned it merely by intuition. Henry remained here till he 
was between 14 and 15 years of age, at which period he was induced to offer himself as candidate for a 
vacant scholarship at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Young as he was, he went there without any 
interest in the University, and with only a single letter to one of the Tutors ; and there he acquitted 
himself so well, (though strongly and ably opposed) that in the opinion of some of the examiners, he 
ought to have been elected. How often is the hand of God seen in frustrating our fondest designs. 
Had success attended him, the whole circumstances of his after life would have been varied ; and 



OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. Z7 

howerer his temporal interests might have been promoted, liis spiritual interests would proUably have 
sustained a proportionate loss. 

After this repulse, Hairy returned home, and continued to attend Dr. Cardew's School till June 
1797. In the spring of this year he directed his Tiews towards the University of Cambridge, his 
residence being at St. John's College, where his name had been previously entert^ in the month of 
October 1797. Here his time was so well employed that at the second public examination in the 
summer, he reached the second station in the first class, a point of elevation which flattered his pride 
not a little. Hie tenor of Henry Martyn's life, during this and the succeeding year which he passed 
at College, was to the eye of all who knew, amiable and commendable* in the highest degree. He 
was outwardly moral, and by unwearied application, exhibited marks of no ordinary conduct ; but he 
seemed to have been totally ignorant of spiritual things, and to have lived without God in the world. 
However it pleased God to convince him by a most affecting visitation of his Providence, that there was 
a knowledge far more important to him than any human science. The sudden and heart rending inteUi- 
gence of the death of his father was the proximating cause. It was not long after Henry had heesk 
called to endure this gracious, though grievous, chastening from above, that the public exercises com- 
menced in the University. From this time to that of proposing himself for admission to a Fellowship in 
his CoUege, Mr. Martyn's engagements consisted chiefly in instructing some pupils and preparing him- 
self for the examination, which was to take place previous to the election in the month of March 1802, 
when he was chosen fellow of St. John's, soon after which he was admitted a Bachelor of Arts. Having 
thus added another honor to those for which he was distinguished, Mr. Martyn departed from Cam- 
bridge on a visit to his relations in Cornwall. 

In the beginning of October 1802, all those tranquil and domestic joys were exchanged for the 
severe engagements of the University, and the conclusion of this year constituted a memorable era in 
Martyn's life. We have already seen him become the servant of Christ, dedicating himself to the 
ministry of the Gospel, and we now behold him in a higher character, that of a Christian Missionary. 
The immediate cause of his determination to undertake this office was a remark on the benefit which 
had resulted from the services of Dr. Carey amongst the heathen of British India ; accordingly, when 
he left England, he left it wholly for Christ's sake, and he left it forever. 

On the 7th of January, the East Indiaman which was to convey Mr. Martyn to Calcutta, sailed from 
Portsmouth and arrived at Calcutta on the 14th of May 1806. Mr. M. was received by the Rev. 
Darid Brown, at his residence at Aldeen, near Calcutta. Here he applied himself most ardently to the 
acquisition of Hindostanee, availing himself of the assistance of a Cashmerian Brahmin, whom he wearied 
widi his unbending assiduity. He was also constant in preaching the Gospel to his countrymen, both 
in the Mission Church and the new Church in Calcutta. 

On the 13th September Mr. Martyn received his appointment to Dinapore, where he arrived on the 
26th November. Here he commenced his ministry and continued until 1809, when he received the 
intelligence of his mother's death. He removed from Dinapore to Cawnpore ; here also he received the 
news of the demise of his sister, who had been so instrumental in his conversion to the Lord. 

During Mr. Mart3rn's residence at Cawnpore he continued to minister assiduously in the early part 
of the year 1810, to the temporal and spiritual wants of the poor, who statedly assembled before. his 
house ; nor did he cease to do so whilst his health permitted. 

In the midst of these exertions, a painful attack in the chest of a severer kind than he had ever before 
experienced, forced upon Mr. Martyn's mind the unwelcome conviction of the necessity of some quiet- 
ness and remission from labor. Such was the sinking state of his health, notwithstanding the seasonable 
and important assistance derived ft*om- the presence of Corrie, that a removal from Cawnpore, either to 
make a trial of the effect of a sea voyage, or a return, for a short time, to England, became a matter of 
urgent necessity. The adoption of the latter expedient he had once determined upon, but again con- 
ceiving that a bracing air would be beneficial, Mr. Martyn departed from Cawnpore on the 1st Octo- 
ber, for Mr. Brown's residence at Aldeen, which he safely reached on the evening of the last day of 
the month, restored after an absence of 4 years to an intercourse with his friends, (who on beholding 
his pallid countenance and enfeebled frame, knew not whether to mourn most or to rejoice.) Though 
still exceedingly infirm, he yet, with one exception, preached every sabbath at Calcutta, until he finally 
left it. 

On the 7th January, after having preached a sermon on the Anniversary of the Calcutta Bible So- 
ciety, addressed the inhabitants of Calcutta, from that text of Scripture — " That one thing is needful," 
Mr. Martyn departed forever from those shores where he had fondly and fully purposed to spend all 
his days. 

He took his passage in the skip ** Ahmoody," Capt. Kinsey, bound to Bombay, from which place he 
embarked on the *' Benares," Captain Sealy, for Bushire, where he commenced travelling by land to 
Shiraz. 

On the evening of the 24 th May, one year after entering where his time was spent, preaching and 
arguing with the different sects on the coasts of Persia, Mr. Martyn left Shiraz with the intention to lay 
before the King his translation of the New Testament ; but finding that, without a letter of introduction 
from the British Ambassador, he could not be admitted into the royal presence, he determined to proceed 
to Tehran, where, at that time, Sir Gore Ouseley, his Britannic Majesty's Minister, was residing. While 
on his way thither his fever and ague increased with unremitting severity, but Sir Gore Ouseley, 
together with his lady, paid him the most constant attention. On account of the general state of his 
health, he determined to return to England by land, and accordingly he set his face towards it. His 
journey was the most painful. The miseries he endured were intense, and it ended in his entrance into 
heaven. 

On the 2nd September, Mr. Martyn set out on his long journey of one thousand three hundred 
miles, and on the 5th October reached Tocat, at a moment when the inhabitants of that place were 
flying from the town because of the plague which was raging there. On the following day, '* no horses 



38 OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 

being procurable/' be says in his journal, *' I had an unexpected repose ; I sat in the ordbard, and thought, 
with sweet comfort and peace, of my God, in solitude; my company, my friends, my oomforten. O! 
when shall time give place to eternity ; when shall appear the new heaven and new earth where dweUech 
righteousness ; there shall in nowise enter in any thing that defileth ; none of that wretcbyedness tint 
has made man worse than the beastt of the field ; none of those corruptions that add still more to the 
miftsion of mortality shall be seen or heard any more/' Scarcely had Mr. Martyn breathed these as> 
pirations after that state of blissful purity, for which he had attained such a measure of meekness, 
than he was called to exchange a condition, of pain, weakness and suffering, for that everlasting ** rest 
which remained! for the people of God." At Tocat, on the IGth of Octolier 1812, either falling a 
sacrifice to the plague, which then raged there, or sinking under that disorder which when he penned 
his last words, had so greatly reduced him, he surrendered his soul into the hands of hia Redeemo'. 

So richly was the mind of Mr. Martyn endowed by the God of nature and of grace, that at no 
period could his death be a subject of common lamentation to those who valued the interest of the 
church of Christ. " He was in all hearts," observed one of his friends in India. *' We honoared him, 
we loved him, we thanked God for him, we prayed for his continuance among us ; rejoiced in the good 
he, was doing ; we are sadly bereaved ; where such fervent piety and extensive knowledge, and vigoroof 
understanding and classical taste and unwearied application were all united, what might not hare ben 
expected ; we cannot dwell upon the subjeol without feeling very sad. I land upon the walls of 
Jerusalem, and see the lamentable breach tliat has been made in them, but it is the Lord ; He gave and 
he hath taken away." 

** Mr. Martyn," remarked another of his friends, in describing more particularly his inteUectnsl 
endowments, " combined in himself certain valuable but distinct qualities seldom found together in the 
same individual. The easy triumphs of a rapid genius over first difficulties never left him satisfied witk 
present attainments ; his mind, which naturally ranged on a wide field of human knowledge, lost nothing 
of depth in its expaniiiveness. He was one of those few persons, whose reasoning faculty does noc 
suffer from their imagination, nor their imagination from their reasoning faculty ; both, in him, were 
fully exercised, and of a very high order. His mathematical acquisitions clearly left him vrithout a rivsl 
of his own age ; and yet to have known only the. employments of his more free and unfettered moments, 
would have led to the conclusion that the classics and poetry were his predominant passion. But these 
talents, excellent as they were, are lost in the brightness of those christian graces, by which he shone 
as a light in the world, holding forth the word of life. In his faith, there was a singular, a child-like 
simplicity ; great was its energy, both in obeying Christ, and suffering for his name's sake. By this he 
could behold blossoms upon the rod when it was apparently dead, and, in those events which, like the 
captain of the Lord's host seen by Joshua, presented at first a hostile aspect, he could discern a 
favourable and friendly countenance. 

Having listened to Uiat tender and overwhelming introduction of his Saviour, *' lovest thou me ?*' his 
love was fer\'ently exercised towards God and man at all times and in all places ; for it was not like the 
landspring which runs violently for a season and then ceases ; it resembled the fountain which flows 
with a perennial stream from the recesses of the rock. His fear of God and tenderness of conscience, 
and his watchfulness over his own heart could scarcely be surpassed in this state of sinful infirmity ; hut 
it was his humility that was most remarkable : it might be considered as the warp of which the enldit 
texture of his pie^ was composed ; and with this his other christian graces were so intimately blended 
as to beautify and adorn his whole demeanour. It was, in truth, the accordance and consent of Tarious 
christian attainments in Mr. Martyn which were so striking. The symetry of his stature in Christ was as 
surprizing as its heighth. That communion which he held with his God, and which caused his face to 
shine, wa.M ever tempered, like the Patriarchs of old, with the most awful reverence. The nearer the access 
with which he was favored, the more deeply did he feel tliat he was but sinful dust and ashes. No 
discordance could be discovered between peace and penitence ; no opposition between joy and Ciod and 
utter abasement before him, and truly in this, as in every other respect, he had thoroughly imbibed the 
spirit of his own church, which, in the midst of one of her sublimest Hymns of praise, would have her 
members prostrate themselves before their Redeemer, in these words of humiliation, ** Thou that takest 
away the sins of the World, have mercy upon us." To be zealous without love, or to have that which 
is miscalled ** charity, without decision of character," is neither difficult or uncommon. 

Mr. Martyu's zeal was tempered with love, and his love invigorated by zeal ; he combined also, ardoar 
with prudence, gravity with cheerfulness, abstraction from the world with an enjoyment of its lawful 
gratifications. His extreme tenderness of conscience, was devoid of scrupulosity. His activity in g^ood 
works was joined to habits of serious contemplaticm. His religious affections, which were highly spin- 
tualized, exceeded not the limit of the most cautious sobriety, and were so far from impairing his natural 
affections, that they raised and purified them. Many sincere servants of Christ labour to attain heaven, 
but possess not any joyful hope of reaching it. Mr. Martyn could say, we are always confident where- 
fore we labour together with an assurance of Hi.s final and everlasting felicity. He had a dread of declen- 
sion and a fear of losing things he had wrought. He knew that the way to Heaven was narrow from 
the entrance to the end of it ; but he was persuaded that Christ was with him, walking in that way ; 
and that He would never leave him nor forsake him. 

" A more perfect character," says one who bore the burthen and heat of the day with him in India, 
*' I never met with, nor expect to see again on earth. During the four years we were feUow-labourera in 
this country, I had no less than six opportunities of enjoying his company, and every opportunity only 
increased my love and veneration for him." 

With respect to his labors, his own works praise him in the gates, far above human commendation. 
By his means, part of the Liturgy of the Church of England, the Parables and the whole of the New 
Testament, were translated into Hindostanee, a language spoken from Delhi to Cape Comorin, and 
intelligible to many millions of immortal «ouls. By him and by his means also the Psalms of David 
and tlie New Testament were rendered into Persian, the vernacular language of two hundred thousand 



OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 39 

who bear the Christian name, and became known over one-fourth of the habitable globe. By him, also, 
the imposture of the prophet of Mecca was daringly exposed and the truths of Christianity openly 
vindicated, in the very heart and centre of a Mahometan empire I 

God however has not left Mr. Martyn without witness in the hearts of those who heard him in 
Europe and in Asia. Above forty adults and twenty children from the Hindoos, have received christian 
baptism, all of whom, with the exception of a single individual, were converted by the instrumentality 
of one man, himself the fruit of Mr. Martyn's ministry at Cawnpore. 

At Shiraz a sensation has been excited which it is trusted will not readily subside, and some Mahome- 
tans of consequence there have declared their conviction of the truth of Christianity, a conviction 
which Mr. Martyn was the means of imparting to their minds. But when it is considered that the 
extension of the Scriptures in Hindostanee, are in wide circulation, who can ascertain the consequences 
which may have already followed, or foresee what may hereafter acme ? So long as England shall be 
celebrated for that pure and apostolical Church of which Martyn was so great an ornament ; so long 
as India shall prize that which is more precious to her than all her gems and gold, the name of the 
subject of this memoir will not wholly be forgotten, and there will not be wanting those who will think 
of the humble and unfrequented grave of Henry Martyn, and be led to imitate those works of mercy 
which have followed him into the world of light and love. 

The following simple tablet to the memory of Mr. Martyn is erected near the communion of the 
Mission Church of Calcutta. 

To the memory of 
The Rev. Henry Martjn, 

Chaplain of the Bengal Estabiuthment. 
" He was a burning and a shininfr light." 
He died at Tocat in Armenia, 16th October 1812, aged only 32 ! 



THE REVEREND DAVID BROWN. 

The subject of this memoir was bom in the East Riding of Yorkshire, and had, from early youth, im- 
bibed a serious and religious turn of mind, and was distinguished, among his connexions, for his amiable 
disposition and thirst for general and literary information. 

While on a journey, at about the 1 0th or 11 th year of his age, he fell into the company of a minister 
whose attention was strongly attracted by his intelligent enquiries and remarks. Although a stranger, 
he could not refrain from informing himself what line of life was designed for the interesting youth. His 
parents answered, that as he evinced no great disposition to be employed on his father's farm, they 
should probably bind him apprentice to some country tradesman, perhaps a druggist. The stranger 
replied, " I think he is destined to a higher and more important profession ; and if you will entrust him 
with me for a year or two, I will give him the preparatory attention necessary to his passing through 
a grammar school, which may fit him for a College, and lead to his entering the Church." The parents, 
struck with his liberal proposal, were soon induced to acquiesce, and young David resided mider the 
private tuition of his new friend at Scarborough, till he removed to HuUy, to attend the excellent public 
Grammar School, then under the care of the Rev. Joseph Milner. From this Mr. Brown proceeded 
to the University of Cambridge, and was entered at Magdalene College. Though much interrupted 
from severe illness, he prosecuted the usual studies, preparatory to entering the Church, but from which 
he was most unexpectedly called off by a remarkable and unforeseen offer made to him of going to 
India. 

Immediately on his arrival at Calcutta, in 1786, he found himself in a most responsible situation at 
the head of an extensive Orphan establishment, which demanded and received all his zeal, perseverence 
and affection. Within a few days of his arrival he was nominated Chaplain to a Brigade in Fort William ; 
the following year he superadded to these duties the charge which he voluntarily undertook with the 
approbation of his brother chaplains, of the Mission Church. Thus did he work in the fuU tide of his 
strength, officiating at each of diese distant points in succession, on every Sunday. 

On his appointment in 1794 to the Chaplaincy of the Presidency, his work became still more increased. 
He continued in charge of the Garrison and to officiate on Sundays, twice at the Mission, once at the 
garrison, and once at the Presidency Church, besides establishing a weekly lecture. 

During Mr. Brpwn's ministry a remarkable change took place at that Church to which he was 
appointed. The attendance on Divine service there so greatly increased, that the Church-yard and 
even streets adjoining were regularly thronged with the palanquins and equipages of the congregation ; 
not because he was a popular preacher, or that his subjects or delivery were considered attractive ; but 
because his consistent walk and conscientious earnestness finally prevailed, and he at length found that 
a Church had been built up of living stones, that a Godly people and loving holiness had arisen even 
in India. Whatever moraJ or political changes Asia may have undergone in the course of his period, 
his warning and encouraging voice was unintemiptedly heard in the Churches of Calcutta for 25 years. 
Thus were his faithful efforts crowned. It may be said of Mr. Brown, most literally, that he '* grew 
in grace and in the fear of the Lord." He was exceedingly generous, and, at all times, hospitable. 
To comprise, in one view, his generous, varied efforts to do good, it ought to be recorded how unbounded 
wa9 his libendity in expending largely on the Mission School buildmg. In 1787, it was a clumsy 
unplastered brick edifice of small dimensions, choked up with old houses ; and from being of a reddish 
colour, had the appellation given to it by the natives of the ** Lall Greja," under which name it oonti- 
nues to be best known among them even at the present day. Within, it was exceedingly uncouth, with a 
brick pulpit built against a wall. Encouraged and assisted by the fine taste and scientific abilities of 
his respected friend Mr. W. Chamber, Mr. Brown was not long in improving and enlarging it. His 
Missionary zeal was very great ; he laboured himself and aided Ministers and Missionaries both of the 
Church of England and other denominations. He extended generous aid, to a large amount, to the 



40 OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 

Missionaries of Serampore, for forwarding their general purposes ; as also more prirate asustanoe to 
individuals among them. From the pulpit he made two remarkably successful exertionfl ; <me to 
establish a fund for the relief of all indigent objects, whether Europeans or natives, and one for dw 
benefit of the Tamul Christians. This first effort made from the pulpit of the Established Churdi in 
India, on the subject of raising aid for native Christians, to supply them with the Scriptures in Hmoc 
own tongue, was followed up, the next year, by the lamented Henry Martyn ; and gave rise to dw 
formation of the Auxiliary Bible Society, which was suggested and organized by Mr. Brown, and to 
which (as before to the original Bible Committee at Calcutta) he accepted the office of gratuitous Secre- 
tary. Another favourite pursuit which Mr. Brown had the happiness to see brought to bear by his 
exertions and become eminently useful, was a fund in aid of pious serious Ministers, to preach to the 
congregation of the Mission Church, since the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge HfmstH 
from supplying it. 

In 1812 he became dangerously ill ; and truly there is no conveying an adequate idea of all he imder- 
went in body and attempted in mind, during the long period of his sickn^s. At length he consentBd 
to go out to sea, as the indispensible and sole remaining remedy for the recovery of his health. It is 
less necessary to enter minutely on the distressing circumstances here. Suffice it to saj, that the 
Indiaman in which he embarked for Madras struck on a sand in her passage down the bay. Thus the 
trial of a voyage and the favorable effects ^ the little sea air he did enjoy, were frustrated. He was 
brought back to Calcutta under most disadvantageous circumstances ; even to sleeping, exposed to 
the unsalutary night air on the open deck of the crowded schooner which conveyed him and the other 
passengers from the grounded vessel. This, together with the want of proper sustenance and comforti 
necessary to his reduced state, greatly increased hLs weakness. In a word, it pleased God that he 
should be brought back to the bosom of his family, and be surrounded by the objects of his tenderot 
love, when his spirit was called hence. He was not again conveyed to his own abode, but was reodved 
under the hospitable roof of Mr. and Mrs. Harington at Chowringhee, with a view to his receiving the 
first medical attention under these disastrous occurrences. His holy habit of unreserved submiasiQS 
to the will of God, as marked by his providence, shone forth. He never uttered a repining sound 
that his reluctant and painful effort had been made in vain, but sincerely thought and declared, tint 
sU was well : even as much so as if the plan had succeeded, according to the wishes and the expedi^ 
tions of his anxious friends for tlie restoration of his health and usefulness. His last morning wai 
particularly calm, collected, and resigned ; and his last breath spoke thankfulness for the merdfal 
consolations showered down upon him. While in the act of thus expressing his humble gratitade to 
God and man, he closed his eyes, and raised his feeble liands, and still moved his lips in inward wor- 
ship, but his voice was heard no more. 

His remains were interred in the old (south) Park Street Burying Ground, close to the gateway. T1» 
inscription over his tomb will be read in the usual place, and the following lines inscribed on a Ua^ 
Marble Tablet, will be seen in the old Church walls, the chief scene of his labours. 

To the poor the Gospel was prearhed in this Church 
by the Reverend DaTid Brown, 
Tweuty-five years. 
Obt. ap Calcutta 14 June 1B12, set. 49. 

(The following lines are inscribed on a black Marble Tablet : — J 



In Memory of Charles Grant. Esq. 

late a Director of the Hun'ble E. 1. Company, 

and formerly a Civil Servant oi this Presidency ; who was distinfruished by his unwearied seal 

in promuting the cause of Religion in India, of which this Church, purchased at his 

expense, and preserved for the service of God, is a prootand monumenU 

He died m London October 31st A. D. 1823, Aged 78 Years. 



THE REVEREND THOMAS THOMASON. 

The Rev. Thomas Thomaaon was bom at Plymouth on the 7th of June 1774, and nntU tiie 5th 
year of his age lived under the care of a mother, who within a year after his birth, became a widov. 
His father having died in the West Indies, his mother was doomed to shed the bitter tear of «i ^ tr ^Mw snd 
desolation over the head of a fatherless child, whom it was her sole and anxious concern to none snd 
educate. Circumstances affecting as tliese, rarely fail to heighten the reciprocations of fondness between 
parents and children : nor was this observation ever more fully verified dian in the present imyfa^y^y 

Having left Devonshire for London, four years after her bereavement, Mrs. Thomason placed her lOO 
in a school at Greenwich, under the superintendence of Mr. Bake^Yell. There, to adopt her own woidt, 
*' The affectionate care of one of the tutors over the spiritual instruction of one who was mj world of 
happiness, was beyond all praise." For some time, nothing appeared in this boy beyond sweetDSB 
of temper, quickness of apprehension, docility and diligence. In his ninth year a marked bleesiu 
descended on his tutor's unremitting exertions, and he began to shew so much spirituality of feehnc, 
and such decision of character, as to constitute this a distinct era in his life. Frequent questions oa 
the Scriptures and applications of them to mankind and to herself, did show that the seed of rail 
religion did not lie merely upon the surface of his mind, but had become radicated in his affections. 

At the age of thirteen he was engaged as a tutor at Deptford. In this employment he continued 
till midsummer of 1789 ; when, being a proficient in the French tongue, and Dr. Coke wanting an inter- 
preter in that language, he was persuaded to accompany the Doctor, in that capacity, to the West 
Indies. Soon after his return from the West, he became known to a lady of the name of Thornton. 
Her affection for him was almost maternal. At Elland in Yorkshire, a Society existed, (it still lives 
and is vigorous in well doing ;) the sole object of which was, the highly important one of 



OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 41 

a fostering wing orer thoie aspirants to the ministry of the Church of England whose means were not 
sufficient to enable them to take the necessary degree at the University. By the advice of Mr. Thorn- 
ton, application was now made to this Institution. The late Rev. Henry Foster and the Rev. Richard 
Cecil were deputed by the Directors of the EUand fund, to examine the pretensions of the young man 
who now presented himself before them ; the period of suspense between the report of the examiners, 
and the determination of the Society for some unexplained cause, lasted long. It was not till the 
spring of 1791, that, after an interview with one of the Directors of the EUand Institution, his final ac- 
ceptance was signified. ** I am. accepted,'' he writes to his mother March 18, 1791 ; '* no doubt your 
heart overflows virith gratitude ; I am sure, mine does ; Mr. Atkins is quite a father to me ; the kindnesa 
I have experienced in Leeds far eclipses all other favors : Blei^s the Lord, O my soul, and all that is 
within me, bless His Holy name." A clergyman of the name of Clark, of Chcshara in Buckingham- 
shire, at the recommendation of the EUand Society, who were to pay simply for his board, agreed to 
instruct him without any remuneration. For this task he was well qualified. At the moment of his 
departure from Chesham for Cambridge, joy at the prospect then opening before him, was absorbed in 
grief at quitting the abode of his incomparable tutor. *' Curnec facilitas auctoritatem nee gravit as 
amorem diminuit." At the close of the year 1798, Mr. Tbomason was ordained a Presbyter in the 
Church of England by Dr. Comwallis, Bishop of Lichfield. 

In 1808, Mr. Tbomason was appointed as a Chaplain at Calcutta, and left Portsmouth June 10, 
and arrived at Calcutta on the 19th November, after experiencing a narrow escape from the shipwreck 
of the vessel in which he had taken his passage. The second Sunday after landing at Calcutta, Mr. 
Tbomason commenced his ministry at the Old Church, from the text, *^ Knowing the terrors of the 
Lord, we persuade men." 

So favourably had Mr. Tbomason 's labours been received, that before the lapse of six months, it was 
expedient to enlarge his church. For the greater part of two years Mr. Tbomason was almost as 
strong to labour in India as in England ; but the second hot season made a sensible impression on his 
health, when he began to droop so much, that he was compelled to suspend his ministerial duties for 
six weeks, and betake himself to a pinnace for a trip on the river. While Mr. Tbomason was seeking 
restoration of strength from the breezes on the Hooghly, he had heard that Mr. H. Martyn arrived at 
Calcutta very iU, and was going to sea for his health ; this news brought Mr. Thoniason back. The 
years 1812 and 1813 were, to Mr. Tbomason, years of mourning beyond experience or expression; 
sorrow upon sorrow roUed on him — (the deaths of Mr. Brown and Mr. Martyn). From the period of 
Mr. Brown's death to the close of the succeeding year, when Mr. Tbomason obtained, after countless 
difficulties, an assistant in his Church, his labours were unusually great. Besides pastoral concerns, 
he was engaged in revising the Arabic version of the Scriptures and Martyn 's Hindoostani New Testa- 
ment. He executed also, at the desire of the Government, the duties of Examiner in Arabic in the 
College of Fort WiUiam ; and as if this were not enough, was preparing further work for himself, by 
inviting the Church Missionary Society to place two Missionaries under his instruction (gratuitously) 
in Oriental Uterature. But the project, which of all others lay nearest his heart, was tbe establishment 
of native schools, and as a preparatory step, a school for School-masters. 

At this time, in the middle of October 1813, the Earl of Moira arrived at Fort William, and after a 
short period, began to attend the Mission Church, notwithstanding its unfashionable character, and 
appointed its ministers to perform stated service at fiarrackpore ; he fixed upon him also to accompany 
him as Chaplain in a journey of state through the provinces ; and as a yet further proof of the manner 
in which he appreciated his talents and judgment, commissioned him in the early part of 1814, to draw 
up and submit to the Government a plan for the education of the Indian population. He granted 
permission likewise to Mr. Tbomason to have the labours of his assistant made permanent, a measure 
which he more highly prized, than any personal favour in the power of the Governor General to grant. 

The expedition of the Governor General through British India commenced, and Mr. Tbomason 
accompanied him ; but it was not long after entering upon the second part of this expedition that Mr. 
Thomason's zeal, fideUty and boldness, as well as his wisdom and discretion, were signally put to the 
proof. He soon discovered, to his sorrow, that the Governor General, when travelling, paid no regard 
to the Christian sabbath, As his Chaplain, therefore, he deemed it incumbent on him to notice thia 
violation of the day of rest ; perceiving however, when he had hoped his suggestions had been attended to, 
and his object attained, that arrangements were making on the Saturday for moving the next day, hii 
conacience told him that he should be wanting in aUegiance to the Lord of the sabbath, if yielding to 
natural inclinations, he offered no remonstrance. Painful as the measure was, he hesitated not to adopt 
it. The reply was his dismissal from the Camp. The rigour of this stern and haughty mandate was 
indeed tempered by an intimation from the Secretary that an apology would be accepted. To apologize 
when in error was congenial to Mr. Thomason's conciliating disposition ; but in this case, apology was 
cmt of the question — yet, as explanation was both admissable and becoming, he instantly wrote to the 
Governor General, expressing his surprize at this order, but his readiness at the same time to comply 
with it, adding, that he felt as strongly as ever, the importance of the subject, and thought it the duty 
of a minister of religion to remonstrate where its interests were concerned ; but he lamented that any 
thing should have appeared in the expression of his sentiments that was thought disrespectful. The 
Governor General was satisfied, and, for a time, respect was paid to the sabbath day. 

Mr. Thomason's return to his flock in 1815 was an event of mutual joy to himself and them. 

In January 1824 he was fixed in the Cathedral. The autumn of this year was remarkable for an 
epidemic of a singular character : it raged in Calcutta, and Mr. Tbomason was one of those who suffered 
from its violence. 

In the year 1825, he determined, on account of Mrs. Thomason's health, which was declining, and 
in hopes of her restoration, to return to England ; accordingly in the month of October his passage 
was engaged. Like many events that occur in life, varied by the strongest light and shades, on his 
Arrival in England to his great joy he found a mother ; but to his indescribable anguish, he had lost a 

o 



42 OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 

wife, who breathed her Ust on the 24th of March, 1826. In June 1828, he left England, mnd in little 
more than 4 months, re-entered the scene of his Indian labours. But it was suftering and death, 
not life and action, that the Lord, whose ways are not as men's ways, appointed. Almoet errr ainoe kb 
arrival, he had been under medical treatment, and therefore it proved absolutely neceHsry that he 
should seek restoration by change of climate. A ship being about to sail for the Maaritiofl, prqpwmtioas 
were made, without loss of time, and he took his passage down the river. The voyage to ^e ManuitiiiB 
proved beneficial, but when the anchor was dropped at Port Louis, June 7th, which proved to be hialnrtb- 
day, alarms and fears greatly exceeded favourable expectations, and on Sunday, June 22d, twdl^e dvfs 
after landing in the Isle of France, his earthly tabernacle was dissolved, and his spirit niimberri 
amongst the just made perfect. Thus fell a great man in Israel. For sweetness of temper and nmplici^ 
of spirit, he was distinguished ; there was not a shadow of guile or of artifice in him ; hilarity and 
cordiality of feeling one generally found ; in tliis combination they were so in him. Apathy did not cUM 
his affections nor did gloom ever settle upon his mind ; generosity was the very fonshine of hit 
He fed those committed to his charge with that bread of life, which was the daily 
refreshment of his own soul. 



(The following is the Inscription placed to his Memory in the Old Ckurck :J 

To the Mon»ory of 

The Rev. T. T. Thomason, M.A, 

Thi9 tablet was erected by a grateful and affectionate people, 

in remembrance of his long and faithful Ministry. 

He died at the Mauritius 22d June 1829, aged 55 years. 



{The following Inscription is to be seen on the North of the Communion Table : — ) 

To the Memory of 

The Rev. R. B. Boyes, A.B. Chaplain. 

who after faithfully laboring for ten years in 

the LfOrd's Service, in thi» Church, fell asleep in Jesu*, 

on the 10th of December 1841, in the .38th year of his age. 

" Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace."— Ps. xzzvii. 37. 



THE REV. R. B. BOYES, A. B,^(HU Christian character and peac^ end.J 

In reference to the former, his character, you will see the perfect and upright man as described, 
whether you regard him in his private Christian character or as a minister of the sanctuary. 

As a private Christian there was all that constituted the character whose end is peace ; he k*d al 
those elements which compose the perfect and devout man, although it was not until he had attained to 
man's estate that his mind was enlightened to see the necessity of that great change which conatitntes 
this character, and which the Scriptures represent under the idea of *' a new birth," ** m resurrectioa 
from death to life," yet when that light was vouchsafed it was the Holy Spirit's own work, and it wis 
complete and entire. His faith in Christ was exclusive of all other ground of trust. His simple •Sw^ was 
that '* he might be found in Christ ;" this was all his salvation and all his desire ; his love to the Saviour 
was manifest to all, both in his word and actions ; his zeal for the glory of Christ, and the promotiott of 
his cause in the world were the objects of his constant prayers and efforts, and his obedience wai 
evident by his holy life, and conversation before all men. He was a truly good man, and has left aa 
example both in his principles and practice worthy of attention. His spirit, his life, his conduct, were 
those of an upright Christian ; he was remarkable for a spirit of kindness, meekness, gentleness, and 
amiability ; they were exemplified in the whole deportment. His religion thus present^ more of the 
attractive and lovely, and if he did not manifest so much as others the ardent, and enterpriring spirit, 
he showed more of ihe mind which is clothed with humility. If he had not the untiring seed which 
overcomes all obstacles, he had the spirit of love, and was decked with the ornament of a meek and 
quiet spirit. He copied the gentleness of St. John rather than the valour of St. Paul. 

He was in a word, a man of God, a living epistle of the truth, known and read of all men ; he adorned 
the doctrines of God his Saviour in all things, and he has left behind a reputation not only that ii 
blameless, but that is praiseworthy and of good report, but it is to be remembered that it was thi 
exemplification of Christian faith. 

His character as a minister of the sanctuary will be found the same upright and consdentioiis indi- 
vidual, anxious only to fulfil his ministry so as to be the means of *' saving himself and those who heard 
him." 

The doctrines which he taught were strictly spiritual ; he drew all his instructions from God's blessed 
word ; he constantly insisted upon those great and leading truths which that word exhibits, and all ha 
instructions were marked by their evangelical character ; whatever the subject on which he dwelt Christ 
was all. If he preached repentance it was that which was available through Christ ; if he set fordi 
the beauty and excellency of the law, it was to direct men to Chru4t as the only ground of pardon for 
having broken it, or of strength to enable them to fulfil it. His labours in the pulpit were marked by 
fidelity. He adapted his discourses to the diflferent classes of his hearers ; he kept back nothing as far as 
he knew that might be profitable to them who heard him. 

His firm attachment to tlie Church was unmixed with any bigotry ; he loved his Master's imag* 
wherever it was to be traced ; whilst thoroughly persuaded in his own mind of the rectitude of his own 
opinions, he would have trembled to have condemned a fellow Christian who loved the Saviour becaose 
he followed not in the same path with himself. In his preparation for the pulpit he was most diligent 
and laborious, they have been lucid in their arrangement and forcible in their application, they have also 
been attended in their delivery with so much of hallowed and devout feeling, that they conld not hit 



OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 48 

leaye the impression that they had been composed with earnest and fenrent prayer to God, as well aa 
arduous study. 

His sabbath mornings were spent in prayer to God that he would pour out his Holy Spirit upon the 
Ministers and congregations, that should that day assemble for worship throughout the world. He rose 
earlier on that day than usual, for the purpose of securing more time for this sacred work, and effects of 
such devotional spirit have often been evident to the congregation in the subsequent services of the 
sanctuary. But it was in his pastoral visits that he was eminently useful, His flock was the object of his 
care and compassion, many* of whom will remember his affectionate visits; they will not forget how 
desirous he ever was to serve them, to promote their spiritual interests, to sympathize with them in their 
troubles, to console them in their sorrows, to advise them in their difficulties and to aid them by all meana 
in his power. His affection for the young people of his congregation was very great ; the instructions 
which he imparted to them were of the most important nature. How often has he told them that happi- 
ness was only to be found in religion, and now he has sealed the truth of his instructions by his own 
dying testimony. 

Such was the character of this good man and minister ; a faithful labourer in his Master's vineyard. 
He was at his labours almost to the last, and the closing scene of his days was attended with peace and 
even joy ; it was indeed an end that we might justly covet ; it has also left an impression of the triumph 
of Christian principles over death and the ffrave. His end was emphatically peace. The Rev. Mr. 
Boyes for several hours had the impression that the sickness would be unto death, yet he neglected no 
means which might conduce to his recovery. 

To a friend who entered the room and sat by his couch, he said, *' I have nothing to do.'' It is a 
somewhat singular coincidence that the above words are the words uttered on a similar occasion by 
that eminent saint and devoted servant of God, tRe Rev. David Brown ; he said also on his death-bed 
" I have nothing to do now," meaning that his interest in the covenant had been secured before the 
arm of death arrested him. 

The night before his departure several sentences escaped him worthy to be engraven on the rock ; 
he spoke of the precious hours he had spent in the old Church ; of the deeply rooted affection he had 
for this house of God and its sacraments and ordinances. * Yes,' he said, * I have loved and enjoyed them,' 
and added, ' Thine earthly temples Lord I love' but there is a nobler house above,' he referred to the 
beautiful passage ' The eternal God is thy refuge and underneath are the everlasting arms. — Deut. xxxiii. 
27. He said ' that is what Moses experienced, and how can I sink when I am so supported.' When hia 
beloved and now bereaved wife came to him about five o'clock in the morning before his death, he said 
in his most affectionate manner, * I have but one request to ask of my God, that you my dear Mary and 
our dear children, and you my friend and our beloved congregation, may be simply the Saviour's.' 
Almost his last words before ^e body became too weak for the immortal part to act upon ; as the 
medium of its commumcation, were two sentences, one of tender concern for die comfort of his wife on 
her voyage home, and another with regard to the grand foundation on which his faith and hope were 
built : ' what a precious doctrine,' he said, * is the atonement made by our Lord Jesus Christ ; there is no 
other system that can sustain and support a penitent sinner but this can, and does sustain ; I know it 
does.' 

O never was Jordon's streams crossed in a narrower spot ; it was almost forded ; and never was a 
calmer gentler spirit supported across its streams ; it was a scene not only of peace, but of triumph. 
His remains were interred in the Mission Burial Ground and his Inscription will be found amongst 
chose under that head. 



(The folhtoing Inieriptiont are copied from Tablete erected in the Old Church walh ;— -^ 

This tribute of affection is raised by the Christian eommunity of this Presidency, 
to the Memory of the Right Rev. Daniel Corrie, L.L.D. 
late Lord Bishop of Madras, and formerly Archdeacon of Calcutta : 

The friend and fellow-labourer of Henry Martyn. 
The beloved Prelate, died at Madras on the 5th day of February 1837, 
In the 59th year of his age, and the second of his Episcopate. 
" They rest from their labours, and their works do follow them." 



To the Memory of Henry Darenport Shakespear, 

who after thirty-five years of useful and honorable service. 

Died on the t20th day of March 1838, 

A member of the Council of India. 

In token of respect for his public conduct, 

which was conscientious, just, moderate and humane ^ 

of admiration, of the modesty, gentleness, sincerity and piety, 

which adorned his private life; and in grateful remembrance of long and unbroken kindness, this Monu« 

ment is erected by the friends who lament his loss, and cherish the recollection of his virtues. 



This Marble is dedicated bv the Trustees of the Old Church, 
to the Memory of^ Gkorva Udny, Esq. 
late of the Honorable Company^ Bengal Civil Service, 
and many years a member of this congregation ; whose exertions in the causeof religion generally, 

and in the circulation of the Holy Scriptures particularly, 
have well entitled him to this token of grateful remembrance. 
He died in Calcutta, Octobtr 24, A. D. 1830, in the 70fch year of his age. 

o 2 



4i OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 

In Memory of Q, 8. Hnttaaan, Esq. 
who through a long life, bore a consUteat testimony to the truth as it is in Jesus. 
He was born November 10, 1769, Died July 8, 1843. 
" Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age, like as a shock of corn cometh in his season." — Job t. 26. 

This tabltit was raised by the Trustees 
of the Evangelical Fund, connected with this Church, of which Mr. Huttemtn was the oldest member. 



To the Memory of Robert Swinhoe, 

Inte Worshipful Master of Lodge St. John, No. 715, of Calcutta, 

who emieavoured to walk humbly as a Christian, and was as such respected. 

'J his tablet is erected by his sorrowing brethren, 

in token of their affectionate regard in the friend and brother ; 

whom living they loved, and whose loss they deplore. 

.i:tat47. Obiit 17lh of February 1845. 



Sacred to the Memory of Sarab, 
the beloved wife of Joseph Graham, Esq. 50th Regiment N. I. 
who died at sea, on board tlie '* Lady Nugent," 2^ih of November 1829, aged 30 year*. 

In Memory of Mary Slisabeth Murray, 

who died 23d of August 1845, aged 22 years. 
" She is not dead butsleepeth." 



Tn Memory of 
The Rev. "Walter Horenden, B.D. 

late Chaplain and Secretary to tiie Bengal Military Orphan Institution ; 
He died at the Sand heads, on board the " Sea Horse," Pilot Vessel, on the 30th of September 1833 * 

In the 49th year of his a^e. ' 

" And the sea gtive up the dead which were in it."— Rev. xx. 13 v. 



Mr. Horenden was the son of Colonel Hovendcn of Ids Majesty's service. He was bom at WolTer- 
hampton in Staffordshire and (it is believed) educated at a school in that county. His father. Colonel 
Hovenden, was descended from an ancient English family ; the celebrated Historian, Roger De HoTenden, 
who flourished in the reign of Henry the 2nd, was a collateral ancestor. At the early age of 13 Mr. 
Hovenden held an Ensign's commission in bis Majesty's service ; about the age of 15 he joined his 
Regiment then in Holland, and served under the Duke of York till the troops employed in fh^t ex- 
pedition returned to England. After passing through the rank of Lieutenant, he served for about three 
years in the Mediterranean as a Captain of Marines, and subsequently embarked with his R^imoit 
for Madras, where he soon obtained a majority and also the command of his R^^eat, the 38tb foot, 
he being the Senior officer present with the Corps. 

Ill health induced Major Hovenden after his return to Europe to dispose of his Commisnon; hia 
health becoming re-established, and being of an active mind, be went over to Ireland and resided for 
some time, on an estate belonging to the family, where he was put in the Commission of the peace and 
acted as a country Magistrate. 

His mind taking a religious turn, he directed his views towards the Church, returned to England, 
and entered himself at St. Peter's College, Cambridge ; after receiving orders, he officiated as a Curate of 
a parish in the vicinity of Birmingham, till he obtained his appointment from the Court of Directors 
of Chaplain and Secretary to the Lower, or Government Orphan School, and the same appointment to 
the Kidderpore Schools from the Committee of the Military Orphan Society in London. 

Mr. Hovenden's career in India, as a Clergyman and a gentleman, and in his official capacitj, mtirt 
be fresh in the recollection of most Europeans of any stimding in Calcutta. To the higher classes, 
his courteous manners rendered his company highly acceptable ; his kindness and benevolence procured 
him the love and esteem of all who had intercourse with him, 

Mr. Hovenden received his Diploma of Bachelor of Divinity from the Archbishop of Canterburj. 

— . '* Weep no more, 

For Lycidas as your sorrow is not dead, 

Sunk though he be beneath the watery floor ; 

So sinks the day-star in the ocean bed, 

And yet anon repairs his drooping head, 

And trick^i his bearo^, and wiili new spangled ore 

Flames in the forehead of the morning sky. 

So Lycidas sunk low, but mounted high 

Through the dear might of Him that walk'd the waves. 

Where other groves and other streams along, 

With nectar pure his oozy locks he laves 

And hears the unexpressive nuptial song 

In the blessed kingdoms meek of Joy and Love, 

I'here entertain him all the saints above 

In solemn troops and sweet societies, 

That sing, and singing in their glory more 

And wipe the tears for ever from his eyes." Milton. 



THE CRUELTIES OF SURAJ-UD-DOWLAH. 45 

MRS. BROWN. 

This pious and simple-hearted Christian, known to many in India, was taken to her rest in the 67th 
year of her age, on Sunday evening the 24th of April 1842. She had been one of the most regular and 
constant attendiants in tiieOld Church for at least a quarter of a century. Like Dorcas, she was better 
known by the effects of lier faith, '* the good works and alms deeds which she did," than by any 
external professions of it. She shewed her lore to the Gospel, by her affection to its faithful ministers, 
and to all who love our Lord Jestls Christ in sincerity and truth ; by her attachment to God's house 
and ordinances, which she never omitted to attend three times in tlie week, unless prevented by sick- 
ness, — by her unostentatious but widely extended benevolence, — ^by a consistent walk and blameless 
life. She seemed to answer to St. J^aul's description of a widow indeed that trusted in God and 
deserved honor of his Church : — ** One who had been the faithful wife, well-reported of for good 
works, having lodged strangers, having washed the saints' feet, having relieved the afflicted, having 
diligently followed every good work." 

The expression of her hope in Christ and his precious promises, in her last hours, was very diffident 
and humble ; but it was on the right foundation, and that, through the grace of her Saviour, she has 
entered into Paradise. 

In affectionate remembrance of Mrs. Mary Bro^na, widow, 
Wow died April 24th, 1842, aged 76. 
** An Israelite indeed, in whom was no guile." 



In Memory of Charlotte Vanf^haa, 

the beloved wife of the Kev. J. Vaughan, Chaplain. 
N&L 28th May 1823, Ob. September 6, 1842. 



MRS. VAUGHAN. 

This estimable lady expired at sea on her way to Penang, whither she was going for the benefit of 
her health, on the 6th September 1842, and was committed to the deep on the day following. She 
rested on the promises of God ; found peculiar consolation in Matt. xi. 28. She was naturally a most 
gentle being, and grace refined her character. The Lord led her into the wilderness and there spake 
comfortably to her. The last question a Christian friend put to her before she left Calcutta was, 
' Do you feel the Lord gracious ?' She replied with animation, * yes, and more and more so every day.' 
By her loss the Church has been deprived of one of its members in the midst of her days, and an addi- 
tional proof been furnished of the power of Christianity to sustain its possesser while crossing the 
valley of the shadow of Death. 



^^^^^\^^^^^V^^^N^^^^^^k^^^^^^^^^ 



THE CRUELTIES OF SURAJ-UD-DOWLAH. 

CThe late Monument on the North-West angle qf Tank Square ^ which was erected in commemora' 
Hon qfthe horrible event and removed in 1819, had the following Inscription engraven on it .— ^ 

To the Memorys of 

Edward Eyre and William Baillie, E$qs. ; the Eev, Jervat Bellamy ; 

IdesiTS, Jenks, Reerely, Law^ Coates, ^ahcourt, Jebb, Tarriano, E, Fage, 

6. Page, Grub, Street, Harod, P. Johnttoue, IkiUard, N. Drake, Carse, 

Knapton, Gosling, Dod and DalrympU ; Captains CLiyton, Buchanan and 

miherington ; Lieutenants Bishflp, tlays, Blagg, Simpstm and J. Bellamy ; 

Ensigns Paceard, Scott, Hastings, C Wedderbum and Dumbleton\ Sea Captains 

HwU, Osbum and Pumell: Messrs. Carey, Leech, Steavenson, Guy, Porter, 

Parker, Caulker, Bendal,and Atkinson; 

MVho, with sundry other inhabiunts. Military and Militia, to the number of 123 persons, 

were by the tyrannic violence of 

8iiraj-ndFj>owla]i, Suba of Bengal, 

Suffocated in the Black Hole prison of Fort William, on the night of the 20th day of June 1756, 

and promiscuously thrown the succeeding morning into the Ditch of the ravelin of this place. 

This Monument is erected by their surviving fellow-sufferer, 

J. Z. HOLWELL. 

This horid act of violence was as amply as deservedly revenged on Suraj-ud-DowIa, 
by his Majesty's arms, under the conduct ot Vice Admiral Watson and Colonel Cuve, Anno 1757. 



PARTICULARS OF THE ABOVE EVENT. 

** At five the Nabob entered the Fort, accompanied by his General, Meer Jaffier, and most of the 
principal officers of his Army. He immediately ordered Omichund and Kissendass to be brought 
before him, and received them with civility, and having bid some officers to go and take possession of 
the Company's treasury, he proceeded to the principal apartment of the factory, where he sat in state 
and received the compliments of his Court and attendants in magnificent expressions of his prowess and 
good fortune. Soon afteir he sent for Mr. Holwell, to whom he expressed much resentment at the 
presumption of the English in daring to defend the Fort, and much dissatisfaction at the smallness 



46 THE CRUELTIES OF SURAJ-UD-DOWLAH. 

of the sam foand in the Treasury, which did not exceed 50,000 Rupees. Mr. Holwell had two otim' 
conferences with him on this subject before seven o'clock, when the Nobab dismissed him, with repemt^ 
assurances on the word of a soldier that he should suffer no harm. 

** Mr. Holwell, returning to his unfortunate companions, found them assembled, and surroiiiMled bj 
a strong guard. Several buildings on the North and South sides of the Fort were already in flamei, 
which approached with so thick a smoke on either hand, that the prisoners imagined their enemies 
had caused this conflagration in order to suffocate them between the two fires. On each side of tibe 
Eastern gate of the Fort extended a range of chambers adjoining to the curtain, and before the chamben, 
a verandah, or open gallery ; it was of arched masonry and intended to shelter the soldiers from tiie 
sun and rain, but, being low, almost totally obstructed the chambers behind from the light and air, 
and whilst some of the guard were looking in other parts of the fOiCtory for proper places to confine tlie 
prisoners during the night, the rest ordered them to assemble in ranks under the verandah on the right 
hand of the gateway, where they remained for some time with so little suspicion of their impendii^ 
fate, that they laughed among themselves at the seeming oddity of this disposition, and amused them- 
selves with conjecturing what they should next be ordered to do. About eight o'clock those who had 
been sent to examine the rooms reported that they found none fit for the purpose, on which the prin- 
cipal officer commanded the prisoners to go into one of the rooms which stood behind them along 
the verandah. 

It was the common dungeon of the Garrison, who used to call it the Black Hole.* Manj of the 
prisoners knowing the place, began to expostulate, upon which the officer ordered his men to cat down 
those who hesitated, on which the prisoners obeyed. But before all were within, the room was so 
thronged that the last entered with difficulty, the guard immediately closed and locked the door, con- 
fining 146 persons in a room not twenty feet square, with only two small windows, and these obstructed 
by the verandah. 

It was the hottest season of the year and the night uncommonly sultry even at this season ; the 
excessive pressure of their bodies against one another and the intolerable heat which prevailed as sood 
as the door was shut, convinced the prisoners that it was impossible to live through the night in this 
horrible confinement, and violent attempts were immediately made to force the door, but vnthont efiect, 
for it opened inward, on which many began to give a loose to rage. Mr. Holwell, who had placed him- 
self at one of the windows, exhorted them to remain composed both in body and mind, as the only 
means of surviving the night, and his remonstrances produced a short interval of quiet, daring wfaidi 
he applied to an old Jemadar, who bore some marks of humanity in his countenance, promising to 
give him a thousand Rupees in the morning if he would separate the prisoners into two chambers ; the 
old man went to try, but returning in a few minutes, said it was impossible, when Mr. HolwdH 
offered him a larger sum, on which he retired once more and returned with the fatal sentenoe, that no 
relief could be expected, -because '* the Nabob was asleep, and no one dared to wake him." 

*' In the meantime every minute had inreased their sufferings ; the first effect of their confinement 
was a profuse and continued sweat, which soon produced intolerable thirst, succeeded by excmciatuig 
pains in the breast, with difficulty of breathing, little short of suffocation. Various means ^ere tried to 
obtain more room and air. Every one stripped off his clothes, every hat was put in motion, and 
these methods affording no relief it was proposed tliat they should all sit down on their hands at the 
same time, and after remaining a little while in this posture rise all together. This fatal expedient was 
thrice repeated before they had been confined an hour, and every time several unable to rear them- 
selves again fell and were trampled to death by th^ir companious. Attempts were again made to force 
the door, which failing as before, redoubled their rage, but the thirst increasing, nothing bat * water t 
water!' became soon after the general cry. The good Jemadar immediately ordered some skins of 
water to be brought to the windows, but, instead of relief his benevolence became a more dreadfiil 
cause of destruction, for the sight of the water threw every one into such excessive agitations and 
ravings, that unable to resist this violent impulse of nature, none could wait to be regularly served, 
but each with the utmost ferocity battled against those who were likely to get it before him, and in 
these conflicts many were either pressed to death by the efforts of others or suffocated by their own. 
This scene, instead of producing compassion in the guard without, only excited their mirth, and they 
held up lights to the bars in order to have the diabolical satisfaction of viewing the deplorable conten- 
tions of the sufferers within, who finding it impossible to get any water whilst it was thus foiiouBly 
disputed, at length suffered those who were nearest to the windows to convey it in their hats tp those be- 
hind them. It proved no relief either to their thirst or other sufferings, for the fever increased every 
moment with the increasing depravity of the air in the dungeon, which had been so often respired, and 
was saturated with the hot and deleterious effluvia of putrifying bodies ; of which the stendi was little 
less than mortal. Before midnight, all who were alive, and had not partaken of the air at the windows, 
were either in a lethargic stupefaction, or raving with delirium. Every kind of invectiye and abuse 
was uttered by some, in hopes of provoking the guard to put an end to their miseries, by firing into 
^e dungeon ; whilst Heaven was implored by others with wild and incoherent prayers ; ontil the 
weaker, exhausted by these agitations, at length laid down quietly, and expired on the bodies of their 
dead or agonizing friends. Those who still survived in the inward part of the dungeon, finHing ^»% 
the water had afforded them no relief, made efforts to obtain air, by endeavouring to scramble over the 
heads of those who stood between them and the windows, whilst the utmost strength of every one was 
employed for two hours, either in maintaining his own ground, or in endeavouring to get that of whidi 
others were in possession. All regards of compassion and affection were lost, and no one would recedt 
or give way for the relief of another. Faintness sometimes gave short pauses of quiet, but the first 
motion of any one renewed the struggle through all, under which, ever and anon, some one sank te 



* This Cell, commonly known as the Black Hole, was pulled down in 1819 to make room for the New 
Custom House. 



RIGHT HON'BLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND P. R. S. 47 

rUe no more. At two o'clock not more than fifty remained alive, but even this number was too many 
to partake of the saving air, the contest for which, and life, continued until the mom, long implored, 
began to break ; and, with the hope of relief, gave a few survivers a view of the dead. The survivors 
then at the window finding that their entreaties could not prevail on the guard to open the door, it 
occurred to Mr. Cooke, the Secretary of the Council, that Mr. Holwell, if alive, might have more in- 
fluence to obtain their relief, and two of the company undertaking the search, discovered him, having 
still some signs of life ; but when they brought hun towards the window, every one refused to quit his 
place excepting Captain Mills,* who, with rare generosity, offered to resign his, on which the rest 
likewise agreed to make room. He had scarcely begun to recover his senses, before an officer sent by 
the Nabob came and enquired if the English Chief survived ; and soon after, the same man returned 
with an order to open the prison. The dead were so thronged, and the survivors had so little strength 
remaining, that they were employed near half an hour in removing the bodies which lay against the 
door before they could clear a passage to go out one at a time ; when of one himdred and forty-siz 
who went in, no more than twenty-three came out alive. The Nabob's troops beheld them, and the 
hovock of death from which they had escaped, with indifference ; but did not prevent them from 
removing to a distance, and were immediately obliged by the intolerable stench, to clear the dungeon^ 
whilst others dug a ditch on the outside of the Fort, into which all the dead bodies were promiscuously 
thrown. 

** Mr. Holwell unable to stand, was, soon after, carried to the Nabob, who was so far from showing 
any compassion for his condition, or remorse for the death of the other prisoners, that he only talked 
of the Treasure which the English had buried ; and, threatening him with further injuries if he persisted 
in concealing them, ordered him to be kept a prisoner. The officers to whose charge he was delivered 
put him into fetters, together with Messrs. Court and Walcot, who were likewise supposed to know 
something of the Treasure ; the rest of the survivors, among whom were Messrs. Cooke and Mills, 
were told they might go where they pleased ; the dread of remaining any longer within the reach of 
such barbarians, determined most of them to remove immediately, as far as their strength enabled them, 
from the Fort, and most tended towards the vessels, which were still in sight ; but when they reached 
Govindpore, in the southern part of the Company's bounds, they were informed that guards were 
stationcKi to prevent any persons from passing to the vessels ; on which most of them took shelter in 
deserted huts, where some of the natives, who had served the English in different employments, came 
and administered to their immediate wants. Two or three, however, ventured, and got to the vessels 
before sunset. Their appearance, and the dreadful tale they had to tell, were the severest of reproaches 
to those on board, who intent only on their own preservation, had made no efforts to facilitate the 
escape of the rest of the garrison ; never, perhaps, was such an opportunity of performing an heroic 
action so ignominiously neglected ; for a single sloop, with fifteen brave men on board, might, in spite 
of all the efforts of the enemy, have come up, and, anchoring under the Fort, have carried away all 
who suffered in the Dungeon." 

On the first of January 1757, Calcutta was retaken by Admiral Watson,t and Colonel Clive, and on 
the 20th June, Suraj-ud-doulah was defeated at Plassey, and, the beginning of the following month waa 
assassinated by order of the son of his successor, in the 20th year of his age. 

(Fraoment on the above.) 

That cell, erewhile the dungeon of despair. 

And death and horror it was thine to see ; 

How many English captives perished there. 

While the young tyrant slept, and breathed unpoisoued air 

But vengence was not slow ; the haughty Chief 

Shone like a meteor flash, portentous, bright : 

He had his hundred days, sanguine and brief, 

His triumph and his fall. The transient might 

Which clothed his arm soon withered in the fight, 

And Plassey, echoing with the cannon's roar. 

Saw Clive victorious, and the Tyrant's flight. 

Cruehed by avenging power, he rose no more 

But fell by kindred hands, wild, weltering in his gore. 

RIGHT HON'BLE WARREN HASTINGS. L. L. D. AND F. R. S. CLate Governor General qf 
Bengali and a Member^ qf hia Mqjesly's Most Honourable the Privy Council^ 



_ I, the son of an obscure clergyman, and a man destined alike by nature and by 
fortune, to produce no inconsiderable effect on the fate of Asia, as well as of England, was bom in 
1733, A. D. The precise spot where he first saw the light, is unknown to the writer of this article ; 
but it could not have been at Daylesford House, as has been supposed, this mansion having been sold 
full eighteen years before, by one of his progenitors. Certain it is, however, that he passied part of 
his infancy in that neighbourhood, and had imbibed such an attachment to the spot, that he never was 
happy until he had become the possessor. 

llie period that elapsed between his birth and his employment in a public capacity, was so exceed- 
ingly short as to afford but few materials for biography. That his parents were not in great affluence 
may be readily conjectured, when it is recollected, that the remainder of the family estate had been 
recently disposed of ; and yet, on the other hand, his maintenance and education for several years at a 
great public school, followed by a respectable appointment in the service of the East India Company, 
at the moment he was enabled by law to fulfil its duties, would seem to infer no deficiency either of 
substance or connections. 

* Who afterwards died in England in 1811. 

t Who dic<l in Calcutta on the 16tb August 1757, (see page 4.; 



48 RIGHT HON'BLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND P. R. S. 

He came out in the Civil Service in 1749» at the age of eighteen, and immediately- began to study 
the langnages and the politics of the country with great diligence. In 1757, though then only twenty- 
six years of age, he was appointed by Clive Resident at the Durbar at Morshedabad. This was St t£e 
time the most important post, next to that of the Governor himself. When Mr. Vansittart sucoeeded 
to the chair in Calcutta, Mr. Hastings was the only man in whom he put any confidence. In Decem- 
ber 1761, Mr. Hastings came into Council in Calcutta, and alone supported Mr. Vansittart against tha 
opposition of the other Members. He was uncorrupted amidst the general depravity. While his 
colleagues were making large fortunes by pulling down one Nabob and setting up another, he was ne- 
ver suspected of having received any thing. Indeed, when he was going home with his friend Vansit- 
tart in 1765, he was so poor that he was obliged to borrow of strangera a small sum of money which his 
own agent, Khoja Petroos, had refused to lend him. In 1770, he was sent out as second in Councfl 
to Madras, and effected such great reforms as to obtain the highest praise of the Directors. When tha 
Governor's post in Calcutta became vacant, they thought they could not give it to a more worthy in- 
dividual than to Mr. Hastings, and at the age of forty he became Governor of Bengal. He took his 
seat as Governor on the 13th of April 1772, and the very first thing to which his attention was direct- 
ed was the revenues of Bengal. The Directors had been thoroughly disgusted with the management of 
the land revenues by natives. They found their income gradually decreasing ; and they now determi- 
ned, seven years after they had obtained the Dewanny, to ** stand forth as Dewan ;" that is, to take the 
management of the revenues into their own hands, and to make the collections through th&r European 
servants. This new arrangement was carried into effect by Mr. Hastings, who adopted the most 
excellent measures relative to it ; and he at the same time removed the exchequer from Moorshedabsd 
to Calcutta, that it might be under the eye of the Governor. These alterations made it necessary also 
to alter the management of the Civil and Criminal business of the country. Two Courts were ests- 
blished by Mr. Hastings in each district. In the Criminal Court sat the Collector with the Cazee and 
Mooftie ; in the Civil Court sat likewise the Collector, assisted by the Dewan and other officers. 
Two Courts of appeal were at the same time eatablished by him in Calcutta, the Sudder Dewanny, 
for civil, and the Sudder Nizamut Adawlut, for criminal causes. The Choutf or the fourth part of the 
amount of every cause brought into Court, which the Judge had hitherto received, was abolished ; hem' 
vy fines were forbidden ; and the power which a creditor had of confining his debtor at his own will, 
was taken away. All Civil causes under ten Rupees were referred to the head farmer of each Porgnn- 
nah. This was the first attempt made by the English in Bengal, to govern it upon their own plan. 

The Directors attributed the loss of their revenues in Bengal to the evil practices of Mahomed Rhess 
Khan. From the time of his obtaining office, they had regarded him with suspicion. They did not 
forget that, when he held the chukla of Dacca under Meer Jaffer Ali, there was a deficiency of many 
lakhs of Rupees. He was charged by some with having monopolized grain for his own profit, in. the great 
fiBunine of 1770, He was suspected not only of having secreted the public revenue, but of having op- 
pressed the people. While he held his post at Moorshedabad, he was the first man in Bengal ; as Naib 
Subadar, he had the entire management of the revenue ; as Naib Nazim, he had the entire charge of 
the police. The Directors knew, that while he enjoyed such power, no one would come forward to 
accuse him. They sent out orders to Mr. Hastings, that he should be put under arrest, and sent down 
with all his family to Calcutta ; and that all his papers should be seized. Mr. Hastings had taken his 
seat in Council only ten days when these orders reached him late, at night. The following morning, 
he wrote to Mr. Middleton, the Resident at Moorshedabad, to send Mahomed Rheza Khan to Calcutta. 
He was accordingly brought down to Calcutta to take his trial. The infamous Nundu Komar was set 
up to accuse him ; and as there was no villainy with which he was not familiar, it appeared at first, as 
if the accused would be found guilty ; after an investigation, however, which lasted two years, he was 
declared innocent, but he was not restored to the public service. On his removal from Moorshedabad, 
his office in the Nizamut was divided. The care of the Nabob's education to Munnee Begum ; the ex- 
penditure of the funds was entrusted by Mr. Hastings to Gooroodas, the son of Nundo Komar. Hie 
majority of the Council objected not a little to this appointment, saying diat Gooroodas was very 
young, and that to appoint him, was to appoint his father, whom the English never could trust ; but 
Mr. Hastings would not yield to their advice, and he subsequently paid dearly for this act of fi&vour to 
the family. 

The affairs of the Company in England had now come to a crisis. Great as the mismanagement had 
been in India during five years, between the departure of Lord Clive in 1767, and the appointment of 
Mr. Hastings in 1772, the conduct of the Directors in England had been still worse. Tlie Company 
was reduced by its own imprudent measures, to all but insolvent. Wlien the wretched state of the 
Company's affairs was made public, Parliament determined to take them in hand, for hitherto it had 
never looked into Indian matters. A Committee was appointed to examine into the abuses which had 
been committed by the Company's Government. After tlieir report had been given in, the Ministry 
perceived that nodiing but a radical change could save the Company from ruin. They brought for- 
ward several proposals for reform, in Parliament, which the Directors resisted with all their might ; 
but their misconduct had been so plain, and had so disgusted all men, that in spite of all their oppon- 
tion. Parliament supported the plans which the Minister proposed. Tlie whole form of the Govern- 
ment of India, was now changed both at home, and abroad. Some alteration was made in the manner 
of choosing the Directors, by which many evils, which had occurred in England were corrected ; snd 
it was ordered, that six Directors should go out of office every year, and six others be chosen in their 
room. It was ordered that the Governor of Bengal should be the Governor General of India, and that the 
other Presidencies should be subject to him in political matters. As there had been frequent disputes 
about power between the Governor and the Members of Council, it was settled, that the Governor 
General should l)e the sole Governor and Commander of Fort William. The Governor Grenersl, the 
Members of Council, and the Judges were forbidden to trade ; and hence his salary was fixed at two 
laklis and half of rupees a year, and that of the Councillors at eighty thousand. It was also ordained thst 



THE RIGHT HONORABLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND P. R. S. 49 

no ))cr9on in the service of the Company, or of the Crown should receive presents. All the Correspond* 
ence from India, which related to the government of the country, the Directors were ordered to lay 
before the king's ministers, 

Regarding the administration of justice, it was provided that a Supreme Court should be established 
in Calcutta, to consist of a Chief Justice at 80 thousand Rs., and 3 Puisne Judges at 60,000 Rs. a 
year. The Judges were to be independent of the Company, and to be appointed by the Crown, and 
the Court was to administer British law, to British subjects. It viras ordained that this Act, which was 
the first passed by Parliament, relative to Indian affairs, should come into operation on the Ist August 
1774. 

Mr. Hastings had managed the affairs of Bengal, with so much ability, that he was appointed the 
first Governor General. But notwithstanding, his talents and his success, great prejudices existed 
against him in England, and he was considered by those, who knew nothing of the state of affairs, as 
a man of the worst principles. The new Councillors, who were appointed to the Supreme Council, to 
act with him, were Mr. Barwell, of the Civil Service, who was in India ; and Colonel Monson, Sir 
John Clavering, and Mr. Francis, who had never been in this country. These three gentlemen came 
out with their minds, strongly prejudiced against Mr. Hastings, and were disposed to look with an evil 
eye, upon all his measures. As soon as he heard of their arrival at Madras, he wrote to them to be- 
speak their contidence. The Senior Member of Council, was deputed to meet them on their arrival at 
Kedgeree ; and one of die Governor General's own staff was sent down to welcome them. When they 
landed in Calcutta, they were received with higher honours, than had been paid to Lord Clive, or Mr. 
Vansittart, with a salute of 17 guns ; and all the Members of Council were assembled to receive them ; 
but their vanity was not satisfied. They complained to the Court of Directors, that proper honours 
had not been paid them ; that the troops were not drawn out to receive them ; that a sufficient salute 
had not been fired ; that they were received at Mr. Hasting's house, and not in the Council Chamber ; 
and, that the new Government, of which they formed a part, had not been proclaimed with sufficient 
pomp. 

When the Council met for business, Mr. Hastings placed before his colleagues, who were quite new 
to the affairs of India, a view of the state of the Company's affairs in every branch of business. But 
in this first meeting, those disputes broke out which distracted the Government of India for nearly 
seven years. Mr. Barwell alone sided with tlie Governor General ; the other three members invariably 
voted against him upon every question, and as they formed the majority, the Governor General became 
a mere cypher ; all power was in reality transferred into their hands. The measures which they 
adopted were dictated by their dislike of Mr. Hastings, and partook far more of passion than reason. 
Indeed it is a matter of astonishment, that in the six years which elapsed between the operation of this 
new plan of Parliament and 1780, the divided Government of India did not go to pieces altogether. 

The whole object of these councillers was to hold up Hastings to contempt. They would not listen 
to his admonitions or remonstrances, but only to their own passions ; and their conduct throughout 
was marked by much ignorance and littleness of mind. 

The natives were not slow in remarking the disputes in Council, and to see that Mr. Hastings, who 
was lately supreme, had no longer any power. Every man, therefore, who was displeased with any 
decision he had passed, went with his complaint to Mr. Francis and his colleagues, and was heartily 
received. The Ranee of Burdwan, the widow of Tiluk Chaund, came down at this time to Calcutta 
with her son. She was immediately put up to send in a petition, stating that since the Rajah's death 
she had disbursed nine bikhs of Rupees in bribes among the English, and their servants, and that of 
this sum Mr. Hastings had received 15,000 Rupees. He demanded to see the accounts in Bengalee 
and Persian, but she would produce none. Rewards were now held out to all who would accuse Mr. 
Hastings, and informers were brought from all parts of Bengal. Accusations came in thick and fast. 
One native presented a petition stating that the Fouzdar of Hooghly received a salary of 72,000 Rupees 
a' year, of wiiich he paid Mr. Hastings 36,000 Rupees and 4,000 to his dewan. The petitioner offered 
to do the duty for 32,000 Rupees a year. Even this stupid charge, which any man who knew the 
native character could see through, was received. Evidence was taken ; the majority of the Council 
said it was complete ; the Fouzdar was dismissed, and the office, upon the reduced salary, was given, 
not to the informer, but to another. In a month, another charge was brought on, Uiat Munnee 
Begnm had not accounted for nine lakhs of Rupees. When pressed she said that a lakh and a half of 
Rupees had been paid as entertainment money to Mr. Hastings when he went up to install her. Mr. 
Hastings said that the sum had been received and expended by him on the public account, and that 
the Company had been saved that amount. He also stated that the Nabob of Bengal always received 
1,000 Rupees a day for his expenses, whenever he visited Calcutta. Mr. Hastings' explanation was not 
satisfactory, but there is no reason to believe that the money was spent on any other than on a public 
account. 

As it was now seen that any accusation would be received, even the infamous Nundu Koomar 
brought up a com]Uaint against Mr. Hastings. He affirmed that the Governor General had received 
three lakhs and a half of Rupees for the appointment of Munee Begum, and of his own son Gooroodas, 
to tlie Nabob's household at Moorshedabad. Mr. Francis and his party proposed that Nundu 
Koomar should be brought forward in the Council to give evidence. Mr. Hastings replied, that he 
would not allow this man to come to the Board at which he presided, as his accuser. He said he would 
not degrade the office of Governor General in the eyes of all India by such base submission ; but he 
offered at the same time to refer the whole question to the Supreme Court ; Mr. Hastings then rose 
and quitted the Council, and Mr. Barwell followed him. Mr. Francis and his party, on their departure, 
called in Nundu Koomar, who read a letter, which he said had been written to him by Munnee Begum, 
rq^ding the bribes she had given. A comparison was made between this letter and one which she 
had written .to Government, and which Sir John D'Oyly produced. The seals agreed, but the hand- 
writing was not the same. After Nundu Koomar 'a death; the secret of this villainy was revealed, in 

H 



50 THE RIGHT HONORABLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND F. R. 8, 

hU poflneiision were found fac simtlt^ of the sealA of all the great personages in Bengal, lliere em be 
little doubt that the letter was a forgery, and that the seal was affixed to it by Nundu Koomar, mod not 
by Munnee Begum. Tlie Council, however, voted that Nundu Koomar*s charge was true, and ordered 
that Mr. Hastings should refund the money, which he of course reftised to do. While this aiUr was 
pending, Mr. Hastings brouglit an action for conspiracy against Nundu Koomar in the Sapreme Govt } 
and the three members of Council to show their dislike of the Governor General, went In a body to visit 
that native ; a step which had never yet been taken in India. It was in tiiis manner thsit Mr. Frands 
and his party continued for several years to thwart Mr. Hastings and to embarrass the Goremiiieat oC 
the country. 

A few days after Mr. Hastings* charge against Nundu Koomar, a natire of the name of Komal-ood- 
deen, brought an action against him in the Supreme Court, for having forged his name to a deed. 
Nundu Koomar was found guilty, and hung in the month of July 1775. The natires were thunder- 
struck when they saw one of the greate:(t men in India, and a Brahman, hung in the city of Calcutta. 
It was the first time in which a native of rank had ever been executed by the English. It is said diat 
more than a hundred thousand of his countrymen surrounded the scaffold. To the last they belieired 
that there was no intention of putting him to death ; but when they saw him actually executed, they ran 
down with one accord to tlie river, to wash out the pollution. Tlie death of Nundu Koomar has been 
charged upon Mr. Hastings, because it was Wlieved that he supported the prosecution. Bnt the ha. 
Ls, that it was the act of the Supreme Court, and this was one among the complaints whic^ were made 
against that tribunal Bome years after. There can be no doubt that Nundu Koomar was one of the 
most infamous characters among the natives. The Governors of Bengal had, one after the other. 
declared him to be unworthy of trust. He had been discoverd in a treasonable correspondence with 
the enemies of the English, and since the battle of Plassey had been constantly intriguing with e^ery 
party ; still he died unjustly. The crime for which he was condemned in the Supreme Court had been 
committed four years before the Court existed, when he could not have been subject to its jurisdictioa. 
The crime, moreover, was not capital by the Hindoo law. He was put to death, therefore, contrary 
to reason or equity. But he died enormously rich. In the various posts which he had filled, he had 
amassed a fortune of more than a crore of Rujiees. 

In September 1776 Col. Monson died, and as there remained but two members of his party, Mr. 
Hastings regained his power in the Council, because he had the casting vote. 

Wlien in 1772, the business of the country was transferred to European officers, Mr. Hastings 
thought it necessary that they should be made acquainted with the native laws. Under his patronage 
Mr. Halhed prepared, from native works, a code of Hindoo and Mahomedan laws, which was printed 
in 1775. Mr. Halhed was a gentleman of eminent talents ; he had come out in the Civil Serrioe about 
the year 1770, and applied himseif to the study of the native language. He made such progreasiB 
them as no European had ever made before. He may be regarded as the first Engliahtnan who 
obtained a classical knowledge of this language. This gentleman also published a grammar of it, tlie 
first which had ever appeared. It was print^ at Hoogly with a font of Bengalee types cut and cast 
by Mr. Charles Wilkins, and the first which had ever been seen. 

The disputes between the Supreme Court and the Government occasioned great misery to the conn tr y 
for several years. This Court was established in 1774, and made indejiendant on the Company's 
Goremment. The Judges came out with very strong notions of the oppressions to whi<^ the people 
were subject, and with the idea that the Supreme Court was the best remedy for those grievances. 
When the Judges landed at Chandpaul Ghaut, and saw the natives with their legs bare, one of tlwm» 
sud to the other, " see, brotlier, the oppressions to which the people have been subject. The Supreme 
Court was not established before it was needed. I hope our Court will not have been six months in 
existence, before these poor wretches will be comfortably provided with shoes and stockings." The 
Supreme Court was no sooner set up, than it began to enlarge its jurisdiction. It was the fault of 
Parliament that the powers of the Court were not better defined. Parliament had created two indepen- 
dent and rival powers in the country, and they soon came into collision with each other. Tlie Court, 
in a variety of ways, disturbed the peaceful government of the country and was the cause of much con- 
fusion during Mr. Hastings' administration. On account of the oppression of this Court petitions were 
presented to Parliament by the British inhabitants of Calcutta, and by the Grovemor General in Council, 
praying for relief. The subject was fully discussed, and a new act was passed which took away fH«t 
jurisdiction over the whole country which the Ct)urt had been so anxious to obtain. 

Before this act was passed, Mr. Hastings devised means for quieting the Supreme Court, by putting 
a sop in the mouth of the judges. He moide the Cliief Justice, Sir Elijah Impey, the Chief Judge of 
the Sudder Dewanny Adawlut, with an additional salary of 5000 Rs. a month, and 600 Rs. for die 
rent of an office ; one of the Puisne Judges was also enriched at the same time by a new office at Chin- 
surah, which owing to a war with the Dutch, had fallen into the hands of the English. About this 
time Mr. Hastings made a great im()rovement in the country Courts. He erected Civil or Dewanny 
Courts in various Zillahs, to hear Civil suits, and ordered the Provincial Courts to confine themselves 
to revenue affairs. Sir Elijah Impey, also having taken his scat in the Sudder Dewanny Court, drew 
up certain regulations for the guidance of the Civil Courts throughout the country. These were 
afterwards increased to ninety, and became the basis of the Civil Code of Lord Comwallis. 

During the Government of Mr. Hastings, on the 29th January 1780, the first newspaper ever pub- 
lished in India, made its appearance in Calcutta. 

Towards the close of Mr. Hastings' administration, he was employed chiefly out of Bengal, in mana- 
ging the affairs of Benares and Oude, in a war vrith Hyder Ally, the llajah of Mysore, and in negotia- 
tions all over India. His conduct in the Western Provinces was greatly censured in England, both by 
the Directors and in Parliament. It was even proposed in the House of Commons, that he should be 
recalled for having acted against the honour and interests of England ; but the vote did not pass, and 
he remained at his post. After having made another tour to Oude, at the close of 17S4, he returned to 



THE RIGHT HONORABLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND F. R. S. 51 

Calcutta, early in 1785, made over the keys of the Treasury and of Fort William to his successor, Mr. 
Macpherson, and embarked for England, where he jirrived in June. 

During Mr. Hastings' Government, in 1784, was founded the Asiatic Society of Calcutta, by Sir 
William Jones, one of the Judges of the Supreme Court, and who, as a scholor, had acquired great dis- 
tinction in his native land. The object of this Society was to inquire into the habits, the language, and 
institutions of ancient India. A number of individuals, who were fond of the same pursuits, joined 
him in this undertaking ; and their researches gave the first idea on these subjects to the European 
world. Mr. Hastings gave the Society the warmest encouragement, and became its first President. 

Mr. Hastings had no sooner landed in England, than the Directors, by a public vote, declared their 
approbation of his conduct. He was not without blame, in many of his proceedings in India ; but it 
must be confessed, that he acted with the utmost skill and vigour, and that it was he who consolidated 
the empire which Clive had conquered. Much of the censure which was cast on him, was due to the 
misconduct of the natives who were employed by him. Gunga Govuid Singh, Canto Baboo, and 
Devy Singh, were the three men who had the largest power, and made the largest fortunes during his 
reign. Of these, Devy Singh was, perhaps, the most unprincipled. As one of the farmers of revenue, 
he acquired a large fortune by oppressing tiie poor ryots. The unheard of cruelties wliich this infa- 
mous wretch practised, more especially at Dinagepore, can never be read without a feeling of horror. Of 
all this, Mr. Hastings was obliged to bear the blame in England ; but in India, the natives knew well 
how to distinguish between the orders of the master, and the villainy of the servant. During the first 
six years of his Grovemo^ent, he was thwarted by the Members of Council, who did every thing in 
their power to annoy and insult him. At the same time his authority was nearly subverted by the 
Supreme Court. But he nobly declared, that he would not quit his post, because it was difficult ; 
and he had a spirit and an energy which no troubles could subdue. During the latter part of his Go- 
Temment, he was engaged in a war with Hyder Ali, which eat up the revenues of the country. He 
was too often in great straits for money, and was sometimes obliged to adopt extraordinary means to 
obtain it. But on the whole he was a very great man ; he is held in the highest veneration by the 
natives ; and they teach their children to this day, to pronounce the name of Warren Hastings with 
affection. 

But however, great animosity continued to prevul against Mr. Hastings in England ; and at length, 
on the 13th February, 1788, he was impeached by the House of Commons, at the bar of the House of 
Lords, of high crimes and misdemeanors. The trial was conducted with unusual pomp. The royal 
family, the peers, and the peeresses were present ; and the ablest men in England appeared before this 
august assembly as his accusers. His conduct was sifted, as the conduct of no political character was 
ever sifted before. The trial was spun out by various delays to seven years, and, at length, on the 23rd 
April, 1 795 the Lords, with a very few exceptions, acquitted him of all the charges which had been 
brought against him. 

The law expenses during the impeachment bore heavy on Mr. Hastings, and although an idea had 
gone forth of his immense wealth, and his name and that of his wife, were never mentioned without 
being associated with crores of Rupees, necklaces of diamonds, &c. &c., after paying his various debts in 
1786, the sum total of his fortuue amounted to no more than 65,313i:f. 138. 6d. 

On this his friends proposed to reimburse the Grovemor General, out of the revenues of the Com- 
pany, on account of the legal expenses incurred by him in making his defence ; as the case was found- 
ed on the public acts of his Government in Bengal. An annuity of 5000.£^. was also voted, and the 
whole proposition was submitted to the Board of Commissioners for the affairs of India, by the Direc- 
tors, for their approval and confirmation, pursuant to the act of Parliament. But some legal difficul- 
ties intervening, the original vote was never completed ; and it was not until March 2d, 1796, that the 
then chairman. Sir Stephen Lushington, informed a General Court, ** that a vote for annuity of 4000j^. 
per annum, for 28 years and a half, had been passed by the Court of Directors, and confirmed by the 
Board of Control, and that the law expenses should also be cleared, although the precise mode had 
not yet been settled. 

From this moment Mr. Hastings seems to have courted obscurity. His lady, indeed, went to 
Court ; and was received with distinguished respect by Her Majesty, but Mr. Hastings received no 
mark of royal favour until the death of Mr. Burke and Mr. Fox, and most of those who had managed 
the prosecution against him ; it was not until then that the rank and distinction of a privy counsel- 
lor was bestowed on him. 

The remainder of his life was spent at Daylesford, the scene of his boyish days, in adorning his 
grounds, and improving his estate. And he lived here among pleasing thoughts and delightful asso- 
ciations. He lived long enough to behold many of his plans laid for the aggrandizement of British 
India realized, through the agency of others : for the brilliant acquisition of the Marquises of Wellesly 
and Hastings, are to be considered but as the early projects of a man whose gigantic ambition had 
grasped at the subjugation of all Asia. At length, having attained his 75th year, he died August 22nd, 
1818. In private life, M^. Hastings lias always been represented as amiable, conciliating, and seduc- 
tive. As a public servant he achieved much for the permanent benefit and advantage of his employers : 
and it must be allowed, that he rendered the English name and exploits known to the most distant re- 
gions of India. 

In token of grateful testimony of the benefits he conferred upon India, his statue is placed at the 
Town Hall; with the following Inscription : — 

To the Right Honorable Warren Hastinfi^s* 
MDCCCXXX. 



^ V >-' s/ Xy '- 'S.'N. ^ 



B 3 



62 SIR EYRE COOTE, K. B.— PRINCE HYDER ALLY. 

SIR EYRE COOTE, K. B., (Lieutenant General in the Army, and Comnumder-im-Ckirf of tht 

British Foreet in India.) 

Sir Syre Coote embarked last for India, in 1778. Exclumve of the most brilliant actions per- 
formed by him in the year 1760-1, his country naturally resorted to their deplorable, and e^erj tlung, 
but finally lost situation, on the coast of Coromandel, in the year 1780, when Sir Eyre Coote pushed 
through the North East Monsoon from Bengal, with only COO European troops, to the relief of 
Madras, rescuing this desponding, falling. Presidency, and effecting, by his presence and exertions, i 
fortunate change and extrication, from the seemingly impossible difficulties and dangers then snnxnmd- 
ing our invaluable Eastern possessions. 

Compare but the adverse circumstances attending the dL«aatrou8 era of September, 1 780, with the 
two ensuing successful campaigns of 1781, and up to September, 1782, when Sir Eyre Coote waf 
necessitated, by a severe fatal indisposition, to quit the Coromandel field ; and the recollectioo of 
facts alone, which prevailed at the periods alluded to, decide the high obligation Britain is under to him. 

The world in general feel not the real intrinsic worth of illustrious characters, or valuable posses- 
sions, till they are no more, or till we are in danger of losing them. Modem Eastern anecdotes and 
history most pointedly exemplify the truth of this afisertion. Now the value of our Eastern iKMseaaons 
begin to be, by degrees, partially understood ; it will be remembered by the British empire* that the 
superior abilities, personal successful exertions, zeal of service, established and acknowledged militaiy 
character of the late Sir Eyre Coote, in the hour of peril and extreme danger to the state, <jiecked 
the rapid torrent of invasion, restored firmness, love of enterprise to our army, and unifonnly led to 
victory. A very limitted number of infantry alone under his own immediate command, though opposed 
to the most fonnidable and numerous enemies ever encountered by us in Asia ; and that at the Gene- 
ral's decease, the British Military character in India, was happily recovered to his country, respected 
and dreaded by their enemies. 

Sir Eyre Coote died at Madras, and his remains were enterred under the Gallery of St. Mary*s 
Church, Fort St. George, with every mark of honor and respect, 

A whole length Portrait of this gallant General, is placed in the hall of the Madras Exchange. 

The monument to the memory of Sir Eyre Coote, erected by the E^t India Company, in testimony 
of their esteem for the character of this gallant Officer, is placed in Westminster Abbey. 

The work is at once an honour to great military merit, and to the ingenious artist, Banks, whost 
talents have so ably recorded it. 

The monument consists of two figures as large as life ; one is a Mahratta or Hindoo captive, 
weeping by the side of a trophy of Persian armour, representing a province subdued ; he is holding an 
inverted cornucopia, the contents of which are falling into the shield of Britannia. 

Tlie other figure is Victory, who, having erected the trophy, is decorating it with the portrait of Sir 
Eyre Coote, which she is hanging on a psJm tree tliat rises behind the armour. 

On the sarcophagus is an elephant, to mark the scene of action. 

The whole is intended to represent a province of the East, preserved to his country by the victories 
of the heroic Coote. It is placed near the entrance of the North door, and is twelve feet wide, and 
twenty-six high. 

On the Sarcophagus is the following Inscription, 

This Monument is erected by 
The East India Company as a Memorial of the Military Talents 
of Lieutenant General Sir Ejrre Coote, K. B. 
Commander-in-Chief of the British Forces m India, 
who by the success of his arms in the year 1760 and 1761, 
Expelled the French from the Coast of Coromandel. In 1781 and 1782 
He again took the field in the Carnatic, 
In opposition to the united strength of the French and Hyder Ally ; 
I'he numerous forces of the latter he defeated in several engagements. 
But Death interruj)ted his career of glory, 
on the 12th of February, 1783, in the fifty-eighth year of his age. 

Anecdotes op Sir Eyre Coote. 

It is a fact well known that the Sir Eyre Coote exposed himself too frequently during the wan 
in the Carnatic, both to the fire of the enemy and the heat of the sun. 

The General and his Staff were standing in a group one morning, when Hyder pointed a gim at 
them. The ball struck tlie ground near Coote; '• you had better move. Sir," said an officer ; «* yon 
are observed." ** Never mind," replied the General, *• they could not do that again." 

Another time one of his aid-de-camps observed that he had endangered his health and the ftite of 
the army by exposing himself too much to the sun. ''Tut, tut," exclaimed the veteran, ** the son 
has no more effect on me tlian on a deal board." "Aye, but Sir," rejoined the aid-de-camp, '* you 
should recollect that it is not the first old board that the sun has split !" 



PRINCE HYDER ALLY. 

Prince Hsrder Ally was the son of a person who served in quality of Killadar or gOTemor of t 
small fortress to one of the kings of Mysore ; also father of the formidable Tippoo Sultan. He is said to 
have acquired the rudiments of war in the French camps ; and, in the year 1753, he distinguished 
himself as their auxiliary, in the plains of Trichinopoly. About ten years after, being then at £e head 
of the Mysore Army, he dethroned his sovereign, and governed the kingdom under the title of regent. 
Soon after he extended his dominions on every side, tlie Carnatic excepted, until at last he was at the 
head of a state, equal in extent to Great Britain, and producing a gross revenue of four millions sterling. 
In 1767, 1768, and 1769, he was engaged in a war with the English. In thi^ war he displayed great 



VIZIER ALLY. 53 

spirit and ability, for making a sudden irruption in the Camatic, with an army consisting principally 
of cavalry, he came within seven miles of Madras, and dictated a peace to the Government of that 
place. But in 1771 Hyder sustained a total defeat from the Marliattah army, within a few miles of 
his capital, into which he escaped with great difficulty, with a small remnant of his army, and 
afterwards defied the attacks of lus numerous enemies, who possessed neither the skill nor the ordinary 
requisites for a siege. He waited in patience, till the enemy by desolating the country, were compelled 
to leave it. A few years of peace not only restored matters to their former state, but improved both 
his revenues and arms to a degree beyond probability : and at the same time, the distractions that 
prevailed among the Marhattahs, enabled him to extend his territories at their expense. In 1780, 
during the late war with France, Hyder Ally made a second irruption into the Camatic at the head of 
100,000 troops, both horse and foot, the very best of their kind that had ever been disciplined by a 
native of India. His success in cutting to pieces Colonel Baillie's detachment, and the consequent 
retreat of the Camatic army, occasioned the British interests in that quarter, to be given up for lost, 
in the opinion of most people in Europe. Happily, however, Mr. Ha^stiags, then Governor General of 
Bengal, and the late Sir Eyre Coote, Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in India, thought otherwise. 
This excellent officer soon put a stop to the victorious progress of Hyder Ally. With a force scarcely 
exceeding 7000 men, he compelled that indefatigable warrior to raise the siege of several fortresses, 
and on the Ist of July 1781, he gained a complete victory over his vast army, consisting of 150,000 
men. Hyder sustained successively six more defeats. That of the 7th of June 1782, was the last in 
which these two great Commanders were destined to meet each other ; nor was either of them present, 
afterwards, at any action of importance. Each died a natural death, within five months of the other : 
Hyder, toward the end of 1782, and Coote, in February 1783. 

In the Mauioleum of Htdek Ally. 



If Chance or curiosity, be the guide which brought thee hither 

Traveller; a roomeat stop — and know. 

Nature within this little space, hath fix'd her throne, 

hath here made the deposit, and sanctified the treasury : 

Here, pensive Contemplation dwells, and awful silence holds the gloomy veil. 

Which shuts out all the tinsel pomp of human prrandeur ; 

and term'mates with its inquietudes, the views of vain ambitious man— for ever ! 

Leave then these melancholy shades, and fly to scenes more vivid — more engaging 

to thee— but, sad remembrance there must yield for all thy trouble, 
•••••• Or, if thou wilt explore, if tired with the busy whirl of saUating life, 

thou art come to learn an universal lesson, pleased to behold trie transitory state of man, 

and draw a just conclusion. Behold this trifling pile, 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Hyder Ally, a Prince, 

whose origin was mean, obscure, almost beyond enquiry. 

But whose splendid and illustrious merit, 

Raised iiim to the pinnacle of sublunary greatness. 

With a head to plan, and heart to execute the various schemes in which he was engaged, 

He led his troops victorious — over vast countries, and conquered numerous principalities. 

His aspiring soul knew no bounds, and soar'd above the common views of Kings, 

As a politician— he stands unequal'd — as a Legislator, he was perhaps, too rigidly severe ; 

and, as a tyrant— all his actions were strongly mark'd with unrelenting cruelty ! 

But, prejudice and avarice were perhaps the Judges 

who pronounced the sentence : Go— search the annals that record the deeds of Kings, 

and see how few have passed throuffh hfe, without a blemish. 

If he had vices, death hath cancel'd them— nath dropt the curtain of oblivion. 

He is no more ! No longer terrifies— no longer punishes. 

His power is at an end— so are its consequences. 

If he had virtues, and surely he had some. 

Those, like his soul — from whence they sprang, alone exist. 

Be it thy care, to mark them iti the strongest and most attracting colours ; 

The voice of benevolence prompts thee to the task. While liberality aids the undertakins'. 

Holds to thy view, the mirror of charity, and bids thee remember thou art thyself A MAN. 

VIZIER ALLY, EX-NABOB OF OUDE. 

The vicissitudes of fortune were never more strikingly displayed than in the life and adventures 
of this singular man, who spent half his short existence in an iron cage. 

Vlsier Ally, bom in 1781, was the adopted son of Asuf-ud-Dowlah, late Nabob of Oude. His 
mother was the wife of a Forash (a menial servant of low description, employed in India in keeping 
the metallic furniture of a house clean.) His reputed father, Asuf-ud-Dowlah, was a wealthy and 
eccentric Prince. Having succeeded to the musnud (throne) of Oude, by the assistance of the East 
India Company, he professed great partiality to the English. ** Mild in manners, polite and affable 
in his conduct ; he possessed no great mental powers ; his heart was good, considering his education, 
which instilled the most despotic ideas. He was fond of lavishing his treasures on gardens, palaces, 
horses, elephants, European guns, lustres and mirrors. He expended every year alx)ut 200,000/. in 
English manufactures. This Nabob had more than an hundred gardens, 20 palaces, 1200 elephants, 
3000 fine saddle-horses, 1500 double-barrel guns, 1700 superb lustres, 30,000 shades of various forms 
and colours ; several hundred large mirrors, girandoles, and clocks ; some of the latter were very 
curious, richly set with jewels, having figures in continual movement, and playing tunes every hour ; 
two of these clocks cost him 30,000/. Witliout taste or judgment, he was extremely solicitous to 
possess all that was elegant and rare ; he had instruments and machines of every art and science, but 



54 SIR JOHN SHORE (LORD TEIGNMOUTH.) 

be knew none ; and his museum was so ridiculously disposed, that a wooden cuckoo clock was placed 
close to a superb time-piece which cost the price of a diadem ; while a valuable landscape of Claode 
Lorraine was suspended near a board painted with ducks and drakes. He sometimes gSTe a dimier to 
ten or twelve {lersons, sitting at their ease in a carriage drawn by elephants. His haram oontaxned 
above 500 of the greatest beauties of India, immured within high walls, which they were never to leave 
except on their biers. He had an immense number of domestic servants, and a verj lai^ anny, 
besides being fully protected from hostile invasion by the Company's subsidiary forces, for which he 
paid 500,000/. per annum. His jewels amounted to about eight millions sterling. Amidst this 
precious treasure, he might be seen for several hours every day, handling them as a child does his toys." 

Asuf had no legitimate children, and it was doubted whether he had any natural ones. He was m 
the habit, whenever he saw a pregnant woman, whose appearance struck his fancy, to invite her to the 
palace to lie-in ; and several women of this description were delivered there, and among^ the number 
was the mother of Vizier Ally. Several children, so delivered, were brought up and educated in the 
palace. 

The sprightliness of Vizier Ally, while yet an infant, so entirely engrossed the aiTectiona of the old 
Nabob, that he determined to adopt him. In conformity with this resolution, the youth received an 
education suitable to a Prince who was destined to succeed to the musnud. He is said, however, to 
have developed at this period a propensity to delight in the suffering of the brute creation. The aiSK- 
tion of the old Nabob towards his adopted son still increasing, he lavished upon him every mark of 
regard. 

At the age of thirteen his marriage took place. To give an idea of the splendour which attached to 
his youth, and from which he subsequently fell, it would be only necessary to read the accoimt of hii 
nuptials as inserted in Forbes' Oriental Memoirs.* 

When Vizier Ally was recognized by Asuf as his successor to the throne, great opposition was mani- 
fested by the old Nabob's family. He was, however, on the death of the latter, upheld by the English 
Government, and placed on the musnud. An adopted child, by the Mahomedan Law, is entitled to all 
the privileges of legitimate birth. 

Vizier Ally, after being elevated to the throne, showed a turbulent, restless, and intriguing temper, 
and broke his fedth with the English Government ; the consequence of which was, his bein^ deposed 
from the musnud, and Sadut Ally, the brother of the late Nabob, placed on it ; a pension was assigned 
to Vizier Ally of two lacks of Rupees per annum, (about 25,000/.) but it was considered necessary that 
he should reside near the Presidency, that he might be the more under the eye of Government. He 
in consequence proceeded from Lucknow to Benares, where Mr. Cherry, the Company's Reindent, 
had been sent to make arrangements for his proceeding to the Presidency. Shortly after his arrival 
at Benares, Mr. Cherry invited him to breakfast. He came attended by a large armed retinue. It had 
been previously intimated to Mr. Cherry that his appearance was hostile, and that he ought to be on 
his guard ; but he disregarded the caution. Vizier Ally complained much of the Company's treat- 
ment of him ; and, in fine, at a signal made by him, several of his attendants rushed in and cut Mr. 
Cherry and his assistant, Mr. Graham, to pieces. They then went away with the intention of pro- 
ceeding to the house of Mr. Davis, another European gentleman, holding a high situation under 
Crovemment, with the view of massacreing him also ; but fortunately he received some intimation of 
his danger before they arrived, and got his family to the top of the house, and posted himself at the 
summit of a narrow circular stone staircase. Here the ruffians pursued him, but with a hog-spear he 
defended himself for a considerable length of time, killing several of his assailants, which in a manner, 
blocked up the passage, till at length he was rescued by a party of the Company's troops stationed at 
Benares, which came to his assistance. The followers of Vizier Ally killed another European private 
gentleman, residing at Benares, exclusive of the two public officers above mentioned. 

Vizier Ally made his escape into the territory of the Rajah of Berar, a powerful and independent 
Chief, who refused to deliver him up unless under a promise of his life being spared. Hiis the English 
Government considered it expedient to accede to ; and he was accordingly given up and broug^ht down 
to Calcutta, and confined in the garrison of Fort William, in a kind of iron cage, where after an impri- 
sonment of seventeen years, three months, and four days, he died in May 1817, at the age of 36, and 
his remains were interred in the Mussulman Burial Ground at Casia Baguan. 

SIR JOHN SHORE,— (LORD TEIGNMOUTH,)— r/fl/« Governor General of India J 

There are few lives passed in the laborious and honourable duties of the East India Company's 
service in India more deserving of commemoration than that of Lord Teignmouth. The executrre 
administrations of India, amidst the records of the Bengal Grovemment, for a long and eventful series 
of years, have before them ample testimonies of his public services ; the few surviving firiends, who 
lived in familiar intercourse with him, will attest his private and social virtues. 

Mr. Shore was of a Derbyshire family originally, but his father resided many years at Melton in 
Suffolk, and died in 1759, ten years before his son obtained his appointment in the Civil Service of 
Bengal. On his arrival at Calcutta in 1769, the young Civilian was stationed at Moorshedabad, as an 
assistant under the Council of Revenue ; and, in 1772, served as an assistant to the Resident of Rijeshaye. 
He devoted himself with considerable assiduity to the Persian language, and obtained, by means of his 
proficiency in it, the office of Persian Translator and Secretary to the Provincial Council c^ Moorsheds- 
bad. In 1774, he sat as a member of the Calcutta Revenue Board, till its dissolution in 1781, when 
he was appointed second of the General Committee of Revenue. In 1785, he was reconmiended by 



* It is not uncommon for a Calcutta Baboo to lavish a lack of Rupees upon the marriage festival of his 
son. It is his ambition to surpajts in prodigahty both his contemporaries and predecessors. The nuptials of 
Vizier Ally at Lucknow in 1795 cost 25 Lacks oi Rupees, or about 300,000£. The funeral of tliis mao co^ 
only a few Rupees ! Such are the vicissitudes of human hie. 



SIR JOHN SHORE (LORD TEIGNMOUTH.) 55 

Mr. Hastings, who he accompanied to England, to a seat in the Supreme Council, as a public servant 
of distinguished talents and integrity. 

But the most prominent feature of Mr. Shore's early life in India, was his participation in the 
financial and judicial reforms of Lord Comwallis. 

After the long experience the Court of Directors had had of the judgment and integrity of Mr. Shore, 
it is not at all strange that they should have chosen him for the immediate successor of Lord Comwallis 
as Governor General of India, which he assumed on the 28th October 1 793. Eiconomical promises 
were made at home, and who so able to execute them as the man who had wound himself into all the 
intricacies of Indian finance, and whose policy in relation to the native powers was decidedly pacific ? 
Upon this occasion, Mr. Shore was created a baronet of England, with die title of Sir John Shore of 
Heachcote. Four years afterwards he was raised by patent to an Irish Peerage, with the title of 
Baron Teignmouth. 

On the first accession to the chair of Government, Sir John Shore had to steer between no ordinary 
perplexities. The Mahrattas were jealous of the growing power of the English, and thirsted for the 
spoils of the feeble Nizam, who existed only beneath the slutde of British protection. Scindia, now at 
the head of the Mahratta councils, looked to the power of THppoo as the best counterpoise to that of 
the English. If any thing can be fairly objected to the policy of Sir John Shore, it is, that he relied 
on the good faith of the Mahrattas to act according to existing treaties, which it was their interest to 
set at nought, and left his ally, the Nizam, in a state almost unprotected and defenceless. The first 
pretext of Scindia was the demand of the arrears of the Mahratta Chout (tribute) from the pusillanimous 
Nizam. 

About this period Scindia died. His nephew and successor inherited his policy. War between the 
Nizam and the Mahrattas was inevitable. In March 1795, a general action took place. Tlie Nizam 
was cooped up in a secluded fort, and being reduced to famine, was compeUed to conclude a peace on 
the most abject terms. Tippoo, in the meanwhile, remained steadfast to his fiither's antipathies to the 
British name ; at the same time, the affairs of the Nabob of Oude, who largely enjoyed the benefits of 
English protection, became so involved as to threaten the whole of that fine province with ruin and 
depopulation. He refused to pay his contingent for the Cavalry supplied him by the British Government^ 
To induce the Vizier, to introduce some necessary reforms into his administration, and to obtain security 
for the expenses disbursed in maintaining the power of the Nabob, the Govemor-Greneral undertook a 
journey to Lucknow. The result of the mission was, the acquiescence of the Vizier in the additional 
subsidy of two regiments of Cavalry, British and native. Upon the dimise of the Nabob, shortly after, 
a question arose as to the legitimacy of Asoph ul Dowlah, his son. The question of a kingdom was 
decided against him by the British Government, upon evidence, observes Mr. Mill, on which a Court 
of law in England should not have decided a question of a few pounds. By this decision, Asoph ul 
Dowlah was deposed, and Saadut Ali raised to the musnud, as the eldest surviving son of Sigah ul 
Dowlah. It is an intricate question of law and of policy, and the limits of this article preclude us from 
entering into it. But even Mr. Mill acknowledges that it is impossible to read the Governor Greneral's 
Minute, recording the transaction, and not to be impressed with a conviction of his sincerity. And the 
Court of Directors, in their letter of the 5th of May 1799, after a long commentary, observe : *' Having 
taken this general view, with a minute attention to the papers and proceedings before us, we are 
decidedly of opinion that the late Governor General, Lord Teignmouth, in a most arduous situation, 
and under circumstances of embarrassment and difficulty, conducted himself with great temper, impar- 
tiality, ability, and firmness ; and that he finished a long career of faithful services, by planning and 
carrying into effect an arrangement, which not only redounds highly to his own honour, but which will 
also operate to the reciprocal advantage of the Company and the Nabob." 

In January 1 798, Sir John Shore, who a few months before his retirement, was raised, as we have 
seen, to the Peerage, returned to England, having been succeeded by Lord Momington. 

Lord Teignmouth lived in habits of familiar intercourse with Sir William Jones at Calcutta, and 
succeeded him as President of the Asiatic Society. In that Capacity, he delivered, on the 22d May 1791, 
a warm and elegant eulogy of his predecessor, and in .1804 published memoirs of his life, writings and 
correspondence. 

On the 4th April 1807, Lord Teignmouth was appointed a Commissioner for the affairs of India, and 
was sworn one of the Privy Council a few days afterwards. His activity and zeal in the formation of the 
Bible Society, in 1804, are prominent features of his life, and strong indications of his sincere convictions 
and warmth of piety as a Christian believer. He had the honour of being fixed upon as the fittest 
person to preside over that Institution, and of which he was the President for 30 years. Up to the 
latest moments of life his heart beat high with philanthropic feeling. His oriental acquirements were 
consecrated to the service of the Bible Society. 

Lord Teignmouth presided over the Society in a catholic and amiable spirit of good will and 
benevolence towards all sects and communities of Christians. He conducted it throng many difficul- 
ties and controversies, some of which were unusually stormy and contentious. 

We must not forget to observe, that Lord Teignmouth was earnestly bent on converting the natives 
of India to Christianity, and in 1811, he published a tract on that subject, entitled, " Considerations on 
communicating to the inhabitants of India the knowledge of Christianity.'' 

Lord Teignmouth died at the advanced age of eighty-two, 14th February 1834. His widow did not 
long survive him. He lived surrounded by every tiling that ministers comfort to life ; the attachment 
of a large circle of friends, and the affections of an amiable feimily ; and his death was rendered cheerful 
and easy by the consolations of religion. Pew men have been more eminently useful in their destined 
spheres of action ; few have more amply merited the honours bestowed on them, or bettor vindicated 
their rightful claim to elevated rank by their talent and integrity, than Lord Teignmouth. We might 
enlarge upon his personal and private virtues, but we restrain ourselves, in the language of Tacitus ; 
** Abstineniiam ei integritatem htyu9ce viri ritferre^ injuria fuerit virtutumj* 



5C ST. PAUL'S CATHEDRAL. 

SIR W. n. MACNAGIITEN. BARONET. 

IVilliam Hay Macnaf^bteiiy the second son of Sir Francis MacnA8:Iitcn, for many yean one of the 

Juili;es of the Supreme Court in (Jah'uttu, was bom in the month of Au^ist 1793. He came to Indii 
at the ag(^ of ^ixteen, in September 1S(H^ a.s a Cavalry Cadet on the Madraii Establishment. Shortly after 
his arrival, he was ap]>ointed to do duty with the Body Guard of the Governor of Madras, in whofe 
family be continued to reside for some months. From the earliest period of his Indian career, hb mind 
was e^^erly bent on the pursuit of oriental literature, and he devoted the leisure of his easy appointmoit 
to the study of Ilindostanee and Persian. In May 1811, he obtained tlie prize of 500 pagodaa, whkk 
MM held out to tlie junior officers of the army as an encouragement to the study of Hindoatanee. 
Inhere was no rewanl ap)>()inted at tliat time for the succejwful study of Persian ; but with the Tiew of 
establishing his tpialitications for em])loyment in the Political department, to which his aapirations wen 
directed, he passed a satisfactory examination in that lan^ajs^. Soon after, he was ap|x>inted to a 
Cornetcy in the Itli Cavalry, then stationed at Hydrabad ; he remained with this corps for nearly a year, 
during which time he was invited to join the Resident, Mr. Henry Russell, in his visits to the Niam 
and his Mhiisters ; and thus obtained an early o]>portimity of becoming acquainted with the policy and 
feelings of Native Courts. Being desirous of acquiring some knowledge of mathematics, he wis 
permitted to join the Institution founded by Lord William Bentinck, for imparting instmction in tfait 
department of science, and made considerable progress in it. Six months after he had entered on this 
study, he proceeded on survey duty, and returned to Madras on its completion, and contiaoed hii 
studies in the Institution for six months longer. During this period, Government offered a prize of 
600 pagoda.s for eminent proficiency in Persian, and he passed a sectmd examination in it, and secured 
tlie reward. About the middle of 1813, he joined the escort of the Honourable Mr. Cole, the Residait 
of Mysore. He had already made some progress in a knowledge of the Tamul and Teloogoo langnafpes, 
and he now embraced the opportunity of his residence in Mysore to add to them an acquaintance with 
the Canaries and Maliratta tongues. Shortly after liLs arrival at the Residency, he was employed by 
Mr. Cole in the capai'ity of a Political a.ssistant, though not formally recognized as such hy Govem- 
nient ; but he was now to quit the Madras Presidency, and enter u()on another sphere of employmenL 

About the middle of 181-1, he received an appointment to the Bengal Civil Sen'ice. He arrived in CaU 
rutta with the most flattering testimonials from the Governor of Madras and from Mr. Cole. The Chief 
secretary at that Presidency was instructed to " notify the a]>pointment to the Governor of Bengal, and 
at th(; same time t4) enclose the honourable testimonies of the proficiency of Mr. Macnaghten in die 
Ilindostanee and Persian languages, and also to forward letters of a similar tendency from the Residpnt 
at Mysore, under whom Mr. Macnaghten had been employed." Mr. Cole's letter, coming as it did 
from one who was so well qualified to judge of merit, and who had enjoyed the best opportunities of 
estimating Mr. Macnaghten's attainments, must have been ))eculiarly gratifying to him. 

He arrived in Calcutta in October 1814, and entered upon the study of Oriental literatore with a 
flegree of ardour, which has seldom, if ever been surpassed. It is scarcely necessary to say that with 
the knowle<lge he brought with him, and his habits of intense application, he soon became one of the 
most distinguished students in the College of Fort William. It would be tedious to detail the various 
public encomiums whi(*h Mr. Macnaghten received for tlie successful study of the Oriental languages; 
and it may be sufficient to observe that he received at different times, six degrees of honour, and ten 
me<lals of merit, in addition to rewards and prices of books for his proficiency. At the aixteenth 
anniversary of the College, Lord Hastings, in noticing Mr. Macnaghten's exertions, stated, that ** there 
wax not a language taught in the College in which he liad not earned the highest distinctions which the 
Govennnent or the College could bestow.*' 

On quitting the College in May 1810, he was ])laced as an assistant to the Register in the Sadder 
Dewanny Adawlut, tlie highest Court of A]>i)eal in the Presidency ; an ajipointment eminently calculated 
to improve and mature his knowledge of the languages and laws of the country. In November 1818, 
he was deputed to officiate as Joint -Magistrate of Malda, and continued there a twelvemonth. In 
Febniary, 1820, he was appointed to act in the higher capacity of Judge and Magistrate of Shahabad, 
and during the two years of his incumbency, afforded the greatest satisfaction, both to the inliabitaats 
and his suju'riors, as the following testimonial will show. ** Tlie reported excellent state of Shahabad 
is consistent with what his Lordship in Council always anticipated from the services of Mr Macnaghten, 
and has afforded Government much satisfaction." 

In January, 1822, he returned to Calcutta as Deputy Register of the Sudder Court, and in the 
course of the year, requested that a Committee might be appointed to examine him in Hindoo and 
Mahomedan Law. Tlie Reports of its Members, Captain Lockett and Mr. Lumsden, in the latter, 
and Dr. Carey, Dr. H. H. Wilson, and Captain Price, in the former, speak in the warmest terms of 
the extraordinary proficiency he had evinced during a very searching examination. We need not load 
this article witli a transcript of these testimonials ; it will be sufficient to (|uote the flattering mention 
inatle of Mr. Macnnghten by the Marquess of Hastings, in the last address which that statesman 
delivered at the College of Fort William : " For these distinctions a successful candidate has recently 
presented himself and enrolled a name already honourably familiar in the Annals, and associated with the 
best eras and efforts of the Institution. Mr. William Macnaghten has shown in his bright example, and 
even amidst the engrossing duties of public station, that industry can command the leisure, and genius 
confer the power, to explore the highest regions of Oriental literature and to unravel the intricacies of 
Oriental law. The Committee of examination appointed to report on that gentleman's proficiency in 
the study of the Midiomedan and Hindoo law, have exjiressed a very high opinion of his attainments, 
and have pronounced him eminently qualified to consult, in the original, any work on the subject. It 
is true, indeed, that his labours have been |)rost?cuted beyond the walls of this Institution ; but within 
them was the foundatitm laid on which Mr. Macnaghten has reared so noble a superstructure." Within 
a fortnight aAer thi^ coinniendation, on the 5th of JiJeptuuibcr, 1822, he was gazetted as Register of the 



SIR W. H. MACNAGHTEN, BARONET. 57 

Siidder Dewanny, within six years after he had quitted the College. This important appointment he 
continued to hold for eight years and a half. The same extraordinary diligence which had raised him 
to public distinction, was now exhibited in discharging the duties of the oftice with which he was 
rewarded. In addition to the daily labours of the Court, he was enabled to carry through the Press, 
three vols, of die reports of decided cases, and those which had been allowed to run into arrears, he was 
i^abled to bring up almost to the date of publication. Of the cases published, more than two-thirds 
were reported by himself. They are remarkable for their fulness and accuracy, and are considered a 
standard authority on all l^al questions to which they refer. They enjoy the same reputation in our 
local Courts, whidi the most esteemed and authentic reports do in the Courts at home. While occupy- 
ing this station, he employed his knowldge of Sanskrit and Arabic for the benetit of the public, and 
compiled two works, the one '* Considerations on Hindoo law," the other on Mahomedan law — whi6h 
has proved eminently useflil in abridging and guiding the labours of the Judges. These monuments of 
his erudition and industry will long continue to render his memory grateful to all who are employed 
at the bar, or on the bench in this country. 

At the close of 1830, Lord William Bentinck determined to make a tour through die upper and western 
provinces for the facility of examining many questions of great interest and importance relative to the 
revenue, the police, and the judicial systems, and more particularly to expedite the survey and settle- 
ment of the North-west provinces. He was anxious to take the Council and the Secretariat with him, 
with the view of establishing a Government on the spot, and discussing and deciding the important 
questions which pressed on the attention of the public authorities. But it was discovered that the letter 
as well as the spirit of the law, was opposed to such a proceeding, and that the powers of the Governor 
General in Council, could only be exercised in Calcutta. The new charter which was soon afterwards 
passed, provided for such a contingency, and enabled the Governor General to proceed on deputation 
to any part of the Presidency with tiie full powers of the Council board, except in matters of legisation. 
Lord William Bentinck was constrained, therefore, to proceed on his tour without any other assist- 
ance than that of an intelligent Secretary ; and it reflects no small credit on Mr. Macnaghten that lie 
should have been selected by so excellent a judge of character for his confidential adviser, in the circle 
of difficult and important duties on which he was about to enter. Mr. Macnaghtcn's political career, 
through which he reached the highest distinction open to the ambition of the Civil Service in about 
eleven years, may be said to have commenced in January 1831. He accompanied the Governor Gene- 
ral in Ms progress through the provinces, and assisted at the investigations and deliberations which then 
took place. He afterwards went with his Lordship, as the official Secretary, to the meeting with 
Rui^jeet Singh at Roopur, where he obtained his first insight into the mysteries of Lahore policy. This 
training in the school of one of the greatest statesmen ever employed in the Indian administration, was 
eminently beneficial to Mr. Macnaghten in his subsequent career, and it placed him at once in the 
foremost rank of political functionaries. On the return of Lord William Bentinck to the Presidency 
at the beginning of 1833, Mr. Macnaghten was entrusted with the Secret and Political Departments, and 
continued to occupy this post in the Secretariat, both of the Government of India and of Bengal, for 
more tlian four years. 

Lord Auckland succeeded to the Government of India in March 1836, and in October 1837, pro- 
ceeded on a tour to the N. W. Provinces. He resolved to take with him the individual in whom his 
predecessor had reposed confidence on a similar occasion ; and it would have been difficult to point out 
any individual, with the exception of Mr. Prinsep, better qualified, from his knowledge of Uic internal 
machinery of the Government, and its political relations with subordinate or independent states, to give 
his Lordship sound and salutary advice. 

In October 1837, he left Calcutta, which he was never destined to revisit, but in which he was to 
find a melancholy but honourable grave. He proceeded to Simla in the 8i;ite of the Governor General. 
In the following year. Lord Auckland deemed it necessary to despatch the expedition across the Indus, 
to avert the dangers which appeared to menace the empire from the machinations of Russia, and the 
hostile movements of Persia ; and he entrusted the political management of it to Mr. Macnaghten, in 
the Capacity of Envoy and Minister to His Majesty Shah Soojah. It was in connection with this enter- 
prize which opened with the most brilliant success, but was subsequently marked by the most signal 
disasters, that he has obtained so conspicuous a place in the history of India, and it is upon his con- 
duct, in this difficult and responsible post, that his character as a public man hinges. In this personal 
memoir, we do not profess to enter upon the broad and much debated ground of the political expedi- 
ency or justice of the expedition, which involves so great a variety of considerations. Our object is 
limitted to the individual conduct of the Envoy in this new and untrodden path, during the last three 
years of his life. 

The measure which appeared to the public authorities the most advisable for carrying their plan into 
effect, was the esfAblishmcnt of a Government in Aflfghanislan bound to us by the tics of gratitude and 
a common interest, by the substitution of Shah Soojali on the throne of Cubool in the room of Dost 
Mahomed. There were abundant proofs before our Government of the tyranny of Dost Mahomed ; 
and it was asserted by officers who professed to know the country, and the assertion was supported by 
invitations to return from every chief of note — that the legitimate monarch would be received with open 
arms by the Aifghans. He had on one occasion attempted the recovery of his paternal throne without 
our aid 4 he had been joined by many chiefs of note, and was within a tittie of success. It was felt that 
Affghanistan, in his hands, would cease to be the theatre of intrigues against our power. 

"VVTien the expedition had been determined on, Mr. Macnaghten was deputed to Lahore to conclude 
the tripartite treaty between Runjeet Sing, Shall Soojah, and the British Govenmient. This was the 
first negociation in which he had been employed, and the skill with which it was managed, earned for 
him the warm commendation of the Governor General. On his return arrangements were made for 
the assemblage of an Army, intended to raise the siege of Herat and to accompany Shah Soojah to 
Cabool. Mr. Macnaghten was selected aj Minifter at the Court of the Shah to represent our interests, 

I 



58 SIR W. H. MACNAGIITEN, BARONET. 

and to watch over the progress of events in Central Asia. No man appeared fitter for this duty thaa 
Mr. Macnaghten ; he was intimately ac(|iuiinted with the native languages, and with the habits and feel- 
ingly, and policy of the natives. He was an officer of large experience in public affairs, and of soimd 
judgment. He was accordingly gazetted Envoy and Minister on the Ist October, and accompanied 
Lord Auckland to the great gathering of the troops at Ferozepore. Wliile the army was encamped there, 
it was announced that the Persians had raised the siege of Merat, and retired, which event rendered it 
advisable to reduce the army by one-half, which set out on its long and dreary march through nntrodden 
deserts and mountain defiles to seat the Shall on tiie throne of his ancestors, and Mr. Macnaghten 
accompanied him as envoy and minister. A more difficult and delicate office than that to which Mr. 
Macnaghten was now a])pouited has seldom been confided to a suborduiate functionary in the east. 
He was the chief political Agent in an ex])etlition sent on an hazardous errand, through unknown 
regions, where the military or political experience accjuired in India could be of little avail. He wu 
to accompany a prince, whom our presence was likely to rendt'tr unpo))uIar, through a country of the 
most impracticable character, which had been the grave of many previous expeditions, to scat him oo 
the throne of hL< ancestors. lie was in a difficult position as to the i)eople of the country, and in t 
still more difficult ])osition as to the Military authorities with whom he was associated. The dipk). 
matic arrangements were placed in (me hand, and the military direction of affairs in another. In these 
circumstances it was scarcely possible that the two classes of offices should not come into coUisioo. 
on the numerous occasions in which either negotiations were to regulate Military movements, or tho» 
movements to assist negotiations. It required no small tact and temper to prevent the interruption d 
the object of the expedition by misunderstandings. The army reached Candahar on the 25th of Aprfl, 
but nothing particular worthy of such a notice occurs for some time after this in the career of the Envoj. 
The Military memoirs of the war have told how Ghuzni was taken, how the Dost fled, the subaeqncBi 
surrender of his family, and how the Shah was installed in the Bala Ilissar, and how a considerabk 
portion of the army was then sent back to India. We arc anxious to touch chiefly upon those eveoti 
which served to exhibit the character of the Envoy. At the beginning of 1840, he was honored witk 
the most substantial token of the approbation with which his conduct in Affghanistan was viewed, 
by being raised to the dignity of a Baronet. 

On the 3d of November Dost Mahomed suddenly presented himself, and on aacertuning that tfe 
Envoy was before him, dismounted and claimed his protection. The effect of this sudden apparitkn 
on the mind of the Envoy may be more easily conceived than described. All idea of retribution or 
revenge vanished from the mind of the Envoy as he took the Dost's arm and walked up to his house; 
the Dost, on entering, delivered up his sword, with the remark that he had now no further use for it 
Tlic conduct of Sir W. H. Macnaghten to the Dost was marked by the kindest sympathy and attentioii. 
The surrender of the Dost gave Sir W. U. Macnaghten some respite, and he was enid>led to torn hb 
attention to tlie reform of the internal management. 

In September 1840, Sir W. H. Macnaghten had been nominated provisional member of the Coondl 
of India, and in September 1841, he received farther token of the approbation with which his condoct 
had been viewed in the highest quarters at homo, by his appointment to the office of Governor of 
Bombay. He bad thus attained the higliost honours within the reach of any Civil or Military Servant 
on the Indian Establishment. If he had ambition for high ])lace, it was amply satisfied. He now pre* 
pared to quit Affghanistan, and had fixed the early part of November for the period of his departurr, 
but, alas ! how vain are human expectations. Tliirty-two days after tliis burst of exultation, be 
became the first victim of an emute which ended in severing our connection with Affghanistan. And 
the very week in which Sir William Macn.ighten was making preparations for his departure, he wis 
arrested by an insurrection which terminated in his own assassination and the destruction of the entire 
army. In a conference with Akhbur Kiian, the son of the Dost, the Envoy was shot dead with the 
pistols which he had a day or two before received as a present from him. 

Thus perished by the hand of an assassin at the age of forty-eight, one of the most distiuguiiheil 
servants of the Indian Government, just as he had raised himself by his own merits to the Kigliwi 
honours of the administration. 

It was no little relief to the feelings of Sir William Macnaghten's relatives and friends, that hb 
remains were not abandoned in the country in wliich he had been so treacherously massacred. Tltey 
were rescued from the pit to which the barbarous Affghans had consigned them, by the affectionate 
solicitude of his widow, and brought down to the Presidency, and were accompanied to their finil 
resting place by the whole body of the coramunily, and interred amidst the sympathies of the metn>- 
polls. A Monument is erected over his grave in the new English Burial Ground in Circular Road. 
The Inscription will be found inserted under the proper head. The following lines are copied fnMD a 
Tablet erected in St. Paul's Cathedral to his memory : — 

To the Memory of Sir IVilliam Hay Macnaghten, Baronet, of the Bengal Civil Service, 
ilis mind liberally euduod hy nature and enriched by edueution and research, 
was quickened into action by high and general impulses, 
alike conducive to good and jrreat results and to honourable distinction. 
Thus, that character became developed, whose excellence acknowledged 
without dissent, was regarded without envy, from the modesty which embellished it. 
Entrusted durmg a long course of arduous service with confidential authority. 
He advanced the reputation he had early established ; 
Until, whilst Envoy at the Court of Cabul, Honoured by his Sovereign ; 
And on the eve of assuming' the Government of Bombay, 
His bright career of earthly usefulness was arrested j revolt had burst forth upon the land, 
and on the 23rd day of December IB41, in the summer of his manhood, 
and his fortunes, in the forty-eighth year of his age, lie fell by the hand of an assassin. 
His public acts will be found recorded in the annals of his country. 
This memorial is the last tribute permitted to private friendship. 



THE MOST NOBLE RICHARD, MARQUIS OF WELLESLEY. 59 

The following Tablet is now in course 0/ erection in St. Paurs Cathedral, by the Compiler* : — 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Z«ouis Bruce, 
Cnptain IVilliam Bunrill Holmes. 
Lieutenant Charles Browne TuUocb, 

of the 12ih Re^nment, N. i. 
Who died from wounds received in action nt Ferozeshuhur, 
on the 2181 of December 1845. 
This Tablet is erected by their Brother OlHcers. 



4 

THE MOST NOBLE RICHARD, MARQUIS OF WELLESLEY, K. P. K. G. D. C. L., Scc. 

(Late Governor General qf British India.) 

This distinguished individual was one of the galaxy of great men by whom the reign of George UL 
was illustrated and adorned. England was called upon to confront perils, both political and social, 
such as she never before encountered, and by which the whole framework of her policy seemed about to 
be disorganised. And not the least among the remarkable men who were raised u]) to be her stay and 
her protection against the revolutionary madness which was desolating the rest of Europe, was Richard 
Colley Wellesley, whose abilities will bear a comparison with those of the most gifted and brilliant of 
his contemporaries, and whose services were only second to those of his illustrious brother, his eleve in 
the field. of fame, and whose renown is identified with the brightest page of his country's military glory. 

He was bom on the 20th June 1760, his biographer is uncertain whether at Dangan Ca«itle, the seat 
of the family, in the^ county of Meath, or at their town residence, in Grafton Street, Dublin. His 
father, the Earl of Momington, was remarkable for his musical abilities, and his kuidly and benevolent 
nature first it was that led to the establishment of a loan fund, upon the principle of the Monte Piete 
Institution, by which, while distress was relieved, industry was encouraged, and habits of thrift and 
economy promoted which, in many instances, raised the borrowers from distress and want to opulence 
and prosperity. Lord Mornington died on the 22d of May 1781, and his eldest son, the subject of 
our present memoir, wanted just one month of his majority when he succeeded to the family estate and 
title. He at once placed himself in loco parentis to his younger brothers and sisters, voluntarily made 
himself responsible for his father's numerous pecuniary obligations, and showed his good sense as welt 
as his filial affe^^n by placing the estates under the management of his motlier, by whose vigorous 
understanding ^^new well they would be better administered than they could be by one whose cares 
must thencefonlBi chiefly devoted to public objects. 

Let us now look at him during the most brilliant portion of Ids career, in his Indian administration. 
On the 4th of October 1797, he was appointed Governor General of India, having been raised to the 
dignity of a Peer of Great Britain, by the title of Baron Wellesley. He had acquired, while a member 
of the Board of Control, a considerable knowledge of the details of Indian government, and had, more- 
over, an opportunity of receiving information and instruction from the Marquis of Comwallis, with 
whom he was upon intimate terms ; which must have been of great service in imparting to him a living 
knowledge of the various parties and interests with which it concerned him so much to be well acquainted. 
Upon his arrival at the Cape of Cood Hope it was his good fortune to meet with Lord Macartney, 
Colonel Hobart, and General Baird ; all of them long residents in India, and having filled stations of 
trust and importance, which stamped a peculiar value upon their communications. From them he learned 
the perilous state of our Eastern possessions, from a French influence which was at that time making 
itself felt ; and he was thus early warned of the necessity of those precautionary measures, by the wise 
and vigorous adoption of which our Indian interests were placed out of danger. 

The arrival of a ship from Calcutta, with despatches for the Secret Committee of the Board of 
Control, was another of the lucky incidents of which the Governor General availed himself. He did 
not for a moment hesitate to assume the responsibility of breaking the seal, and possessing himself of 
their contents, upon the ground that he regarded it as ^' an indispensable part of his duty to obtain as 
speedily as possible the most authentic accoimt of events, so deeply affecting the interests committed 
to his charge, and of which any false impression might render him less equal to the execution of his 
public trust." His brother. Colonel Arthur Wellesley, a name since so renowned, had been at that 
time, a year and three months serving with his regiment in India ; and we may be well assured that 
his observations, both of men and things, were not the least interesting or the least valuable portion of 
the mass of information with which the new representative of the British Government entered upon his 
important duties. He was thus enabled to write a despatch to Lord Melville, before he touched the 
soil of India, conveying as full and as masterly an account of the perilous condition of Biitish interests 
in India, as if he had been a rraident for many years ; and to form plans of its future Government, by 
which the evils he had so much reason to apprehend, and which would otherwise in all likelihood, have 
wrested from us om* Indian possessions, were effectually prevented. 

On the 8th of June, just twenty-two days after he had arrived at Fort William, liis attention was 
arrested by an article of intelligence in a Calcutta newspa]ier, purporting to be a copy of a proc^lamation, 
in the French language, published by the Governor of the Isle of France ; and announcing tlmt two 
ambassadors had arrived from Tippoo Sultaun, with letters addressed to the authorities of the Island, 
as well as despatches to be forwarded to the French Directory ; the object of which was, the formation 
of an alliance, offensive and defensive, with France, for the purpose of expelling the English from 
India. General Harris jf^as at that time commander of the forces, and acting Governor in the Presidency 
of Madras, and to him Lord Wellesley immediately communicated this proclamation, with a view to 
such precautionary measures as the threatened exigency might seem to require. There are those by 
whom be has been censured for having taken so strong a step, upon grounds apparently so very slight. 
But he knew the man with whom he had to deal; and evea iif no such proclamation appeared, he felt 

1 2 



60 THE MOST NOBLE RICHARD, MARQUIS OF WfiLLESLET. 

the necejtsily of being on his guard ngainst liini. Tippoo has l>een rightly deHcribed as the royal tiger 
uf MyHore ; and the Mteulth, as well as the navage oner^^y of that formidable beast of prej, found thdr 
counteqiartfl in his character and his policy, whi(*h weic na wily nnd crouching as they were ferocioos. 
He could creep until he cnnie within a ii])ring of hbi victim, and the tirKt notice of bis a}^HtMch would 
be the bound hy which his enemy would be secured and all fiirther struggle with him rendered hope- 
less. Was Lord Welleslcy to wait until such an enemy had matured his plana, and, by means of 
French auxiliaries and French intrigue, gone far to accomplish his objects ? — No. Wisdom required 
that there should be promptitude and vigour in the movement by which this formidable danger was ta 
be arrested ; and while Lord Wellesley resolved that nothing on his part should be left undone bj 
which the British interest in India might be protected from attack, he took good care that his mea^ 
Bures should be so reasonable, that no just offence could be taken at them, if fortunately, his a|^rchei^ 
sions should be proved to have been groundless. '* You will," he writes to Greneral Harris, "there- 
fore, turn your attention to the means of collecting a fon^e, if necessity should unfortunatriy require 
it ; but it is not my desire that you should proceed to take any public steps towards the assembling tiie 
army, before you receive some further intimation from me." 

He did not hesitate a single moment after the authenticity of the French proclamation had beea 
fully established, to acquaint Lord Harris with his final determination, wliich was, to call upon the 
allies without delay, and to assemble the anny upon the coast with all possible expedition. 

"You will receive," he writes, •* my public instructions in the course of a few days. Until yoa 
have received them, it will not be proper to take any public steps for the assembling of the army ; bat 
whatever can be done without a disclosure of the ultimate object, I authorize you to do immediately, in- 
tending to apprise you by this letter that it is my positive resolution to assemble the army tipom ike 
coast. 1 wish to receive from you, by express, a statement of the force which you can put in motioQ 
immediately, and within what time you can m<ike any large additions to it." 

Lord Wellesley, although fully prepared for war, was by no means desirous of pushing matters to 
extremities, as long as any hope remained that security might be obtained by amicable ni^;otiation. He 
accordingly continued to press upon the Sultaun the expediency of such measures as their oommoa 
interests required, and as were indispensable, if friendly relations were to be observed ; and rcceiTed 
from him the most glowing assurances of undiminished respect and regard, even up to the very mo* 
ment when the campaign was commenced, which he confidently })elieved must end in our deatructioo. 

When all was ready for action, Tippoo announced to Lord Wellesley that he was going upon '* i 
hunting expedition." He did not, however, thus elude the vigilance of his eagle-cy^L obaenrer. The 
necessary orders had already been g^ven for the march of our troops into the territo^Bf MjTSore ; and 
it soon became manifest to all men, that, had there been less of foresight or of vij^^Rn anticipating 
and providing against hostile designs, there would have been, humanely speaking, but little ^^^^^r* of 
contending successfully against such an enemy. His first movements are thus described :— • 

" Having succeeded in raising an cx])ectation, that it was his intention to move in the direction of 
Mahgalore, he secretly left his camp on the 28th of February, at the head of twelve thousand men, 
and rapidly marching across the country, passed the frontier, and quitting his own territories, sudden- 
ly fell upon the Bombay army, under General Stuart, the total sti*ength of which was 6,420. It is 
important to remark, as a commentary upon all Tippoo's pacific professions, tliat he began this move- 
ment five days before General Harris entered Mysore, and that he was engaged in an attempt to cut to 
pieces by surprise the British force at Seedapore, in the dominions of one of the allies of Great Britain, 
at the very moment that at the opposite side of the kingdom, General Harris was entering Mysore. 
Tippoo succeeded in throwing a body of his troops between tlu' detachments of Generals Stuart and 
Hartley, and for a time, threatened the annihilation of the British force. Eventually, however, Tippoo 
was repulsed at all points ; and without awaiting to strike a second blow, hurried back to Seringapa- 
tam. In this affair, the British lost 43 men : Tippoo's loss was, doubtless, considerable. 

" Tippoo now concentrated his whole force against the aiiny of Madras, under General Harris, and 
endeavoured to make an impression upon it, before a junction was formed between the forces of Generals 
Harris and Stuart. Tip])oo Sultaun in person led on a furious onset on the British lines at MaUavefly , 
remarkable as tlie place where the illustrious hero of a hundred fights, then Colonel W'ellesley, fought 
his first battle in India. A formidable body of Mysore horse bore down upon Colonel WeUesley's 
division, consisting of the 33rd regiment and the Nizam's forces. The 33rd were ordered to reserre 
their fire till the enemy were within pistol shot ; they then poured in a dreadful fire, and, quickening 
step, attacked Tippoo's trooi)s with the bayonet. General Floyd's dragoons, from the centre, charged at 
this crisis and a total route of the Mysoreans took place. They fled, haring suffered a loss of two 
thousand, who fell in the field or in flight. 

On the 7th of April, 1799, General Harris sat down before Seringapatam, and it was not until then 
that Tippoo bethought himself of endeavouring to avert the threatened calamity by n^|;ociation. It is 
amusing to read the lamb-like letters in which the baflled tiger now expresses his surprise that bis 
capital should thus be assailed ! He cannot at ail understand it ! His firm adherence to treaties is con- 
fidently asserted ; and he wonders how he could ever be regarded by the British as anything but their 
most steadfast friend ! But the die was cast. It was too late now to counterfeit or expostulate ; and 
the only terms which were offered to his acA%])tance by tlie British General were such as, if accepted, 
must have from henceforth deprived him of all agi*essive power ; and his spirit was not yet sufficiently 
subdued to endure what he regarded as the extreme of humiliation. 

The siege accordingly was carried on with vigour. On the 30th of April, 1799, the breaching battery 
opened against the walls, on the 2d of May a magazine blew up, spreading daath and consternation 
amongst the inhabitants ; and on the 3d a breach was formed, whi(*h was deemed practicable, and 
preparations were made for the assault on the following day. To General Baird this important duty 
was entrusted, and it could not have been placed in better bauds. The intrepid advance of the storming 
party is thus described :— 



THE MOST NOBLE RICHARD, MARQUIS OF WELLESLEY. 61 

" Before daybreak on the rooming of the 4 th of May — a day memorable in the history of India — the 
storming party, consisting of 2,500 Euro])ean8, and 1,800 sepoys, were in the trenches. The General 
bade some of his old comrades of the 71st, who had on a former occasion been oppressed by Tippoo, 
to remember that they had now an opportunity of * paying off old scores/ At one o'clock the signal was 
given : Baird stepped out of the trenches, and, drawing his sword, exclaimed, * now, my brave fellows, 
follow me, and prove yourselves British soldiers !' It is scarcely possible adequately to conceive the 
anxious suspense with which the progress of the intrepid and devoted band, ais they dashed forward 
upon the * forlorn hope,' was view^ from the lines. 

Baird was rapidly followed by his mem, as he crossed the rocky bed of the river Cavery, which it 
was necessary to pass before tiie foot of the breach could be gained. Tlie General is in the breach ! 
the assaulting column presses forward in close array, volumes of fire and smoke envelope the assailants ; 
the hurrahs of the British are heard amid the thunders of the artillery — they rush forward undaunted 
by the deadly storm ; a chosen band of Tippoo's guards make a sally on the flank of the assailants ; the 
Mysoreans are repulsed with fearful slaughter, and the next moment the English colours wave from the 
walls ! These were the events of less than ten minutes. General Baird, and Colonels Sherbrooke and 
Dunlop, swept the ramparts to the right and to the left ; but encountered a desperate resistance from 
Tippoo's troops, who evinced great gallantry and devotion to the sultaun." 

Thus fell Seringapatam. The fate of Tippoo was sufficiently tragical. He fought bravely to the 
last, supported by some devoted followers, who resolved to perish with their royal master : and fell a 
victim to the vengeance of an enraged British soldier, whom he wounded in the knee when seeking to 
despoil him of some of his personid ornaments, and who, ignorant of his rank, instantly levelled at him 
his musket, and blew his brains out. 

The most ample acknowledgments of the merits and services of the Governor General were made by 
those who, before success had crowned his efforts, had expressed the strongest opinions against the 
course of action upon which he had resolved. No one saw any thing but certain destruction to British 
power in the inaction which they recommended, or could s])eak of Lord Wellesley's bold and vigorous 
measures but with a sentiment of the most exalted admiration. If, at the commencement of the 
campaign, he had his anxieties, now, verily, he had his reward. 

Nor is it to be omitted, even in the briefest account of the Indian administration of tliis distinguished 
nobleman, that he declined, from motives of delicacy, to accept one hundred tliousand pounds, which 
was proposed to be allocated to his use from the prize money of Seringapatam : a striking proof of his 
lofty disdain of personal considerations when placed in a high public trust, and which, it is to be 
lamented, was not exhibited by others, whose grasping eagerness for a dLsproportioned share of the 
booty obtained in Tippoo's capital, is in painful contrast with the gallantry by which it was captured. 

The Governor General's attention was now earnestly bent upon the settlement of the newly acquired ter- 
ritories, and such improved relations with the neighbouring states as might be a guarantee for future peace. 

Having been successful in his Indian measures beyond what his most sanguine hopes could have 
anticipated, and added to the Company's possessions an extent of territory which rendered them ten 
times more valuable than they were before, he has been accused of ambition and tyranny in his dealings 
with the native princes, and it has been more than insinuated that, being without any real cause of 
complaint, he sought for pretexts of hostility for the purpose of accomplishing their subjugation. 

Had not Lord Wellesley been a conqueror, he would, in all human probability, have been a captive ; 
and had not the Company's possessions been enlarged, the British would now have no footing in India. 

He found the seat of his g((vernment in peril, and its resources at the lowest ebb ; he left it in 
security and with flourishing revenues, more than sufficient for all its necessities ; nor should it be 
forgotten, even in the briefest sketch of the Indian administration of the remarkable man, that, having 
defeated his native enemies, and taken adequate precaution against a recurrence of hostilities on their 
parts, he was able to send a disposable force of eight thousand men, under General Baird, to co-operate 
with Lord Hutchinson in expelling the French from Egypt. 

He returned to England in January 1806, and found his illustrious friend, Wm. Pitt, fast approach, 
ing to his latter end. The Marquis has left on record a sketch of his character, which will be read with 
unmixed pleasure by the lovers of real greatness. Our space does not permit us to quote it at length, 
but we must make room for a single paragraph, in which an effectual negative is put upon those 
suspicions respecting his religious belief, which might be contracted from the brilliant ramblings of 
Lady Hester Stanhope, as well as the more saintly inuendoes of that excellent man, Mr. Wilberfore. 
Upon this subject Lord Wellesley may well be supposed to speak with authority : — 

** He had received regular and systematic instruction in the principles of the Christian religion, and 
in the doctrine and discipline of the Church of England, and in every branch of general ecclesiastical 
history. His knowledge on those subjects was a<fcurateand extensive. He was completely armed against 
all sceptical assaults, as well as against all fanatical illusion ; and, in truth, he was not merely a faithful 
and dutiful, but a learned member of our Established Church, to which he was most sincerely attached, 
with the most charitable indulgence for all dissenting sects. 

** No doubt can exist in any rational mind that this early and firm settlement of his religious opin- 
ions and principles was a main cause of that cheerful equanimity, which formed the great characteris- 
tic of his social intercourse, and which was never affected by adversities nor troubles." 

In the year 1821, he was appointed Lord lieutenant of Ireland ; at the time he had to administer 
Its government under the reform act, and found a tribunician power which more than counteracted all 
his efforts for the public tranquillity. 

With a great respect for the Christian religion, and we believe, a general conviction of its truth, we 
look in vain, in his life and conversation, for any proof that he entertained more than a speculative 
belief in the mysteries of redemption ; aud what is most painful, as he advanced into the shade of a long 
evening, there seemed to us to be less and less evidence, that faith, in the evangelical sense of the word, 
was realized. 



62 ST. PETER'S CHURCH, FORT WILLIAM. 

His circumstances were far from easy ; and then it was, and not until then, that the East India 
Directors nobly came forward and proffered for his acceptance a sum of twenty thousand pounds, ad 
a small token of their sense of hi^ merits and his sacrifices, while maintaining tiieir interests in India. 
His despatches were ordered to be printed for distribution in the tliree Presidencies ; and a marble statue 
erected to his honour in the India House, in England as ** a public, conspicuous, and permanent mark 
of the admiration and gratitude of the East India Company." He died at his residence, Kingston 
House, Brompton, on the morning of Monday, 2Gth of September, 1842, in the 82nd year of his age ; 
and according to a desire expressed in his will, his remains were deposited within the precincts of his 
beloved Eton, the Seminary in which he had received his early education. The following lines were 
written in 1840 ; they are in reply to some complimentary verses addressed to him, by the present 
Provost of Eton, Dr. Hodgson, upon receiving his bust, which has been placed in the College Library ; 
and happily express the sentiment with which that ancient seat of learning, which witnessed the tri- 
umphs of his youth, continued to be regarded by him in his old age : — 

" Affulsit mihi suprcmte meta ultima Famae : 

1'uro mihi cum lauro juncta cupressus erit : 

Mater amata mearo quse fovit Etooa juventam, 

Ipsa recedentem signal honore senem." 

SAINT PETER'S CHURCH, FORT WILLIAM. 

Sacred to the Memory of the undermentioned officers of Her Majesty's tenth regiment, who died 
while stalioned in this garrison, and whose bodies are interred in the Military Burial Ground, Aiipore :— 
Lieutenant-Colonel Gerrase Power, who died 30th December 1842, aged 40 years. 
Major SavUle Broom, who died 16tfi December 1842, aged 43 years. 

Major Thomas Leech Z«ennoz Oalloway, who died 26th December 1842, aged 47 years. 
Lieutenant Hampden ZHtzf^erald. who died 2nd January 1843, aged 21 years. 
Pay-Master Francis Angn^stus wook, who died 18th March 1843, aged 31 years. 
This tablet is erected by their brother officers, m deep regret for their loss and as a mark of the respect 

and esteem in which they were held. 

In testimony of affection and regret, this Tablet 

is dedicated to the Memory of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas John AnquetU, 44th Regiment B. N. L 

who was massacred in the performance of his duty, during the insurrection at Jugdulluck, in Afg-hanistma, 

at Cabool, while commanding Shah Soojah's force, on the 12th January, 1842, aged 60 years. 

He was an officer of undoubted ability, and highly versed in the science of Military tactics ; was warm-hearted 

and possessed of the strictest integrity, and the most honorable feeling. Erected by his surTiving^ Soo, 

Charles Anquetil. 

Sacred to the Memory of the undermentioned officers of the 21st Royal Scots Fusiliers^ 

who died whilst serving with their corps, in the Presidency of Fort William : — 

Lieut. Wm. Macknig^ht, died 7th May, 1840. 

Lieut. Peter Craofurd, died 29th May, 1840. 

Lieut. Thomas Qreene, died 12th June, 1840. 

Capt. Arthur Zj'estrans^, died 14th July, 1840. 

Capt G. W. Nicholls, died 12th Augt 1840. 

Capt W. H. Armstrong, died 29th Nov. 1841. 

This Monument is erected by their brother officers, as a mark of regard and esteem. 

Also to the Memory of Mrs. P. Cranford and her dausrhter ^ 

The wife and child of Lt. P. Craufurd, 2l8t R. S. Fusiliers, who died at 

Fort William in the beginning of May 1840. 

In Memory of Col. W. H. Dennie, C. B. 

of H. M. 13th Light Infantry, who fell when lending a column 
Upon the Aifghan force under Akbar Khan, before Jellalabad, 7th April 1842. 
Col. Dennie served under Lord LAke in 1805 and 1806. 
During the Burmese war he twice distinguished himself. At Ghuznee on the 23rd July 1839. 
He led successfully the attack at Bamean ; on the I8th Sept. 1840, 
He defeated Dost Mahomed in the Khoord Cabul Pass; on the 12th Oct. 1841, 
After Major-General Sir II Sale was wounded, he directed the movements in a spirited manner. 
At Tazeen and Jugdulluck on the 22nd and 29th Oct 1841, and between Gundamuck and Jellalabad, 
on the 12th Nov. 1841, he sustained his military reputation. At Jellalabad 
On the 1st Dec. 1841, and 11th March 1842, he lei two successful sorties, 
lliis tablet is erected by the Commander-in-chief and officers of H. M. Army in India, to record the 

deeds of a brav% Soldier. 



In Memory of 
Lt-Col. R. ZS. Chambers, Surgeon ZS. F. Harpur, 

Capt. S. M. Blair, Lieut. H. V. Basett, 

Capt. J. Bott. Lieut. Z«. H. Hardiman, 

Capt. P. S. Hanulton, Veterinary Sure-eon J. IVillis, 

Ut.-Capt. F. OoUyer, Hiding Master R. Qnaatrill, 

Of tlie 5th Regiment Bengal Cavalry, who, with almost the entire of the 3d, 4iti, 5th, and 6th troops of 
the corps, fell in gallant but hopeless conflict in the disastrous retreat from Cabool, between the 

6tli and 13ih of January 1842. 

The surviving officers of the regiment erect this tablet. The lamented brave whose deaths it record*, 

though greatly outnumbered by n most treacherous foe in snowy wastes and rugged defiles, tor 

several days and nights together, without the shelter even of a tent, and suffering from the 

extremes of cold, hunger and thirst, in the depth of an Affghan winte.r, sold their lives 

dearly as became British soldiers. 
** How are the mighty fallen, and the weapons of war perished."— 11 Sam. v. 2, ?• 



ST. JAMES' CHURCH. 63 

Sacred to the MemorY of Gkorre Hamilton, Esq. Lt. 24tli Regrt N.I. 

Killed in action at Moodiue« on the I9th December 1846. 

Also of his sifter, Slisa Suphemia, 

the beloved wife of Frederick l*hornton Raikes, late Lt. H. M. 62Qd Refft, 

Died at Meerut, 16th March 1845. 

And to their younf? child, 

Marf^aret Qeorciana EUanor Ralkes, 

Died at UmbaUah, 20ih Auffust, 1845. 

Sacred to the Memory of the European and Native officers, 

Non-commissioned officers and men, of the fifth Regiment of Native Infantry, 

who fell in Affghanistau, in the year 1841 and 1842. 

Names. 

Lieut IV. H. Tombs, 






Lt.-Col. T. S. Olirer, 
Major 8. Sinrayne, 
Capt. W. Mackintosh, 

., O.lV.HaiflT, 
,, R. M. Milss, 
„ Z«. B. Z«ock, 
„ F. W. Burkinyounflf, 
Lieut. A. F. O. Deas, 

This Monument is erected by Major J. Jervis ; Capts. B. Bygrave, W. C. Birch, 
J. C. Salkeld, R. Dowson ; Lieuts. £. S. Garstir, M. J. Slater, and C. C. Grigan, 

the surviving- officers of this ill-fated Regiment, 
To commemorate tlicir regard for their fallen comrades. 



„ C. B. ZSorslmrg^'hi 
R. H. Alexander, 
F. H. Warren, 
A. D. Poten^er, 
Asst. Surgeon F. R. Metcalfe, 
Sergt Major W^GIodfrey, 
Qr. Mr. Sergt. 



ST. JAMES' CHURCn. 

(THE REV. W. H. ROSS.— CAoptein qf St, Jamet* ChurchO 
The Rev. IVilliam Hunter Ross, arrived in this country in December, 1843, and succeeded the 
Rev. Henry Thomas as Assistant Chaplain of St. James' Church. For about two months be conducted 
the duties of his charge alone, till the arrival of the Rev. W. O. Ruspini, who was appointed his co-adjutor, 
as Senior Chaplain. After three or four months Mr. Ruspini was removed to the Cathedral, and for 
six weeks or two months previous to his demise he had again the sole charge. 

The deceased clergyman was of a very humble turn of mind, and his intercourse with his parishoners 
was characterized by great good nature. On Sunday the 4th August, he was at his post, and on 
Tuesday following he complained of feeling ill, and died the following day by an appoplezy. 

Ttie following it an Inscription placed in St, James* Church, 

Sacred to the Memory of Reverend lVillian& Hunter Ross, 

Junior Chaplain at St James' Church, 

who departed this life on the 7th August 1844, aged 36 years. 

** Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord."— Rev. Chap 14, v. 13. 



ST. THOMAS' CHURCH, FREE SCHOOL. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
MarjBird, 

By Uie junior members of this congregation, especially those of her own sex, in grrateful and aflfectionate 

remembrance of her pious unweaned labours for their good. 

Bom May 29th 1787 ; died May 29th, 1834. 

*' The Righteous shall be held iu everlasting remembrance."— Ps. cxii. 6. 



MISS MARY BIRD. 

There are few occasions which remind us so forcibly of our own insignificance, as being called upon 
to record the departure from this world of those whose place we cannot see the means of supplying < 
and such is pre-eminently the case with her whose lamented death is here noticed. All who knew, 
or had even heard of Miss Bird, will readily confess no one exists in India on whom her mantle can 
fall — no one, who after seeing her exertions, can go and do likewise. It is not possible in this brief 
notice to say all that could be said of the deceased. Few lives could more beautifully exemplify the 
Christian character ; but it will be a mehmcholy satisfaction to her friends to see even an attempt to 
record her virtues. 

Miss Bird, the eldest daughter of Robert Bird, Esq. of Taplon, Bucks, devoted her time and 
talents during her early life to the instruction of the poor and ignorant in the neighbourhood, in 
which her father resided ; but though much might be said of her labours in England, it is with 
her unwearied zeal in India, that we have now to do. She arrived in this country in 1823, and 



64 ST. THOMAS* CHURCH, FREE SCHOOL. 

proceeded to her brother, R. M. Bird, Esq. of tlic Civil Service, then stationed at Gomckpore, a 
place well suited to her taate. A Mission of the Established Church had ahready been formed there in 
which she imiuediutely became warmly interested, and with tlic view of instructiug the Native females 
connected with it, she commenced tlie stuuy of Hindoostanee. Her extreme quicknesa soon enbled her 
to make rapid progress, and besides assistmg in 8U{)erintending the boys' schools, she collected one on 
her own premises for Native females ; she was thus occupied in the same benevolent way she had beea 
in England, visiting and instructing the young and ignorant ; nor was this all, for her she commenced 
translating elementary works into Hindoostanee, and continued to devote some portiGQ of her tima 
daily to this usefiil employment till her lamented death. In this interval she paid some short viaits to 
the neighbouring Missionary stations, and also to Calcutta, for the purpose of contributing to the com< 
fort of a younger brother sutfering severely under the bereavement of an amiable wife, who fell a victim 
to cholera ; the same frightful disease tliat so suddenly terminated tlie life and labours of his admirable 
sister. In 1830, she finally quitted Gomckpore and came to Calcutta with the intention of remaining 
as long as she could be useful ; and with a courage which those only who knew the real aensttivenefli 
of her nature can estimate, she commenced seeking where she could do good, and when once this was 
found, nothing could deter her from prosecuting her labours, till fruits of success were Tisible. No 
power but love could thus have animated a feeble delicate and timid female. Love to God in the first 
place, love to her fellow-beings in the next, though most acutely alive to the opinions of those she 
lived amongst, she still pursued her way through evil report and good report. The path she marked 
out for herself, new and hitherto untrodden, was to visit in their homes, tlie numeroos females descended 
from Christian parents, of whom Calcutta abounds, who speak Hindoostanee, but are totally unable 
to benefit by instruction in English, or read any language at all. To these persons Miss Bird was the 
messenger of glad tidings, explaining and teaching the Gospel of peace with such earnestness and 
sincerity, that she seldom failed to make a deep impression. She devoted Thursday evening in every 
week to the instruction of these Hindoostanee females at her own residence ; by degrees, the number 
increased, and in the afternoon of Sundays for two years past, they were joined by a few nathe 
converts under the instruction of a Christian Moulovee, who assisted, by reading the prayers and exposi- 
tion of scripture, which Miss Bird had previously prepared. At the time of her death, there were no 
less than fifty-five females who were thus receiving instruction in the way of life eternal. 

This work, alone would have satisfied many and would even have been too laborious for most, but it 
was only part of her exertions for the benefit of others. Her method of communicating instruction 
was so happy that she was requested by several of the ladies conducting Schools in Calcutta to devote 
some time each week to imparting religious knowledge to their pu))ils, and this she most readily did. 
For the same purpose, she visited the Orphan School at Allipore ; she established a Bible class consisting 
of about 30 young Females, who regularly assembled every Monday evening. She offered her most 
cordial assistance in forming the Sunday School assembled at the Free School Church. She also once 
a week instructed a claits of native boys under the care of the Christian Moulovee, in €reographv. 
During this time her labours in English and Hindoostanee composition did not cease. Besides her 
Commentary on the book of Genesis, well calculated fur the improvement of famalies and schools, she 
published both in English and Hindoostanee, '* England Delineated," and fitted several valuable School 
books for more general use in India. She com])Ieted the outline of ancient History, and translated the 
whole of it into Hindoostanee. She finished a Tract on the Ten Commendments, which had been 
commenced at Gorruckpore, besides several smaller tracts. She translated also a small work on 
Geography of her own composition. Brewster*s valuable Treatise on Astronomy, with maps ; and was 
engaged on a History of England, which she had brought down to the reign of William the 2d, when 
she died. The above is a very imperfect sketch of what she did, and few can describe how she did it, or 
delineate all the excellencies of her character ; her mental powers were very uncommon ; she was r<»dy 
at acquiring and retaining and applying knowledge. 

In translating the wf^rk on a.stronomy she encountered many matliematical difficulties, which were 
new to her, but till she fully understood them, she did nut give up the study, nor attempt to continue 
the translation. As a remarkable instance of this, we may mention, that having to explain the compu- 
tation of the distance of the earth from the sun, she was not satisfied, till she had made herself mistress 
of the mathematical demonstration of the mode of doing so, by the transit of Venus, for the purpose of 
inserting it in her translation. She was perfectly conversant with the best English and French Authors, 
and possessed a fine taste. But all these literary qualilicalion.s, which would have been worthy of remark 
in others, were totally lost ^ight of in the superior excellencies of her character as a Christian. Jane 
Taylor remarks, what an honour to have been noted by St. Paul as one of the excellent and worthy 
women of his day, amongst such how pre-eminent would the deceased have been. Devoted in more 
than a common degree to her parents and family, dwelling with enthusiastic delight on their pleasures, 
and sympathising with their pains, she could still give uj) all for Christ. 

She could relinquish the comforts and elegancies of home and devote her time, her means, and her 
talents, to the poor and neglected of the land, and to imparting a knowledge of salvation to them that 
sit in darkness and the shadow of death. Her affections were as warm, her 8i>irit as joyous, her heart 
as guileless as though she had never known the cares or sorrows of this world. Wherever she wait 
she was a bond of union, and of love ; incapable of giving, she was equally slow at taking offence ; and 
would not believe that any one would willingly distress her. Delicately formed and exceedingly lame 
in consequence of an accident which occurred many years ago, her enthusiasm enabled )ier to endure 
such fatigue as many robust men would have shrunk from. Tlie evening before her death, she passed at 
the Kidderpore Orphan School apparently in perfect health, or at least as well as any one could be, 
during the extreme licat of the weather. On retiring at night she felt indisposed, but delayed disturb- 
ing any one, or sending for medical aid, till near morning, when the fatal disease was confirmed. The 
usual remedies of cholera were tried, but she expired before 10 o'clofk on the 29th of May, her 48th 
birth-day. She observed to a venerable and most beloved and revcied friend who visited her bedside. 



J 



ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, KIDDERPORE. 65 

that it was her birth-day. Hu reply was suited to the spirit of the suffering Christiaxii that it would 
most probably be her eternal birth-day. An affecting proof of the success of her labours, and the 
esteem in which she was held, was afforded by the crowds of old and young of the class, chiefly to 
whom her labours of love had been directed, that assembled at her funeral, all anxious to testify their 
affection and respect. 

It has thus been attempted most imperfectly to record some memorial of this truly excellent and 
devoted Christian. Whatever remains that we would have said, has been so beautifully expressed in the 
last Reoort of the Free School, that we cannot do better than conclude in its words : — 

'* TUe Governors cannot close this Report without adverting to the irreparable loss which the Free 
School has sustained by the sudden and unexpected death of Miss Mary Bird, one of their lady visitors. 
To her unweared diligence, active piety and cheerful disposition, no commendation of theirs can do 
justice." Regardless of bodily weakness, and a climate quite enough to excuse inactivity, she went 
about doing good to those whom few care to seek after. From house to house, she carried consolation, 
teaching the young and the aged of her own sex, where without fear of disappointment, they might 
And rest to their souls, the unsearchable riches of Christ ; the faithful saying, that Jesus came into 
the world to save sinners, was her delightful theme. On this she loved to dwell with that happy 
cheerfulness of heart, which imparted a peculiar charm to her character and on the affections of aU 
who listened to her discourse. On the Free School she conferred benefits, which will be remembered 
with lasting gratitude by many, long after their connection with the Institution has ceased. A week 
never passed in which she was not twice or thrice foUnd seated among the children, patiently con- 
veying instruction, as though she had been a hired servant, rather than a gratuitous friend. One so dis- 
interested, so zealous, so indefatigable, so desirous of doing good, is seldom found. Her memory will be 
dear to a multitude of sorrowing friends, by whom Ae will be honoured as one of those excellent 
women who have privately laboured in the Gospel, and whose names are written in the Book of Life. 

Sacred to the Memory of Maiy Anne, 
the dearly beloved wife of Thomas Kiernander, Esquire, Junior. 

Born at Allahabad 27th January 1821, 

and fell asleep in Jesus, at Calcutta, 28th November 1844. 

She has Itft two children to lament her loss, in common with her afflicted husband, who has placed this 

Tablet to her Memory. 
Blame not the Monumental stone I raise ; 
'Tis to the Saviour's, not the sinner's praise. 
Sin was the whole that she could call her own ; 
Her good was (ill derived from him alone. 
To sin, her conflict, pain and grief sh« owed ; 
Her conqu'ring faith and patience He bestow 'd. 
Reader, may'st thou obtain lilie precious faith 
To smile in anguish and rejoice in death. 

Sacred to the Memory of Captain James Minna Die j, 

of H. Co.'s. Steamer*' Enterpnze,^' who died at sea 26th April 1845, aged 40 years. 

He served the H. £. I. Company upwards of 20 years, and distinguished himself m the war with China 

in command of the H. C. Steamer " Madagascar," until her loss by fire,oQ which occasion, as well 

as during his subsequent captivity in China, his conduct was the admiration of all around him. 

He is lamented by many beyond the circle of those of his own family. 

" There remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God."— Heb. iv. 9. 

In Memory of SUaabeth, 

Wife of Charles Knowles Robinson, Esquire, one of the Magbtrates of Calcutta. 

Born 8th Dec. 1803; died 29th Oct. 1837. 
She was loved in life. The Lord did guide her wtth his couacil and afterward received her to glory. 

" Her children arise up and call her blessed. Her husband also, and he praiseth her." 



ST, STEPHEN'S CHURCH, KIDDERPORE. 

S acred to the Memory of 
the Rev. l^alter HoTenden, B. D. 

9 years Chaplain to the Bengal Military Orphan Society ; 

died at sea 30tb September 1832, aged 49. 

Emphatically the orphan's friend ; beloved of all and regretted by all. 

This humble tablet is erected by those sorrowing orphans, 

As a grateful record of aflfectionate remembraoce cherished by them of their revered Pastor and friend. 

** Feed my lambs, feed my sheep."— John xxi. 14, 15. 
The memory of the just is blessed."— Prov. x. 7. 
[January 23rJ, 1847.] 



<• 



1u the Memory of Frederic Stsdnforth, Esq. of the B. C. Service, late Judge of Chittagong. 

This house of God owed much, in its commencement, to his 
zealous and benevolent exertions ; 
his valuable life, adorned, as it was, with the more mild and gentle of the Christian virtues* 

Terminated at the premature age of 36 years. 

He died at Garden Reach on the 25th of September, 1845, 

In humble but sure hope of eternal life through Jesus Christ. 

" Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord." 



66 UNION CHAPEL, DHURRUMTOLLAH. 

ORPHAN BURIAL GROUND, KIDDERPORE SCHOOL. 

Sacn^ to the Memory of Mmri^arety 

The wife of the Rev. W. Sturrock, Chaplain on the Bengal E«Ublbhment, 

who departed this life the 24th of April 1846, aped 28 years. 

To the Memory of Ann S t m rock, 
Twenty years a boarder, thirty a ward, and (ive Head- Mistress of this Institution. 

Died 9tb of July 1843, a^ed 57. • 

To the Memory of 
Anne SlisabeUi OreraweU. 

Fifty years a ward of the M. O. S. 
Born January 1794 ; Died 5th March 1844. 

To the Memory of Marim mnnins. 

Second daughter of the late Captain and Brevet Major t. S. Wiggins, dlst B. N. 1. 
Bom August 9th 1829 ; Died June 17th 1847, aged 17 years, 10 months, 8 days. 

Erected by her loving brother George. 

SacrM to the Memory of 
Alncander Fercnsaon INcky 

Born 22nd November 1820; Died 27th February 1833. 

Sacred to the Memory of Anrelia ZiellAy 

Eldest daughter of Captain Stephen Davis Riley, of the Bengal Native Infantry, 
who departed this life on the twenty-eighth day of August, Anno domini 1820, 

Aged eleven years and seven months. 
To the sweet remembrance of an affectionate and amiable daughter this tribute of sincere regard. 

Master (l«or|^ James Oox, 

Died 3rd January 1823, aged 10 years and 7 months. 
Erected by Ann W. B. Cox. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Samuel Oldknow, 

Son of the late John Oldknow, Conductor of Ordinance, who departed this Ufe on the 

15th of June 1824, aged 7 years 2 months. 



UNION CHAPEL, DHURRUMTOLLAH. 

The interior of this Chapel contains many plain but effecting memorials of the brevity of buman life devo- 
ted to the noblest and best causes of Chrutian Missions, and which tells a sad tale as to the fearful nature 
of the climate in which these good men lived and died, and in which many are still permitted to labor and 
pray for the welfare of the people. 

To the Memory of the following Missibnaries of the London Missionary Society, 
who having faithfully laboured in the service of Christ in this country. 
Died whilst prosecuting their important work :— 
Hathaniel Pomjth, arrived in India in 1798. died February 1816, Aged 47 years. 
Robert May, arrived in 1812. Died August 12, 1818. Aged 30. 

Robert Hampaon, arrived in 1819. Died September 21 , 1820. Aged 25. 
IVm. Bankhead, arrived in 1822. Died October 1822. Aged 23. 

Joaepb IVarden, arrived in 1822. Died April 21, 1831. Aged 27. 

J. D. Pearaon, arrived in 1817. Died October 1831. Aged 41. 

Thomas Hifrps, arrived in 1830. Died December 3, 1832. Aged 24. 
James Robertson, arrived in 1826. Died June 15, 1833. Aged 30. 

" Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen, for bv it the elders 
obtained a good report ; these all died in faith, not having received the promises, bat having seea 
them afar off, and were persuaded of them and embraced them, and confessed that they were 

strangers and pilgrims on the earth." — Heb. xi« 1,2, 13. 

This Tablet is erected by Christians of different denominations as an expression of respect for the Me- 
mory of brethren who were esteemed worthy to labour and die in the Missionary field* 



NATHANIEL FORSYTH.— r3ftnw/«r in Me Dutch Church, Chiruurak and Mimonofy qftke 

London Missionary Society.) 

The Rev. If. Forsytli was bom in the year 1769, at Smalholm Bank, Dnmfries-shire. 

In 1797 he was accepted as a candidate for Missionary labours in conjunction with the Rev. J. Ed* 
mond ; he arrived in India the following year, and commenced his ministrationa in Dr. Dunwiddae's 
lecture>room in the Cossitollah. His attention was afterward directed to Chinsarah, where there waa 
no regular clergyman ; he sought and obtained permission to officiate in the settlement Church there, 
where his diligent ministrations were greatly blessed of God to the edification of his hearers, and dw 
promotion of a spirit of piety amongst the people. 



^^ 



UNION CHAPEL, DHURRUMTOLLAH. 57 

In 1809, he engaged, in conjonction with Dr. Carey, in opening the Lall Bazar Chapel, in which he 
continued to preach during the evening of the Lord's-day to the close of his life. In his character he 
seemed to yield an exception to the almost universal applicability of the declaration of Solomon, that 
the ^* fear of man bringeth a snare )** and he was quite content to maintain that coarse invariably allot- 
ted to the Christian Missionary, if he be a faithful one. *' He was gentle unto all men, apt to teach pati- 
ent ; in meekness instructing those who oppose themselves, if peradventure God would give them 
repentance to the acknowledgment of the truth." 

It was not until the last year of his life, that he was the subject of sickness ; during that year, he 
declined rapidly, and on the morning of the 11th February, 1816, his spirit departed. 

A stone in the Chinsurah Burying Ground marks the spot where his ashes sleep. 

REV. CHARLES PIFFARD.— (JfiMtVmary qfihe London Misnonary Society, died December 
IIM, 1840.) 

Through the political events of the period, Charles Piffard in his youth was compelled to reside with 
his family in France for many years ; on the return of peace, be returned to England and entered his 
father's counting-house. One Sabbath-day, excited by curiosity, he entered the Rev. J. Yockney'a 
church Islington ; he was led to perceive that there was more in religion than he had up to that time beien 
apt to suppose, and retired in a thoughtful mood ; the next day he procured a Bible, and it was not long 
ere the word of God produced its effects ; he was led to embrace the Saviour in faith, and had pardon 
and peace, imparted to his soul through the blood of the cross. He became zealous for the Lord ; and 
to advance his glo^, was the most anxious desire of his heart. He gave a proof of it, when he devo- 
ted himself to the work of a Missionary, at a time, when the sacred office was far from being popular, 
and when he had the fairest prospects at home. He went through his theological studies in Glasgow 
University, and at the Missionary Coll^^e at Gosport. For upwards of 15 years he laboured among 
the heathen, in various ways, and by various means, and not without success. Trusting upon the 
Lord for his blessing, he undertook all that Grod gave him an opportunity to undertake ; he esta- 
blished and superintended schools, wrote and translated and distributed tracts ; and as a preacher in 
the native language, he was one of the ablest, most zealous, active and persevering Missionaries that 
ever came to India. Mr. Piffard never drew any stipend from the Missionary Society ; but support- 
ed himself from his own means, which were ample, and with which besides, he did much good when- 
ever an opportunity offered. 

His remains were interred in the Scotch Burial Ground. 

A marble tablet is placed to his Memory in the Union Chapel, and the following Inscription is 
taken from it : 

To the Memory of the Rev. Oharles PUfard, 

who for 15 years laboured gratuitously in Bengal as a Missionary of the London Missionary Society. 

He died on the 1 Ith December 1840; aged 42 years. 

" He was a good man, full of faith, and of the Holy Ghost.*' 

His exemplary piety, especially manifested in his humility, catholicity, benevolence, and untirinflr zeal 

iu the cause of Christ, secured for him the love and esteem of Christians of all denominations, who 

have united in erecting this Tablet, as an expression of their affection for one who consecrated 

his life and property to the best interests of his fellow-men. 
Mr. Piffard was 12 years co-pastor of the Native Churches at Rammakal Choke, and Gungree. 
The tender and faithful manner in which he discharged the duties of his oflfice f^ained tor him the respect 
of the heathen, the confidence of his brethren in the Mission, and the affection of all the members 

of his charge. 
" A beloved brother and a faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord.'*— Col. iv. 7. 



<• 



Remember them who have spoken unto you the word of God ; whose faith follow considering the end 
of their conversation, Jesus Christ, the same yesterday to-day and for ever." 
In furtherance of the apostolic injunction, and of our Christian love for the late 

Rev. Samuel Tramrin, 

Missionary to the Heathen, who died at Moorshedabad, 

on the 3rd of August 1827, aged 3Q. 

This Tablet is erected. 

" He was a good man full of the Holy Ghost and of faith." 

And we beseech you brethren to know them which labour among you and are over you in the Lord, 

and admonish you aud to esteem them very highly in love for tneir works* sake.'*— Amen. 



In Memory of Radanatli Doss, 

A sincere and exemplary convert from Hinduism, 

For upwards of 12 years a faithful, discreet and truly useful Christian Catechist and Missionary to the 

heathen in connexion witli the London Missionary Society. 

He fell asleep iti Jesus on the 2ud April 1844, aged 29 years. 

" A brand plucked out of the burning." 



REV. J. KEITH. 

On Monday the 7th October, 1822, Rev. Mr. Keith fell asleep in the bosom of his Redeemer. His 
loss had not only b^ felt by the London Missionary Society to whidihe belonged, but by the Christian 
community at large. Could the native population of India become sensible of how sincere a friend 
Providence has called from labour to eternal rest, they also would deeply regret his decease. A 
more zealous friend of the heathen — a man more concerned for the welfare of the institution to which 



K 



68 ST. ANDREW'S KIRK. 

he wai atUched, and a more indefiatigablc labourer io the vineyard of his Lord, the page of history hai 
seldom to record. 

On this occasion we adopt the melancholy strains of Abnei's diri^, and join the Royal nummer in 
exclaiming, " A great man has fallen in Israel.'* The Rev Mr. Keith had just attailiieid the sixth 
year of his missionary labours in Calcutta, when the messenger of Jehovah announced the period of hu 
departure, and dropped the veil which separates the unseen world from that which we inhabit between 
him and us. During his short career he may be said, in conjunction with the Rev H. Townley, to have 
laid the foundation of a mission in the metropolis of India, not very inferior in importance mad magni- 
tude to any in the world. A Church had been formed, a congregation collected, and a spacioos house 
of worship, called Union Chapel, has been erected ; in the labour of which he bore, if not the principal, 
yet no inconsiderable portion. He shared the duties of the English services vrith the oo-psators of Union 
Chapel, and was occupied almost every evening in communicating instruction to the natives, and in pastor- 
al visits to the flock of which Grod had made him an overseer. He studied vrith commendable ^lersever- 
ance, the Bengalee and Hindoostanee languages, and composed various tracts, whidi he publisBH in each 
of them. He possessed so much dedsion of character, and perseverance in the plans which he formed, 
that seldom any difficulties diverted him from his object. It cannot, however, be imagined diat die 
deceased waji free from infirmities, and we recoUect that the Rev. H. Townlinr, when pa3fin^ the last 
tribute to his memory, before a numerous and affected audience, said, *' Were I to affirm oooceming mj 
departed brother that he was perfect whilst on earth, he himself, from the excellent glory, would be the 
first to confront me with the words of the Apostle, ' If we say we have no sin we deeeiTe onrsehrc*, 
and the truth is not in us.' But we desire not to discry those spots of imperfection whidi are lost in 
the splendour of his disinterested benevolence and truly philanthrophic exertions, tArhic^ he becaae 
a myrtyr. 

T^e following is the Itucription to his memory placed in the Union Chapei :--^ 

In Memory of the Rev. Jamea Keith. 
Joint-Pastor of the Church of Christ assembling in this place, and Alissionary to the Heathen. 
This Tablet, as an expression of regard and grateful remembrance, is by the 

Members of the Church erected. 

He departed this life 8th October 1822, aged 38 years. 

** They that turn many to righteousness shall shine as the stars for ever and ever." 



REVEREND R. DeRODT.— Ira/« Mienonary qfthe London Minionury Society. 

Mr. deXiodt was bom in Switzerland, February 2d, 1814. He received a classical edacation in the 
College at Berne, where he became acquainted with five or six students who were united together hj 
the bonds of Christian friendship. And it was undoubtedly in consequence of his piety, that when it 
became necessary for him to chose a profession, he resolved to devote himsdf to the ministry of die 
Gospel, and for that purpose he proceeded to Geneva to pursue the requisite studies. He there deter- 
mined on the Missionary work, and in 1835, visited England. He sailed from Liverpool in company 
with two other Missionaries, and arrived at Calcutta in 1836. He commenced his labours at Sona- 
mooky, but in 1838, returned to Calcutta. He delighted in itinerating labours, and made several 
extensive tours through various parts of Bengal and the adjacent Provinces. He was one of the most 
active members of the Missionary body in Calcutta, and from his youthful age and vigonr of conatita- 
tion, it was hoped from the commencement of his valuable labours, that he would prove of g ie alei use- 
fulness in future years. His course however was cut short, apparently through his seal for the good 
cause in which he laboured ; having set out on a visit to some schools in the Soonderbuna, he caught 
the jungly fever, which terminated his life in a few days. His remains were interred in the Scotch 
Burial Ground of Calcutta ; a Marble Tablet is erected in the Union Chapel with the fc^owing Inscrip- 
tion :— 

In Memory of the Rev. Rodolph de Rodt, 

A Missionary of the London Missionary Society. 

This Tablet is erected by his attached friends of different denominations. 

He was a faithful servant of Christ ; humble, frank, peaceable and laborious ; endowed with many talents, 

natural and acquired, which he devoted to the one great object of promoting the glory of his Master, 

by making known his blessed Gospel among the Natives of this Heathen land. 

He was bom at Berne, February 2, 1814; landed in India April 11. 1836, 

And slept io Jesus August 29, 1843. 

" He was a good roan, and full of the Holy Ghost and of faith."— Acts, zi.24 r. 



ST. ANDREWS KIRK. 

Sacred to the Memory of Oharlotta, 

Wife of James Forlong. Esq. 

Died at Mulnauth, 13th March. 1844, in the 24th year of her age. 

This Tablet is erected by a few friends by whom she was greatly esteemed and beloved while she Kvad, 

on account of her rare sweetness of disposition and excellence of character, aad who bow 

mourn her early death. 

** Favor is deceitful and beauty is vain, but a woman that feareth the Lord she shall be 

Pro v. xxxi. c. 30 v. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



69 



In Memory of Colonel l^Uiam Dunlopi 

Quarter-Master General of the H. E. I. Company's Ben^ral Army. 

Born March 16, 1785, at Wbitmuirhali, Parish of Selkirk, county of Roxburgh ; 

Died November 5» 1841, at Allahabad, 

In progress to Simlah with the Commander-in-Chief. 

This Tablet has been erected by a few of liiH friends in testimony of the affectionate regard with which they 

cherish the remembrance of his amiable qualities, genuine kindliness and solid worth. 

** There is no discharge in that war." — Eccles. viii. c. 8. v. 

" Prepare to meet thy God."— Amos, iv. c. 12. v. 

To the Memory of James Brown. D. D. 

Junior Minister of this Church. 

Born at Annan, Dumfrieshirc, 1786; 

Began his ministry in this place April 1823; 

Died off Malacca 2.3rd September 1830. 

A man of genuine truth and benevolence, and of unwearied zeal in the cause of religion. 

'* I have not hid thy righteousn^s within my heart ; I have declared thy faithfulness and thy salvation ; I 
have not concealed thy loving kindness and thy truth from the great congregation. "~Ps. xl. vcr. 10. 

In Memory of Donald Macleod, M. D. 

Inspector-General of H. M. Hospitals in India. 
This Tablet has been erected by a few of his personal friends, to record their sense of hb worth as a man 

and of nis merits as an officer. 

Bom at Bernisdale, InvemesS'Shire. 

Died at Calcutta 12th November 1840. 

*' He that is our God is the God of salvation, and unto God the Lord belong the issues of death."— Ps. Ixviii.20. 

Jan&es 8h«Wy Esq. a Judge of the Suddcr Dewanny and Nizamut Adawlut of this Presidency ; 

Died at sea, August 3l8t, 1842. Mi : 42. 
T\m stone is placed here in token of esteem and efTectionate regard by bis friends in the Civil Service. 

" To the Memory of the just is blessed.^—Prov. x. 7. 

Sacred to the Memory of Alexander GKurden, Esq. M. D."~Pre^ency Surgeon, 
who after a course of professional exertion marked by great kindness, assiduity and skill, departed 

this life the fifty -first year of his age. 

Bom at Aberdeen, October 4th 1794 ; Died at Calcutta April 24th, 1845. 

His Friends have raised this Tablet in testimony of affection and respect. 

" Be ye therefore ready also : for the Son of man cometh at an hour when ye think nut."— Luke xii. 4a 



THE SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 

This Ground was opened on August the 25th, 1767, for the remaina of Mr. John Wood, a writer in 
the Council House, whose tomb was levelled to make way for the western cross road. The oldest 
Monument that now bears an Inscription is that 



In Memory of 
Mrs. Sarah Pearson, 

Ob. 8th of September, 1768. i£t: 19. 

In Memory of 
Mrs. Oatlierine Sjkea, 

wife of Francis Sykes, £sq. 

who died the 28th of December 1768, 

In the 25th year of her age. 

Joined to a life of virtue must 

ever make her husband and 

her children feel, and her 

friends, lament her loss. 



In Memory of Mrs. Alice l^alter, 

who died December 10th. 1769. 

Lamented by her husband and all her friends. 

In Memory of Xmcia, 

wife of Robert Palk, Esq. 

Daughter of the Rev. Dr. Ston house ; 

Born at Northampton 26th November 1747, 

deceased June 22nd 1772. 

What needs the emblem ; what the plaintive strain ; 

What all the art that Sculpture e'er expressed. 

To tell the treasure that these walls contain. 

Let those declare it most who knew it best ; 

The tender pity she would oft betray 

Shall be with interest at her shrine returned ; 

Connubial love, connubial tears repay, 

And Lucia lov*d shall still be Lucia mourn M ! 

I'ho' grief will weep and friendship heave the sigh ; 



Tho' wounded memory the fond tear shall shed ; 

Yet let not fruitless sorrow dim the eye 

To teach the liviniTi (iie the sacred dead 

Tho' clos'd the lips tho* stopped the tuneful breath. 

The silent clay cold monitress shall teach. 

In all th' alarming eloquence of death. 

With double pathos to the heart shall preach. 

Shall tell the virtuous maid, the faithful wife 

If young and fair, that young and fair was site. 

Then close the useful lesson of her life 

And tell them what she is they soon must be. 



In Memory of Mrs. ^ , 

who departed this life the 3rd ^ptember 1773, 
in the 2drd year of her age. 

In Memory of 
Mrs. Marf^. lUckaon, 

wife of Captain Thomas Dickson, 

and daughter to Mr. James Baillie, 

who died the 30th Sept. 1774, 

in the 25lh year of her age. 

Sacred to conjugal affection 

this Monument was erected by 

her disconsolate husband. 

Her virtuous conduct and tender affection 

as a wife are proofs of what she would 

have been as a parent had it pleased 

Providence to spare her. 

This mouldering Tomb may 

for a while preserve her name, but the 

memory of her virtues live in the hearts 

of her friends. 



70 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROCND. 



To the M 
died the 



of Mn. 

Nov. 1774. aged 22 yemw. 



To the MefDory of 
Lieutentnt-Colonel JaiB«s 1^—^ ■■■ ■ ■ , 

Chief EogiDcer in the CompAoy's Service 

at Bengal ; 

who died the 23rd day of December 1774, 

aged 42 years. 



Here lieth the body of 

Tjr»o Said Haaeoek. E«|. 

who died 6th Nov. 1776, aged 64 yean. 



aft Calratca. 
'ttrved ibe Hoa. E. I. C a M paay 
iatbetfoaMeawidk 
Svrajaba'l-Daanab aad Coani Ally Cawa. 
Departed th « bfc the ITlh Nf€»liar, 1777 

"" byallwboki 
■ir«a46. 
Hia widow, asa aMrli of 
ber aibftioa aad fratttade, 

to 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Joaepli I»aw, 

a writer in the Honorable Company'! Service ; 

who died lincerely regretted by hi» friends, 

on the llth day of February 1776. 



•HereUeth 
<;^harlaa Sdmaa. 

who was bom in Gothenoarg, 

in the kingdom of Sweden. 

He was the son of 

the Rev. Dean John Edman, 

and departed this life on the 20th of March 1776, 

at Calcutu, in the kingdom of Bengal. 

'J'his Monument was erected 

by his disconsolate widow, Aara de Barroa. 



Here lies entered the remains of 
Slaanor IVaftaon, 
bom the 6th of May 1761 , 
and died the 19th of October 1776 ; 
and also of 
Samnel IVataon, her son, 
bora llth of October and died the 26th. 
Here also lyeth the body of 
Mrs. Marj Ohapman, 
who departed this life on the 23d of January 
in the year of our Lord 1784, aged 63 years. 
Universally lamented by all 
that knew her, 
being a pattern of Virtue, Piety, 
Charity and Friendship. 

No empty form of words are here expressed. 
But simple truth as it 's by nature dressed. 



To tke .M( 




Sob of CupL Joha 
died the 3d of Jaae 1779. aged 2| 



Theremaiasof 
BiJ^ia. Eao. 
of the CHy of Carlisle. Camberiand. 
who died the 9d day of Jaaaaryp 1779, 
aie bcia depoanbd, 
aged 40 yean. 
Tbis MoeoBcat waa erected to 
perpetuate the mcaiory of a aaeere friend 
and honest nuui by ius survivioflr friends, 
as a teitioiooy of tbeir regard far nil 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Ohartea fltaflbrd Flaydill, £m|. 

Member of the Boaid of Tra<le ; 

Master in Chaneer^ and 

Superiotendant of Police in Calcutta, 

who departed this life on the 29th of May 1779 

Sincerely and anivenally ragvettisd 

by Europeans and Nadvea. 



This Tomb waa erected 

by Lieut. W'dliam Fonter, 

in Memory of his brother. 

Ensign JTa. Forater^ 

who died the aOth of Aogast 1779. 

Aged 26 years. 

Also his only son 

^rad. Stocklty F o raU av 

who was bom the 2Sid of July. 1776. 

and died the 16th of July, 1780. 



To the Memory of 
Capt. David flaatth» 

2nd Brigade. 
Obt 15th Sept. 1779. iEtatia 32 



Here lies the body of 

Thomas Priea. Esq. 

who departed this life the llth November 1776. 



To the Memory of 
Mr. Robert Brown, 

who departed this life 
the 10th day of December 1776, 
in the 36th year of his age. 
And what is friendship but a name ; 
A charm that lulls to sleep ; 
A shade that follows wealth or fame, 
But leaves the wretch to weep. 



To the Memory of 

Sir John ClaTminr, 

Knight of the Most Honorable Order of the Bath, 

l>ut.(ienl. in his Britannic Majesty's Service ; 

and Colonel of the 52d Regiment of Foot, 

second in the Supreme Council of 

Fort William in Bengrtl. 

and Commander-in Chief of 

all the Company's forces in India. 

Died August 30th. 1777, 

iu tlte 66tn year of his age , 

and was interred here. 



To the Memory of 

OeorseBnrsk, Eaq. 

who died Febraary 24th 1780. aged 38 years. 

Much lamented by all his friends. 



To the Memory of 
SUaabathi 

Wife of Capt. Bei^amm Wroe ^ 
a lady endowed with every social virtue ; 
departed this life March 10th, 1780, 
aged 27 years. 



To the Memory of 
Lieut.-Col. Benjamin IVUdmi^, 
Obiit 30th of August, 1780, ii::tatis 46 years. 



To the Memory of 
Charles Pipon, Esq. 
who died Septt;mber 16th, 1780, aged 32 years. 

In Memory of 
Mtarjr BowarSy 

who died the 4th of March 1781, 
lu the 65th year of her age. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



71 



In sincere attachment 

to the Memory ol 
Mr. Oeorge Bo|^le, 

lute Ambasnador to Tibet » 
who died the 3d of April 1781. 

This Monument is erected 

by his most aflfectionate friends 

David Anderson and Claud Alexander. 



Miss R«b. Vang^han, 

died 4lli of August 1781, aged 8 years. 



In Memory of 
Thomas Pearson, E^q. 
Ob. 5ih of August 1781, Al,u 42. 



In Memory of 
Lieut. Xaewis Mordannt, 

who departed this life 19th of September 1781, 
in the 22nd year of his age. 



In Memory of 
Captain Alphin MeOrerOTy 

Ob. 25ih of August 1781, ALU 34 years. 



In Memory of 
Mrs. Marj IIardiii(ri 

died October the 3d, 1781, aged dO years. 

In Me mory of 
Mr. l^m. lyinikins. 

Commander of Stores ; 
died 25th of November 1781, aged 33 years, 
much regretted by his friends. 
He was an affectionate husband, 
fond parent and warm friend. 
Also Miss Blisab«th IVIHlkiiis, 
died 23d Jan. 1779 ; 
Aog^osta Ann UVUkSns, died 16th August, 
1781, aged 9 days. 
Master H. "W. 'WUkins, 
died October the 4th, 1781, 
aged 19 months and 13 days, 
being three of his children. 



In Memory of 
Anne Oluunbers, 

who died 7th February 1782, a|[ed 69 years, 

aud of two of her grand children, 

Henrietta Ghan&bers. 

who died 30th of July 1779 aged 4 months. 

And Sdward Oolin CHbianibers, 

who died 9th November 1781, aged 6 months ; 

Being children of 

Sir Robert Chambers 

and Frances his wife. 

Also in Memory of 

Jane Marriot, 

an infant about 18 mouths old, 

who died 23d November 1781. 



In Memory of 
Lieut. John Sl^vrood, 

of the 1st brigade ; 
Obiit. 1st of March 1782, i£t.*26. 



In Memory of 
Miss Marj Ann &— «., 

born ye 11th of Apnl 1788. 

and departed this life 

the 28ih of May in the same year. 

^-^^■^— ii"^ 

Sacred to the Memory of 
the Rev. Thomas Yates, 
many yean chaplain to this Presidency, 
who died on the 14th of April 1782. 
His amiable and chearful disposition 
procured him the esteem and friendship 
of the public in general 
and bis many private virtues 

will ever be remembered 
by those of his more intimate 
acquaintance, who in his death 
lamented the loss of an honest man. 



In Memory of 
Capt. IXmiiam Swallow, 

who died the 25ih of April MDCCLXXXII, 
aged LlX ^ears, 
and lies here mterrtd. 



In Memory of 
Captain John Ohrant, 

who died 28th April 1782, aged 32 years. 
The sweet companion and the frieml sincere 
Need no Mechanic help to force the tear ; 
In heartfelt numbers never want to shine 
'Twill flow eternal o'or a hearse like thine. 



To the Memory of 
Thomas Fitsnuinrice Ohan&hers, 

son of Sir Robert and Lady Chambers, 
bom on the 28th Oct. MDCCLXX VI. 
who was shipwrecked in the *' Grosvenor" and 
perished on the coast of Africa in August 1782. 



Mr. l^VUliam Chambers, Prothonotary 

and Persian Interpreter to the Supreme 

Court of Judicature in Bengal : by 

whose death the interests ot 

true religion in India and the 

concerns of the Calcutta Mission in 

particular experienced a considerable losd. 

He died on the 22nd August 1793, 

and was interred in the above 

Tomb of hit family. 



Here lyeth the body of 
Mr. John Bonlton, 

who departed tliis life 
the 31st day of July 1782, aged 42 years, 
much regretted by all his acquaintance. 

In Memory of 
Lieut.-Col. Alexander Hannay, 

died the 4th of September 1782, aged 40 yean. 

Here lies the body of 
James Kerr, 

Surgeon in the service of Uie Blast India 

Company upon the Bengal Establisliment, 

and distinguished as well by his Medical 

knowledge as by his improving the arts 

and enriching science by his 

discoveries in India ; 

he departed this life on the 

17th September 1782, i£t 44 years. 

And under this Monument is also 

interred his infant son. born on the 

3(Hh September 1782, and who only survived to 

the 5th of October of the same year. 

In Memory of 
Mr. Archibald Crawford, 

died the 3rd of November 1782, i£tat 36 years. 

In Memory of 
Captain DaTid Phillips, 

died the 7lh of November 1782, aged 64 years. 

To the Memory of 
Thomas Pownej, Esq. 

who departed this life 
the lOth November 1782, aged 61 years. 
Here lies the tendcrest husband, father, friend; 
His life with goodness roark'd with grief his end ; 
His mind was calm, oh may his soul have re»t 
And he who others bless'd himself be bless *d. 
He gave to every Christian virtue scope. 
And what his practice was, is now his hope. 



72 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



In Memory of 
Mm. Marj Barelay. 

died the 12th of November 1782, AiU 62 years. 

To the Memory of 

Alexander Btorjf 

who departed this life the 29th December 1782, 
aged 9 years and 3 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

HeorjVfFwltw, (infaot.) 

who died the 30th June 1783. aged 18 months, 

and also Sdward, his brother, who died 

the 3rd September 1783, aged 9 months. 

Here lieth the body of 
Charles Frederick Smith, M. D. 

Missionary of the Brethren's Church ; 

bom the llth September 1746. 
departed this life the 31st August 1783. 



Sacred to the Memory of an honest man, 
this humble stone records the name and fate, 
(the latter, alas ! how unequal to his worth) of 
Riehard Becher, Es^., 
late Member of the Board of Trade ; 
and once of the Council of this Presidency. 
Thro' a long life passed in the service 
of the Company, what his conduct was 
the annals of the Company will shew. 
On this ublet sorrowing friendship tells, 
that bavbg reached, in a modest independence, 
what be deemed the honorable reward 
of a Hfe of service to enjoy it ; 
he returned in the year 1774 to his native land, 
where private esteem and public confidence 
awaited, but where misfortune also overtook him. 
By nature, open, 
liberal and compassionate ; unpractised 
in gruile himself and not suspecting it 
in others, to prop the declining credit of a friend, 
he was led to put his all to hazard 
and fell the victim 
of his own benevolence ; 
after a short pause and agonizing conflict, 
bound by domestic claims to fresh exertions ; 

in 1781 
he returned to the scene of his earlier efforts, 
but the vigour of life was past, 
and seeing thro' the calamity of the times 
his prospects darken, in the hopeless 
efforts to re-erect the fortunes of his family, 
under the pang of disappointment. 



and the pn a m re ol the rlitnatff ; 

a worn buimI and debililaied body. 

sanklorML 

roernofr wisdoM otdaioed, 

that bis reward sbomid doI be of thia world. 

and nanoved bun to aa de raity of happtnetf , 

Kov. I7th, 1782; i£tai mmm 61. 



To the Memory of 
Mr.Ja»as !■• Ore 
ObL Sept. 22. 1783. jEl 34 Vears. 

At the instance of CapC Tboa. Larkins, 

and to the Memory of 

Thoasas Fojmtlncy Esq. 

Commander of the Ship ** Kesolation,** 

in the service of the United Company of 

Merchanu of England, tradiar to the East Iw 

who most bravely deCended 
the " Resolution" against thirty sail of the Mah 

fleeu 
He died esteemed and honored by thoae who I 

him. 
The 28th day of August 1783» a^ed 53 Year 

Here lyeth interred the body of 



who departed thia life the 22nd of March 17£ 
aged 41 Veark 

la Memory of 



who departed thia lira on the 
Ist of October 1783, aged 47 Years. 
This Monument a hopeless widow reara. 
To prove her love and to record her teara : 
Tis her's on lasting marble to attest, 
How good her husband was, herself how bles'd 
Yet for these virtues mercy will be shown ; 
What caused her happiness will cauae hia own. 



To the Memory of 
Mr. Farall l^ordsworthy 

who died the 17th Dec 1783, 
ag^ 23 Years. 

To the Memory of 

Mrs. Oharlotta Wickmr, 

Wife of Wm. Hickey, Esq., 

who died the 25th of December 1783, 

Aged 21 years. 10 months and 10 days, 

leaving a truly disconsolate husband, 

bitterly and inceaiantly to deplore the loss of he 



AUGUSTUS CLEVELAND ESa late qfihe Bengal CwU Service. 

His assiduity in discharging the laborious duties of his station, had so much impaired hia con 
tution. that he was under the necessity of trying a [sea voyage for the recovery of his health, but 
fortunately without success, as he expired a few days after his embarkation. The GoTemor Gen 
deeming the services performed by Mr. Cleveland, in cultivating and conciliating the minds of 
inhabitants of the districts under his charge of such importance to the peace of the country, 
security of the revenue, the credit of the English name, and the principles of humanity, sm to m 
a public and lasting commemoration of them — for the honor of his reputation and for an examplt 
others, directed a Monument to be erected to his memory at the public expense. The foUowmg 
scription is engraven on his Tomb, containing a short specification of those services :— 



Here lie the remains of 

Augtistua OloTdand, Esquire, 

late Collector of the llevenues ; 

Judge of the Dewanny Adawlut of the 

Districts of Bhaugulpore, Monghyr, Rajmahal, 

&& &C. 

He departed this life 12th January 1784, at sea 

onboara the *' Atlas" Indiaman, Captain Cooper. 

proceeding to the Cape for the recovery of his healtn, 

aged 29 Years. 
His remains, preserved in spirits, were brought 
up to town in the Pilot sloop which attended the 

•• Alias/' 



and interred here on the 30th of the same mont 
The public and private virtues of this excellei 
young man, were singularly eminent 
in his public capacity ; 
he accomplished by a system of conciliation 
what could never be effected by Military coerci 
he civilized a savage race of the mountaineers 
who for ages had existed in a state of barbarisi 
and eluded every exertion that had been practi: 
against them to suppress their depredations, 
and reduce them to obedience ; 
to his wise and beneficent conduct^ 
the English East India Company 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



73 



were in«lebled tor the subjuctingr to thtir Government, 

the oumerous inhabitants of that wild 

and extensive country, the Jungieterry. 

In his private station, 

by the aniiablencss of his deportment, 

the gentleness of his manners, 

and the ^^oodness and generosity of his heart, 

lie was universally admired, 

beiuved and respected by all 

who had the happiness of knowin^f him. 

(The principal Natives who had been sulyect to his 

control solicited permission to give some public lesti- 

moiiy of the sense they entertained of the beneficence 

uhicU he had invariably shewn towards them, by 

erecting also a Monument to his Memory , which was 

uccordinsly done, and the erpences of it were defray- 

£d by voluntary subscription on thier parts. J 

Wilhiii this Tomb reposeth the body of 

Doctor Rovrland JackBon, 

a Member of the Royal College 

of Physicians, of London ; 

who died sincerely lamented 

by his family and Iriends, 

on the 29ih of March 1784, agrcd 1)3 Years. 



Near this place, sleep in joyful 
hope of a resurrection, llic remains of 

Edward VITheler, Rsq., 

thin! sou of Sir William VVheler, Bart. 

oi' Leuniingrloii Hastings, in the county 

of Warwick, 

and of Dame Penelope, his wife ; 

daughter of Sir Stephen (ilyn, Hart. 

of Bicester in Oxfordshire, and of 

J)ame Sophia, his wife ; 

Daughter of Sir Kdward Evelyn 

of Long Ditton in Surry, Bart. 

He niarrit-d first 

Harriet Chichely Plowden, 

descended from the Plowdens, 

ol Plowden in Shropshire ; 

by whom he had no issue. 

Second, Charlotte, daughter of 

George Durnford, Esq. of Winchester, 

by uhum he had two daughters : 

Charlotte and Penelope, 

and left them both infants. 

Those who had the happiness of his 

friendship, saw human nature 

in its most amiable form ; 

lor he was a kiud aud tender husband, 

a fond and careful father, 

the wurm patron of those he protected 

and the friend of all mankind. 

In his political character, 

which will be best learned from 

the pngrs of history ; he was an 

upright, just, and honest man ; 

and as his disinterested conduct 

gained the esteem of all ranks of men ', 

so in their memory he is 

honored, beloved, lamented. 

In September his health began to decline, 

and after a few weeks' illness, 

he died on the lOtli of October, 

in the year of our Lord 1784, aged fifty -one. 



Sacred to the remains of 

Edward Stephensoiiy Esq. 

who died the 13th d:iy of July 1784, 

in the 45th year of his age. 
As a grateful tribute to his memory, 

This monument is erected by his 
afTcctionate wife, Sarah Stephenson. 



Here lies the body of 
Mrs. Martha Qoodlad, 

Who departed this life 
21st March 1785, aged twenty-three. 

If ever tears deservedly were shed. 
If ever grief was due to virtue dead, — 
To merit, Martha, and thy spotless ways. 
Claim tears from all, for all allow them praise ; 
Thy strength of mind we scarce shall meet again. 
Shewn through a long, most agonizing pain : 
1 hy warm affection as a wife or friend. 
Make all who know you weep your cruel end : 
Cruel, alas ! but this one thing we're sure, 
Those virtues that you held in life so pure 
Will be repaid ; this thought and that alone 
Your friends have left to mitigate their moan. 
That latest tribute a kind husband gives. 
Whose heart is torn, is wretched while he lives. 
And only prays one day to re^ich that shore 
I'o meet his Martha and to part no more. 



To the Memory of 
James Robert IVadeson, 

Aged 27 years ; 
died the Uth April 1785. 



Sacred 

to the memory of the l>est of Mothers ; 

Elisabeth Crisp, widow , 

Who alter enduring with heroic constancy 

one of the severest Chirurgical operations, 

died on the 30th of April 1785, 

the patient martyr ot a cruel 

aud unrelenting malady. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Burriah Orisp, Ksquire, 

a Senior Merchant in the service of 

the East India Company : 

and first member of the Board of Revenue : 

who departed this life on the 

26th day of April 1811, aged 47 years. 

He arrived in this country when a child, 

and was therefore deprived 

of the advantages of an education in £urope, 

but by the tender care of an excellent mother, 

(whose remains are interred near this spot) 

and by the powers of his own mind, he attained 

the highest oHiees under the Government ; 

which he tilled with zeal, ability, and honors 

whilst his private life was eminently 

distinguished by benevolence, piety 

and every social virtue. 



CHARLES SHORT, ESQ. 

The integrity and uprightness of his conduct, in the transaction of the extensive Mercantile concerns 
in which he had been engaged through the course of a twenty years' residence in India ; had stamped 
a general degree of resi)ect on his character at Calcutta, and added to the esteem which all his acquaint- 
ance entertained for him, is the amplest testimony of his loss to society, but that which his more 
intimate friends have sustained by his death, can only he known by those who had frequent opportunities 
of viewing his conduct in domestic and private life, in which situations it was strongly marked by every 
qualiheation that could constitute the character of a benevolent man, and an affectionate friend, lie 
died at Russapnglah in Calcutta. 

h 



74 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



The following Itueription i$ taken from hie 
Monument : — 

Here lie the remains of 

Oharles Short, Esq. 

who, in the vigour of lite, 

and universally regretted, 

exchanged his earthly for an heavenly abode, 

on the 2d day of July 1785. 



To the Memory of 
Mrs. Bleanor 'WiUianuson, 

who died the 28th July 1785, i£i. 45. 

This monument is erected by her 

disconsolate consort, George Williamson. 

A better woman never lived ; a beiiei* never died. 



H. DaTiesi 

aged 4 years, 
died the 4th of Sept. 1785. 

Sleanora Honycomb, 

Ob. 15th of October, A. D. 1785, 

aged 7 months. 

" Suflfer little children to rome unto me 

and forbid them not."— Luke 18th v. 16. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Phoebe Jackaon, 

late wife of Lieut. Edward Rowland Jackson, 
who died the 20th November 1785, aged 24 years. 

And ye who now with pensive thoughts peruse 
The sad effusions of a mournful muse. 
Yet mark though beauty gives thee every grace, 
And youth's warm blood still flushes in your face. 
Perhaps o'er you death holds hi» iron rod. 
And uuprepar'd demands thee from thy God. 

The remains of her Father-in-law, 
l^octor ZUrs^land Jackaon, 

are deposited near this place. 



Here lieth the body of 

Jamea Arthur, Surgeon, 

who departed this life the 

22d of May 1786, aged 49 years. 



In Memory of 
Mrs. Marj Hennaa, 

who died the llth of June 1786, aged 32 years. 

He re He the remains of 

Mr. "^Iirmiam IVatta. 

Pilot in the Honorable Company's Service, 

who died the 28th of July 1786, aged 34 years. 

Much regretted by all who knew him. 



In Memory of 

Mrs. MackcliuT, 

the beloved wife of John Mack clary, 

died 8th September, 1786, aged 26. 



In Memory of 

Ensign Iiuke IVellea, 

who died the llth day of Sept. 1786, 

aged 36 years. 
Much regretted by all who knew him. 



Here lieth interred the body of 

Henry Vanaittart, Esq. 

who departed this life the 7th October 1786, 

in the 32d year of his age. 



Sacred to the Mem ory of 

Captain Jamea IfffilUamsoBy 

who departed this life on tlie 

2d of December MDCCLXXXVl. aiM 44 ycai 

and of Abraham Roebuck, Esq. 

who died the 12th of May 1788, 

aged XXXIV. years. 



Edmnnd Ben^ 

died 10th Jan. 178 



)7, aged 



, M. D. 
55 years. 



Here lieth the remains of 

Mr. Allan Stewart, 

who died the 5th of February 1787, 

aged 39 years, 

much regretted by all who knew him. 



In Memory of 
Mr. Joa. Sheimerd, Engraver, 
who departed this life the 27th of March 1787, 
aged 34 years. 



Janet Balfbnr, 

She was bom on the 4th November 1783, 
and died on the llth of April 1787. 



Here lieth the remains of 
Marraret AuchterlonsTy 

who died of the smalUpoz on the 
2l8t of April 1787, in her 14th year. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Marj Joys, 

who departed this life the 

first day of May M DCCLXXX VII. 

aged 28 years 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Rohert Gkurdener, 

who was unfortunately wrecked 

in the Ship Ganges on the 

Barabullor Sand in the Kiver Ganges, the 

23rd May 1787, 

in the 47th year of his age. 

This Monument is erected 

from a motive of filial regard 

by his affectionate son, Andrew Gardener. 



Here lies interred the remains of 
J. It. Oonyera, 
bom May 29th 1751, died May SOth 1787, 
aged 36 years. 
This Monument is erected by his son, J. D. Conyc 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Benjamin GHhbona, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 

30th day of May, in the year 

of our Lord Christ 1787, aged 40 years. 



In Memory of 
Mrs. Roaetta Meridith, 

wife of Mr. Thomas Meridith ; 
who departed this life the 1st of October 1787, 
aged 30 years. 



Mr. Duncan Man, 

died 10th October 1787, aged 32 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



75 



Erected by Ualdane Stuart, 

to the Memory of hU brother, 

Duncan Stuart, 

who died the 25th of October 1787, 

a^ed 17 years aiid 9 months. 



In Memory of 

Thomas Henry Bourke, Taylor ^ 

who departed this life 

the 8th of November 1787, aged 39 years. 

He was bom at Castlebar, 

in the county of Mayo in Ireland, 

on the 19th of Dec. 1748. 



Here lieth the body of 

Mi-s. H. Broadbrook, 

who died the 4th January 1 788, aged 35 years. 



Mr. 'WiUiam Bonfield, 
died 12th January 1788, aged 41 years. 



In Memory of 
Mrs. Marj Sn&yth, 

nrho departed this life the 3rd of September 1788, 
in the 33rd year of her age. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
IVaacis Xa'Herondellj 

who died 22nd of May 1788, aged 37 years. 



Here lie the remains of 
Mr. James Orrok, 

Assistant Surgeon ; 
who departed this life sincerely 

regretted by all his friends, 
June 25th 1788, aged 30 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Major Cornelius DaTis, 

died the 9th July 1788, aged 47 yean. 



In Memory of 

PkiUip Delisle, Esq. 

who died 15th July 1788, aged 46 years. 



Cliarlotte Deare, 

died 20th April 1788, aged 3 months 23 days. 



Juxta Cineres Filii lacobi, 

Maria KeifrUy. 

Uxor et Delicise Jacobi Inglish Keighly, 

Armiger ; in expectatione Diei Supremae 

Hie Jacet. Qualis erat. 

lata Dies Indicabit Obiit 11th Nov. 

Anno Dom. 1787, iEtatis suae 32. 



Sacred to the Memory of the 
Hon. Xaockkart Oordon, 

youngest son of John, Earl of Aboyne. 

Judge Advocate of Bengal, and Junior 

Counsel of the Hon. East India Company. 

He was bom 1732. 

In 1770, he married Catherine, 

daughter to John Wallop, 

Viscount Lymington ; 

by whom he had seven children. 

His mind was great, his knowledge 

and talents eminent, his form beautiful ; 

he joined fortitude to the most 

exquisite sensibility ; and was an affectionate 

husband, a fond father, a zealous friend. 

He died at Calcutta March 24th, 1788, 

sincerely regretted. 



Mr. Joseph Brown, 

died the 28th of April 1788, aged 34 years. 



Here lieth interred the body of 

John Peiarce, Esq. 

who served the Hon. United Company 

with honor and fidelity : 

departed this life on the 20th of May 1788, 

In the 49th year of his age ; 

truly lamented as a sincere friend, 

affectionate brother, and parent 

to the indigent, to whose Memory 

a Monument is erected at Midnapore. 

K 2 



Sacred to th e Mem ory of 
Mrs. Mary mniliams, 

wife of Capt. John Williams ; 
died 23d July 1788, aged 43 years. 



To the Memory of 

Charles Oromnielin, Junr. Eoq. 

Obt. 17th Oct. Anno Domini 1788, iEtat 30. 



To the Memory of 
Miss M. S. Bristow, 

who died the 17th Dec. 1788, aged 7 months. 



An afflicted and disconsolate father, 

hath caused this Monument to be erected, 

to the Memory of his only son, 

IVarren Hastinpi Jjarkins ; 

who died the 20th August, 1788, 

aged 4 years and 20 days. 

An uncommon promising genius, and 

engaging and amiable disposition, made 

him the delight of his father and a favourite 

of the settlement ; in this season of innocence, 

the hand of providence visited him with 

a mortal disease, and removed him from the 

presence of his earthly parent, to the 

kingdom of his heavenly father and 

Redeemer. The dictates of reason and 

religion may teach us to acknowledge the 

benefits derived to him from the change \ 

but the lenient hand of time only can 

reconcile the feelings of paternal alfection, 

to the disappointments of hope, on which 

it had fondly rested, and which have 

been thus untimely destroyed. 



Thcbodvof 
Montagu Perrean, 

Son of R. S. and M. Perreau ; 
bom 25th Nov. 1787, died 25th Nov. 1788. 



To the Memory of 

Mr. Samuel Oldham, 

who died the 30th of Nov. 1788, 

aged 55 years. 



Js. Stormouth, 

died the 19th Dec. 1788, aged four years. 



76 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Pout vartos Caflus, varies |>oiit, R«lli Labon^s 

Hie prooul a Patria Indi propter Ripas 

SSdmondsoni Legioniii Pr<rfecti 

O^sa quicMnint 
Quem Rohilloruin Pnedatorae Manus 

Impia quem Aj^ina Hyderi, 
quem ludiae fasti Invictum Testantur 
Indomitums More Sola Negat 
Bellicae Virtutis praemii^ 
Gladio honorifice donatum Toluit. Anglia grata. 
* Atoribus ornate Castris Sodalitio Comid 
Huspitio largus Munificus 
Deni([ue bonus, omnibus Cams 
Visit ad i£tat. 44 Ann. 
Flebilis Obiit Jan. 31 A. D. 1789. 
O Quicunque Audes Moliri grandia, discc 
Edmondsoni instar Vivere, discc mori. 



Here resteth the remains of 

GbarloUe Xaoltie. 

The daughter of the Rev. John Loftie, A. M. 

Rector of Saint Dunstan's, Canterbury ; 

and one of the Chaplains of the 

Bengal Establishment. 

Obiit Ist of February 1789, aged 18 years. 

Also of his eldest daughter, 

MarjGurstin, 

who was for near twenty-two years 

the highly esteemed and well beloved wife of 

Major General John Garstin, 

Engineer and Surveyor General ; 

she departed this life aifter a long and 

painful illness which she bore 

with fortitude ^d resignation, 

on the 28th of July 1811, 

and only grieved her husband when she died. 

Aged 42 years, 

leaving issue seven childrrai to lament their loss. 

Uliese sisters were lovely and pleasant 

in their lives, and in their death they 

were not divided. 



himself by his abilities and unwraried 
attention to tlie duties of Vam station. 
and to the general interests of thoaie 
he commanded. As an individual he wai 
respected for the benevolence of his dispositi 
and for the warmth of his friendahip. 
He died on the 15th of June 1789, aged 47 yi 

In Memory of 

MIks Anne Mattha^prs, 

who died 30th of July MDCCLXXXIX. 

aged 2 years 6 months. 



Son of John and Elizabeth Mackenzie, 
bom 3d January 1788, died 13th April 1789. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. 'William IVilliams, 
who departed this life 
the 18th of April 1789, aged 39 years. 

Mr. O. Myers, 

died 4th June 1789, aged 43 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Thonias Deane Pearae, Esq. 

late Colonel in the service of the 

Hon. flast India Company. 

He was an officer in the Royal Artillery ; in 1757 

was present at the si^es of Guadaloupe, 

the Havannah, and Bellisle. 

In 1768, he came to India with the rank 

of Major in the Artillery, and in 17G9 

succeeded to the command of that Corps, 

which he retained till his death. 

He marched a detachment to join the 

army under Sir Eyre Coote, in the 

Camatic ; and served there during the 

war, and rotumed to Bengal in 1785, 

and for the last three years of his life 

he was senior Officer of the Bengal army. 

In his public capacity, he distinguished 

* Probably meant fur Moribus ornate Castas. 



IVilliam Fenny, 
died 7th September 1 789, ag^ 1 7 years. 

Mr. 8. Hewton, Free Mariner, 
died 16th September 1789, a^^ 31. 



Mrs. M. T. O. Oockerelly 

(The lady of Charles Cockerel!, and dang 
of Sir Charles William Blunt, Bart.) Aft« 
long and painful illnesa borne with the k 
exemplary resignation, Mrs. CockcrcU quitt« 
life, brief indeed in dnraticni, but unceasii 
employed in the benevolent exercise of e\-ery 
tuous endowment. On the following momin 
numerous company attended her remains to 
burying ground to witness the solemnity of 
interment and pay the mournful tribute to dep 
ed virtue. 

The following Inscription is taken from 
Monument : — 

Maria Trjphena Oaroli Oockerell, 
Uxor Ob. October 5, Anno. Dom. 1789. 

Beneath this stone are dep osited the remains 
Captain John White, 
late Commander of the Hon. Company's 
ship " Earl of Oxford," 
in which ser\'ioe he was 35 jreara ; 
he departed this life 10th October 1 789, 
in the 47tli year of his age ; — 
after a long and tedious illness 
which he bore with Christian fortitude. 
He lived respected and esteemed by all 
who knew him, and died universally 
lamented by his friends. 



Mr. Jos. •.»«•.»«», 
died 12th Oct. 1789, aged 29 years. 

Miss Mary Hitlierini^oi&y 

who died 22nd Oct. 1789, ag«l 16 years. 

In Memory of 
'WillUxn Coke Aatley. 

Son of Sir Edward Astley, Bart. 
who died the 4th of Nov. 1789, aged 21 years 
And lies here interred. 



Here lies a worthy family : 
Mrs. Mary Boyle, 
her father and mother, 
Mr Rickard Dean, 
Dcjiuty Master Attendant of Calcutta,died in 17! 
Mrs. Dean, died 20th July 1788, 
much regretted by all who knew her. 
Mrs. Boyle died 27th November 1789, aged 3 
A better woman or more loving wife never livt 
Tliis Monument is erected, 
as sacred to her Memory ; 
by her husband, Mr. Wm. lioyle. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



77 



To the Memory of 

Lieut. David Z^yce, 

who departed this lite 

on the 2Cth of February MDCCXC. 

aged 23 years. 



In grateful remembrance of 
Mrs. Ann Jones, 
The lady of W. T. Jonea, Attorney at Law ; 
who died the 3rd of January 1790, aged 29. 
rho' low in earth your virtuous form liecayed, 
Vly faithful wife, my loved Nancy *s laid. 
In ('haiitity you kept a husband's heart, 
Co all but him, as cold as now thou art. 
To name your virtues, ill befits his grief, 
^Vliat was his bliss, can now give no relief, 
^'our husband mourns, the rest let friendship tell : 
Fame spread your worth, — your husband knew it 
well. 



In Memory of 
Cflpt. Thomas Oladwin, 

who departed this life on the 28th of 

February 1790, aged 38 years. 

And also to the memory of his infant nephew, 

Thomas Gladwin, 
who died 28th of August 1780, aged 3 years. 



In Memoir of 
Mr. O^eori^ Lewis, 

late Assistant Surgeon on this Establishment ; 
who departed this life the 
17th of March MDCCXC. aged 39 years. 



Mr. Herbert IVilliam Ord, 

died the 9th of January 179G, aged 34 years. 

Mm Martha Jane Ord, 

died 9th January 1796, aged 34 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

John, 

son of John and Mary Lynham, 

died 30th of May 1790, aged 5 months. 



Master Stephen Matthews, 

died the 24th of December MDCCXC. 
aged 18 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Xancy Gardener, 

wife of Conductor Daniel Gardener, 

who departed this life the 28th July 1790, 

aged 38 years. 



Here rest the remains of 
Mrs. Catherine Deare, 
who died at Calcutta the 6th of Sept. 1790, 
aged XXXIV. years. 
In Memory of her and of her husband, 
Lieut.- Col. Charles Russel Deare, 
who fell by a cannon shot, 
on the 13th of the same month ; 
while commanding the Bengal Artillery, 
in the action fought between a 
detachment of the British forces 
and those of Tippo Sultan, 
near Sattimungulum. 
aged XL. years. 



Tliis Monument was erecrted by their brother. 
Col. iieonsf. Deare, 

(TAe remains of Col. Deare were interred not 
far from the ground whereon hefell^ and they 
were alike vnconncious of each other'* fate, A 
tree grows near his grave^ on the bark of which, 
his soldiers, as the only testimonial of respect and 
ajfection that the time and circumstances of war 
allowed them, engraved his name.) 

To the Memory of 
Thonias Payne, Ksiq. 
First Lieut, of His Majesty's Ship ** Phoenix,'' 
who died the 13th of September 1790, 

aged 25 years. 

In gratitude to whose memory, and as a 

small testimony of their unalterable atfection, 

this Monument is erected by desire of his 

faithful shipmates, who sincerely lament 

the loss of their departed friend. 

Mr. Thomas Fowler Tnmer, 

late chief Officer of the " Rodney" East Indiamaii, 

died the 5th September 1790, aged XXV. years. 

Truly lamented by all who knew him. 



Here lyeth the*body of 
John Bntler Iiang-ley. 

who departed this life the 1st of October 1790, 
aged 30 years. 

Here lie the bodies of 

Iionisa Ann Macan, 

who died the 28th October 1790, aged seven days. 

Thon&as Macan, 

who died the Uth of September 1792, 

aged nine days. 

A nd Xaousia Macan, 

who died the 3d of January 1794, 

aged two months and eleven days. 

The infant children of 

Turner, and F. L. A. Macan, of Calcutta. 



In Memory of 

Thomas Ijeg^l^y Rsq. 

who departed this life the 17 th of Nov. 1790, 

aged 44 years. 

Also to the Memory of 
Anna Helena Iieg^h, 

who was killed by lightning 
the 27th of May 1788, aged 11 years, 

Charles Pnrlinr. Esq. 

late senior Merchant in uke senrice of 

the Honorable E. India Company, 

Obt. January 31, 1791, Mt, 44. 



Mr. John Swift. Mariner, 
departed tliis life 26th April 1791, Mt, 70 ye^rs. 
An old inhabitant of Calcutta, and near 
50 years a resident in India. 
Happy is he, tiie only happy man. 
Who out of choice does idl tlie good he ran ; 
Who business loves, and others better makes. 
By prudent industry, and care he takes. 
God's blessing here he'll have, and man's esteem 
And when he dies, his works will follow him. 



Mr. Francis lie Oallais, 
died 22d August 1791, aged 54 years. 



78 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



To the Memory of 

IXrUliaiB IVordsworth, f:«q. 

late tienior Merchant in the service of 

the Honorable East India Company, 

who died on the 22nd of Au^iut 31DCCXC1. 

aged 30 year<. 

Saered to the Memory of 

Oeori^ Smith, Km). 

who departed thiri life 

on the 30th of Augunt MDCCXCI. 

In Memory of 
Francis Randall, Enq. 
who departed thiji life on the 
2d of Sept. 1791, aged 42 years. 

To the Memory of 
Robert Hewton, 

who departed thu life September 5th, 1791, 

aged 35 years. 

By nature form'd for every social part, 

Mild were his manners and sincere his heart. 

This Monument, the tribute of aiTection, 

was erected by a friend. 



to the Memory of 



Mr*. 

who departi*d tlu» life oa the 31 at of Slay 17 
Agrd XXVl. years and five mouths. 
Tu the Memory of her infant son, 
b.jm 21th March 1792, 
and died the lOtfa of April foUowing. 

Sarrr d to th e fifemorj of 
rapt. Jam— Wilklnsan, ot' Artillery. 
Obitt 16th Jane 1793, ^tatis mae 33. 



In Memory of 
Mrs. Aane Champion, 

who died on the 22nd of October MDCCXCI. 
aged 28 years. 



In Memory of 
Mr. Petar Berry, 

who departed this life the 
l-lth November 1791, aged 26 years. 

In Memory of 
Manreon, 

rho departed this life 15th Nov. 1791, Mi, 57. 

This Monument 

is erected to t he M emory of 

Mr. John "WlUianui, 

who dei>arted this life 

November the 30th, 1791, aged 21 years ; 

and of his infant niece, 

Slisabeth Horaley, 

who departed this life March the 3d, 1799, 

aged 18 months and 20 days. 



In Memory of 

Mr. Qarret Pearae, 

Deputy Commissary of Stores, 

who departed this life 28th Jan. 1792. 

A\m> Mn. Marj Pearae, his wife, 

deceased the 28th May 1795, aged 46 years. 

Both esteemed in their lives, and 
their death lamented by those who knew them. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Jhe Rev. John Chriatman Diemer. L. L. D. 

who died the 21st of February 1792, 

aged XLIV. years. 



Mnster Jamea IVintle, 

died the 4th of March 1792. 



Mr. Jamea Oilhert, 

departed tliiH life 16th May 1792, aged 41 years. 

Doniu.H Oratioiiis Gloria Miserere Confiteor. 



Mm. Mar7]>eare, 

died 19(h of May MDCC.XU. aged 30 years. 



Life how short; 
In Memory ot Hanry ^t 
son of \^'m. and Elixa Jorer, 
died July the 19th 1792, aged 4 mondis 8 d 

In Memory of 



Mr-. 

wife of Mr. Richard Robt. Hunter, 
who departed this life on the 7tfa of Octobc 

MDCCXCII. aged XXIX. years. 
Also of two of her children, who died infiu 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut John J. Briscoe, 
of the Bengal Artillery, 
who departed this life Novemhcn* 2d, 1792 
Aged XXVII. yean. 

In Memory of 
Mr.J. O. Ottarnoa. 
who died the 28th Nov. MDCCXCII. 
Aged 34 years. 

The remains of 
Jaaaea Ooamo Gk>rdoa, 
Nat. Aug. 13, 1756. Nup. Oct. 16, 1792, 
Obt. Dec. 31, 1792. 
This stone is erected by his 
dutiful andafflicted widow, Christiana Gordi 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. Jacoh Barley, 
CiUzen of New York, Ameri<», 
who died Jan. the 1st A. D. 1793, aged 37 ye 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Sarah Joys, 

who departed this Ufe the 

fifth of January MDCCXCIII. aged 29 year 

Anna Dorothea IXTuldeBBy 

died at Calcutta on the 8th of March 1793, 
aged 29 years, 8 months, 20 days. 

In Memory of 
Henry Patrick 'WUsona, Ksq. 

who departed this life on the 11th of May 17S 

aged 42 years. 

Few men have quitted the stage of life 

whose loss will be more sincerely regretted, 

by a circle of friends, 

as respectable as they were numerous. 

'* In manners gentle, and in temper mild ; 

In wit, a man, simplicity a child." 

Here lieth interred the body of 

Mrs. Blisaheth Bmca, 

who departed this life • 

on the 8th of June MDCCXCIII. 

aged 17 years, 1 month and 15 days. 

She left a husband and two infant sons to 

bewail their loss, the one aged 1 year and 9 

months, the other 4 days. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



79 



In Memory of the late 
M r. IKTUliam Wmiaxns, 

who died much respected by all who knew him, 
on the 15th of July MDCCXCIII. aged 39 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. John XaoiMris, 

who departed this life on the 

6th of Aug:ust 1793, aged XXIX. years. 

In Memory of 
Mrs. Marj Movret, 

w^ife of Mr. James Mowet, mate 

in the H. C. P. Service, 

Obt. 29 August 93, JEt, 17. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Miss Marg^aret Cliarlotte Jackson, 

who arrived in Calcutta 

on the 10th day of September in the year 1793, 

and whom it pleased Almighty God to release 

from a lung, lingering and painful illness, 

on the 19th of the same month ; 

at the age of 16 years and 9 months. 

This Monument is erected 
by her affectionate and afflicted father. 
Sleep soft in dust, await the Almighty's wiD, 
Then rise unchanged and be an Angel still. 

S. Iv. J. C H. I. 

M. C. Birch, 

Nat. 22, Mai« 1790, Obt. 10 Oct. 1793. 



Here lie interred the bodies of 

Robert Vdnj, and of Ann, his wife, 

who, on the 3d of January 1794, 

were overset in a boat, as they were crossing the 

river opposite to Calcutta, and perished. 

He aged 31, she aged 26 years. 

** Tliey were lovely and pleasant in their lives, and 

in their death they were not divided.'' 2 Saml. 1,23. 

«* Prisoners of hope."— Zach. 9, 12. 



To the Memory of 

Catherine, the beloved 

Wife of Mr. J. Bowers. 

Obitt. March 27th, 1794, aged 28 years. 

The beloved mother of nine children ; 

leaving a disconsolate husband and 

leven children ever to regret their loss. 



Saci'ed to the Memory of 
Anna Maria Pallinf^, 
who departed this life on the 
25th of AprU MDCCXCIV. aged 19 years. 
Few were her days, yet in ftilfilUng the relative 
duties of a daughter, wife, and mother, she gave 
ample indication how valuable her life would 
have been, had it pleased Heaven to have 
continued it. She lived 
Happy in the love and esteem of all who knew 
her virtue. And died 
When every hope ripening to reward them. 



SIR WILLIAM JONES, KNT.— (Ontf qfthe Judges qfthe Supreme Court qf Judicature in Bengal,) 

" Botli age and youth, promiscuous crowd the Tomb ; 
No mortal head can sliun tli' impending doom." — Horat. 

*' Sir l^illiam Jones was bom in A. D. 1746 at his father's residence in Wales ; he was son to the 
celebrated mathematician, William Jones, who was both the disciple and friend of Newton, under whose 
patronage he taught mathematics in London, and had the honor of instructing the late Earl of Hard- 
wicke in that science. 

** In 1782, Sir William Jones made the tour of France, after which he resided for a few months in 
Paris, where he was introduced at Court. The French Monarch was much pleased with his conversa- 
tion and made many inquires respecting some of the provinces he had travelled through, to all of which 
he answered him in the particular dialect of each province. After Sir William withdrew, the king turned 
about to one of his courtiers, saying, * he is a most extraordinary man ! He understands the language 
of my people better than I do myself!' * Yes, please your Majesty,' replied the courtier, * he is, 
indeed a more extraordinary man than you are aware of, for he understands almost every language in 
the world, but his own.' * Mon dieu !' exclaimed the King, ' then of what coimtry is he ?' * He is, 
please your Majesty, a Welshman !* 

" In April 1783, Sir William Jones married Miss Shipley, daughter of the late Bishop of St. Asaph, 
and sister to the Reverend W. D. Shipley, Dean of that Diocese. 

'* In the same year Sir William Jones had been appointed one of the Judges of the Supreme Court 
of Judicature in Bengal, and had embarked on board the * Crocodile' frigate. 

" Sir William Jones arrived at Calcutta about the beginning of October ; and, after having taken his 
seat on the bench of the Supreme Court, according to the usual forms, he lost no time in making 
public his plan for instituting a Society at Calcutta, for the purpose of inquiring into the history, arts, 
sciences and literature of Asia. The plan was embraced widi eagerness by those gentleman in Calcutta 
who were best qualified to estimate its advantages, and to contribute to its support ; and being 
patronized by Mr. Hastings, then Governor General, with that liberality with which he was wont to 
foster every literary undertaking, the Society was soon found. The President's chair was first offered 
to Mr. Hastings, but on his declining it, Sir William Jones was elected perpetual President; and he 
delivered his preliminary discourse in February 1784. 

*' He was now enabled to give ftill scope to the excursions of his mind, and to gpratify every wish of 
his heart. The wide and fruitful region of Asiatic learning vras open before him, and the high and 
independent situation which he filled, gave him a commanding prospect of it ; whilst he practised those 
laws which it was the pride of his life to cherish and revere, and administered to his fellow-creatures 
the pure maxims of justice and tnith. 

'* He had long ardently desired to study the Sanscrit language ; and this desire was considerably 
increased by the great progress which he found Mr. Wilkins had made in that ancient idiom, and still 
more by that gentleman's elegant translation of the Bhagavat Geeta. He therefore commenced his 
studies in the Sanscrit without delay, and in the course of three years made himself so completely 
master of it, that the most enlightened professors of the doctrines of Brahma * confessed/ says Lord 



80 SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 

Tcij^mouth, in his discourse on the death of his friend, * with i>ride, delight, and surprise tliat his 
knowledge of their sarred dialect was most critically correct and profound. And the Panditd who 
were in the habit of attending him, when 1 saw them after bis death, at a public durbar, could neither 
suppress tlieir te^irs for liLs loss, nor find words to express their admiration at the wonderful progress 
which he had made in their sciences." 

*' The pertinacious and unwearied diligence with which he applied to his studies, deserves to be 
recorded. He made a regular distribution and allotment of his time. He rose at daybreak, and 
studied till breakfast time ; after which, during terms, he attended his duty in the Supreme Court, 
from whence he returned home at three o'clock, and studied till four ; he then went to dinner, where 
he generally had a select ])arty of friends assembled, whom he entertained with the utmost gaiety till 
seven ; when he returned to his literary labours, and did not again quit them till midnight ; this was 
his constant habit, from which he seldom or never deviated. No man enjoyed more than he did the 
delights of friendly intercourse, and the festive pleasures of society ; but all his pleasures were subservient 
to the paramount gratification he derived from the successful pursuit of the great end he had in view, 
that of ser^-ing his country, and instructing mankind ; for what Johnson says of Pope, may with 
strict truth be applied to him, * that he was one of those few whose labour is their pleasure.' 

" The most useful work in which he was ever engaged, and upon which, therefore, he was the most 
intent, de did not live to complete ; this was a copious digest of Hindu and Mahonmiedan law, compiled 
from Sanscrit and Arabic originals, a plan of which he had presented to Government, who had given 
it their most liberal patronage and strenuous support. The Pandits employed in the undertaking had 
concluded their part of it, and the Moluvees had nearly finished the portion which it was their business 
to supply, when the hand of death arrested the progress of the work and deprived society of a Jones. 

** Tliat the good and evil, the felicities and misfortunes of^human life are alike precarious, u a great 
and established truth, known and felt by the most untutored people. Every one knows that our lives, 
being at the Divine disjiosal, are not for a moment sure. The hand of death hangs over us in the joyous 
hours of hilarity ; threatens tlie tranquil pleasures of connubial happiness, and meets us with its pointed 
dart amidst the dignity of religious and philosophic retirement. Death shoots his stings from every 
side and is terrible to all. The rose of youth, and the grey hairs of age ; the blushing smiles of beanty, 
and the paleness of declining elegance ; the glittering magnificence of royalty, and the humble roof uf 
rural quietness ; the rudeness of unlettered barbarism and the polish of instructed genius ; must all 
yield to the inevitable blow. 

" When the social comforts of life thus dropt away, let us not, like Zeno, coldly refuse to pay our 
tribute to departed worth, but with all the warmth of Tibullus, speak the language of our hearts. 

** We have been led into these reflections by the death of that celebrated and illustrious man who 
has opened the long hidden mines of Oriental literature and displayed them to the European world 
with all the brilliancy of British eloquence, and who with all the amiable and endearing qualities of the 
heart, disdaining the lesser amusements of life, devoted his time to the service of his country, of science 
and of virtue. 

'* Possessing in all the habitudes of life a perennial spring of cheerfulness, and a conciliating 
gentleness of manners ; warmed by the sim])le greatness of moral affection, is there a heart so callous as 
not to feel his loss ? Is there a husband who knows tlie tenderness of love and the purity of domestic 
felicities ; is tliere a friend who glows with sincerity ; or is there a man who respects the divine attributes 
of virtue, wlio does not deplore it with the deepest regret ? Their breasts beat with unison of sorrow 
and with the calm manliness of silent grief, pay Uieir heartfelt tribute of affection to the memory of 
tlie brother of human kindness. 

" Virtues so transcendant, a heart so perfect and a mind so sound, form indeed a combination of 
private excellencies rare and admirable. 

** Religion, the source of every moral goodness, found in him a constant supporter and an obedient 
child ; moderate and magnanimous, he was ortliodox without bigotry and zealous without ostentation, 
with all the mildness of Chrbtianity he enjoyed its benefits and participated its enjoyments. 

** Surh endearing benignity, seldom e<|ualled, and not to be surpassed, added a lustre to the splendour 
of his i»ublic character, unparalleled even in the annals of literary record. 

** We contem])late both the private and public endowments of Sir William Jones with a corropondent 
and ])eculiar satisfaction. At home he was always good, and abroad he was always great. As a great 
man, whether we consider the perspicuity of his genius, the variety of his powers, or U^ extent of his 
erudition, we are alike enamonred and astonished. 

** Of his mental (|ualifications, at once so splendid and extraordinary, let us indulge in the enumera- 
tion. That promptitude of percqition which sees through systc^ms at a glance ; that brightneas of 
understanding which no paradoxical theorems can cloud ; that solidity of judgment which scepticism 
dares not approach, and above all that retention of memory which carries worlds on its wings, were 
possessed by him in all the amplitude of perfection. With such ))ro[)ertie8, a lively fancy corrected by an 
exquisite taste, formed his mind, while he was yet a boy, to the charms of poetry, which in his maturer 
years, ripened into eminence as a poetical critic. But his infant attachment ancl partiality to the velvet 
paths of muses, did not prevent him from penetrating with persevering assiduousness the thorny 
avenues of science. Asa lawyer he distinguisiied himself at an early age : and he not oidy attained a 
superior knowledge in the laws of his own country, but in those also of every other of the civilised 
giol)e. Without having travelled much, but with a perfect knowledge of the ancient tongues, he not 
only mastered all the ])oli.«hrd languages of EuroiK*, but also those of Asia. The Sanskrit, a language 
of whieh, till Mr. Wilkin's publication, little was known but the name, and the celebrity of those who 
speak it, he attempted, unassited by a Grammar, and conquered by that unwearied diligence to which 
all other studies yielded. His numerous and elegant translations, and particularly his last very great 
and curious production, ]>osterity will only need to know never to cease admiring. The present 
generation already knows bufhcicnl to render the commcuts of an humble essayist useless and unavailing. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUNt>. 



81 



The name of Sir William Jones stands alone a monument of greatness ; it commands the attention of 
surrounding nations, and extorts the praises of malignant criticism. It demands the gratitude of the 
ignorant, the commemoration of the learned, and the prayers of the pious. 

** Such were the virtues, such the acquirements of this mighty genius, who has at once illuminated 
the eastern and western hemispheres ; whose name resounds through both with the fondest exclamations 
of regard, and whose death was mourned from the throne to the cottage. 

" To attempt an illustrnion of Sir William Jones' character by contrasting his powers with those of 
other great men, is obviously unnecessary ; for where can a man be found either iu ancient or modem 
history of equal knowledge ; others have gone through the beaten tracks of science, and some have 
made roads of their own, but where can we find a man besides who has at once done both, and dug 
through the almost inaccessible precipices of Asiatic learning ! With him the world was blessed : with 
him his country was honored ; with him literature was graced, but the sacred arm of Omnipotence hath 
snatched him from us to a happier and more exalted place where he will receive the rewards of virtue." 

** As an excellent poet to whose translations we are indebted for many beautiful effusions of the Per- 
sian muse, was endowed by nature with a mind of extraordinary vigour. Sir William, by unwearied 
industry, aided by superior genius, successfully explored the hidden sources of Oriental science and 
literature, and his attainments in this interesting branch of learning were such as to place him far be- 
yond all competition the most eminent Oriental scholar in this or perhaps any other age. 

** In his public character, the labour he afforded in the despatch of business, the clearness of his 
discernment and his legal abilities, well qualified him for one of the guardians of the laws and the rights 
of his fellow-citizens. As a scholar his name is known wherever literature is cultivated. In private 
life he was companiable, mild, gentle, and amiable in his manners, and his conversation rich and ener- 
getic. In fine, in all the relations of public and private life he was revered and beloved. 

" Unlike many other eminent literary characters of the age, Sir William was a sincere and pious 
JChristian ; instead of labouring by his writings to propagate the doctrines of infidelity, as has been a 
favourite practice with some modem philosophers of reputation, he was desirous to lend the Scriptures 
his utmost support, and in one of his latest annual discourses to the Asiatic Society he has done more 
to give validi^ to the Mosaic History of the creation than the researches of any contemporary writers. 

** In April 1794, he was attacked with a bilious complaint, which after a few weeks proved so obstinate 
that it baffled the utmost skill of his physicians, and on Sunday morning the 27th of the same month, 
he died, agreeably to the uniform tenor of his life, a Patriot, a Philosopher, and a Christian." 

He was buried the day following with all the respect belonging to his rank, and what is more valua- 
ble, with all the honors due to his virtues. A bust of Sir William Jones in marble can be seen at the 
Asiatic Society's rooms. 

The following Inscription is taken from an Obelisk erected over his rem^uis and is one of the loftiest 
in the Ground : — 



Sir l^illiam Jones, Knt. 

died the 27tl^ April 1794, 

aged 47 years and 7 months. 



CThe above is on the north face of the Monu- 
ment : on the eastern face is thefuilowingr writ- 
ten by himself.) 

Here was deposited the mortal part of a man, 

who feared God, but not death, 

and maintained independence, 

but sought not riches ; who thought 

done below him but the base and unjust ; 

none above him but the wise and virtuous : 

who loved 
his parents, kindred, friends, and country, 
with an ardour 
which was the chief source of 
all his pleasures and all his pains : 
and who having devoted 
his life to their service, and to 
the improvement of his mind, resigned it calmly, 
giving glory to his Creator, 
wishing peace on earth, 
and with good will to all creatures. 
On the twenty-seventh day of April, 
In the year of our blessed Redeemer, 
One thousand seven hundred and ninety -four. 



Here lies the body of 
Mr. John Ch'egory, 

Late 3rd Officer of the Ship " Boddington," 

who died the 5th of May, MDCCXCI V. 

Aged 20 years. 



D. O. M. 

Beneath this Monument are deposited the remains 

ot l^illiam Oununing^, 
of the Honorable East India Company's Ser\'ice, 
who departed this life on the 11th day of October, 

A. D. 1794. 
To mark the spot of his interment, this 
Monument was erected and this Marble inscribed 
by his Nephew, George Cumming. 

In the Memory of 

Mr. Oleorre Zaeeberg:, 

who died the 27th October MDCCXCIV. 

Aged 32 years. 

In Memory of 
Petronella Adriana Andrew*, 

Bora the 28th of March 1753, 

Departed this life the 11th of November 1794, 

Aged 40 years, 7 months and 14 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Anne liedlie, 

the wife of William Ledlie, who died at Calcutta 

the 25th day of December 1794, 

Aged 26 years. Also of 

Thomas and Anna Slisa Zaedlie, 

her son and daughter, w^ho both died infants. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Francis Sniyth, Junr. £sq. 

late Sub- Accountant General, 

who died on the 3rd of April 1795, 

Aged 27 years. 

To tell his virtues and usef\il 

attainments here would be a vain task. 



%f 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sac red to the Memory of 
Mr. IXmUam Howard, 

who departed this life on the 
18th of August 1795, aged 46 yean. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Capt. "Wm. Oovmsell, 

who died the 24th of September 1795, 

aged 42 years, 4 months and 15 days, 

much regretted by all who knew him. 

Erected by his dutiful daughter, Maria Perry. 

To the Memory of 
Mrs. Juliana Orommelin, 

wife of C. R. Crommelin, 
who died 2nd November 1795, aged 25. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
a dutiful son and affectionate brother, 

Richard Peirce^ Esq. 

Eldest son of Captain Pierce, of the 

*' Halsewell,'' East Indiaman. 

His many amiable qualities endeared him 

to society, and his friends will long 

lament his early death. 

Obt. Nov. 19, Anno Dom. 1795, 

iEtatis 27 years. 

To the Memory of 

Cnptaio TUTilliam Haii:, 

of the ** Woodcote" Indiaman, 

who died the 27th day of November 1795, 

Aged 30 years. 

To the Memory of 
MfA. Ann Mead, 
who died the 4th Dec. 1795, aged 25 years. 

To the Memory of 

Miss BliaalMth Johnson, 

Grand-daughter of Mr. Charies Weston, 

who died 6th December 1795, 

Aged 13 years I month. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Sarah Moscrop, 

wife of William Moscrop, 

who died the 12th of January 1796, 

Aged XXII. years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Maria Brisco, 

Eldest daughter of 
Major General Horton Brisco, 
Obt. 16th May 1796, MtaX 24. 

Hin cillse lacr3rmK. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Capt. T. laeek, 

who departed this life on the 

2nd of August 1796, aged 24 years. 

This Monument erected by his disconsolate 

widow. 



He was an aflectioaaise husband ; a Ibnd pare 
Of unquestioned integrity •• a Judge, 
And a truly virtaous man. 
His loss was deeply and honorably regretti 
by that community wfaidi had 
long respected Ua virtues ; And the 
public reoorA of hit Goremment 
declare him to have been A Biagistrate 
Whose integrity in the diadmrge of hia 
public functions. 
Was only equalled by the Tirtnes 
of his private character. 
Social, yet dignified, he commanded at one 
the affections and r ev ere nce 
of the wide-extended cirde, honored 
by a participation of hit hospitalities ; 
but his noblest eulogium will be found 
in the lasting regrets of a long list 
of unfortunate persona ; 
whose indigent oonditiofn. 
By his advice, protection, and munificemx 
his life was one continued ttndy to melioral 
And must whoever regard him 
As a departed model of unexampled. 
Yet cautiously concealed charity ; 
The practical extent of which 

could alone be exceeded 

By the boundlesa benevolence 

and generosity of hia mind. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. mmiim Jona», 

who departed this lifie 
the 1st of Sept. 1796, aged 45 years. 

Miss Franeea Matilda lUil^iuMm, 

Bom 25th Sept. 1796, died 1st Nov. 179^ 
Aged 1 month and 6 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt A. Mnrmy, 
of the Bengal Establiahment, 
who died 7th Dec. 1796, aged 36 years. 

Master Oeor^e Best Rdbiaaoii, 

bom 3d Jan. 1795, died 9th Dec. 1796, 
Aged 23 months and 6 days. 

In Memory of one whom 
Grentleness, Benevolence, and Piety, 
endeared to private affection, and public esti 

Henrietta, 
Wife of Charles Rothman, Esq. 
Bom at Caermarthen, the 21st of Sept. 17! 
deceased at Calcutta the 25th of Dec. 179 
'* I know that my Redeemer liTeth, and ti 
He dhall stand at the latter day upon tt 
earth."— Job, xix. 25. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
The Hon. John Hyde, Esq. 
who was appointed one of the Puisne Judges, 
on the esteblishment of the Supreme Court 

at Calcutta, in the year 1774 ; 

And died, after faithfully and ably discharging 

the duties of that high station 

for a period of above twenty-one years, aged 59, 

On the 8th of July, 1796. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mary Anne Jones, 

Wife of Samuel Jones, 

who departed this life on the 

4th day of April 1797, aged 26years. 

Also to Ohriat. Robert and Hnimafa 

Her son and daughter, who both died Infa 

John Oamphell Bendenson, 

Obt. 2l8t Oct. 1797, Mt. 28 years. 



Mrs. Beallrii^.* 



* i'he name only is on the stone > she died c 
29lh July, 1797. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



8S 



Here lies enterred the body of 

Mr. Thomas 8ymrs Diim*. Architectp 

vfho departed this life on the 6th day of 

Dec. 1797, aged 35 years 7 months and 25 days. 

This Monument is erected to his memory 

by his widow, Maria Driver. 

This stone was erected 

by the desire of the affectionate widow of 

Capt James Thompson, 

late of Poplar near London, 

who died at Calcutta December 21, 1797, 

Aged 38 years. 

She rests in hope of meeting once again 
Her better half, never to sunder more ; 
Nor does she hope in vain ; the time draws on 
Where not a single spot of burial earth. 
Whether in land or in the spacious sea, 
But must give back its long committed dust 
inviolate. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Sarah Thomson, 
daughter of Mr. Alex. Sannell, 
who departed this life on the 
23d of January 1798, aged 20 years. 
Filia obsequenSf Uxor Amenta et Mater Benigne, 

To the Memory of 
Charles, the infant son of 
Bryant and Elizabeth Mason. 
Obt. 20th Jan. A. D. 1798, iEt. 1 M. 7 D. 



To the Memory of 
Oharles Ohristian Kionr, Esq. 
who departed this life the 22d of April 1798, 

Aged 41 years and 23 days. 

He was bom at Lyngbye in Denmark, on the 

29th day of April 1757. 

Catherine Harlot Gh^ene, 

daughter of Capt. Anthony Greene, 
died 28th of April 1798, 
Aged one year and eight months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Prudence Maanirell, 

who died the 9th of May 1798, aged 23 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Serjeant Major Peter Keamej, 

who departed this life the 4th of May 1798, 

Aged 36 years. 

This Monument was erected by hb 

disconsolate widow, in testimony of her affection. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
SackTille Marcos Ta^or, 

who departed this life the 
14th of September 1798, aged 42 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Anna Maria, 

the Honourable Mrs. Bruce, 

daughter of Sir Charles W. Blunt, Baronet. 

Married in 1795 the honourable Charles 

A. Bruce, brother of Thomas, EUu'l of 

Eglin and Kencardine, who died at Hoogly 

after one day's illness 

on the 19Ui of September 1798, aged 23 years. 

By a natural benevolence of mind 

and an unaffected and becoming dignity of 

manner, by a propriety of conduct, 

and examplary deportment upon all occasions, 

by glowing affections, as 

a daughter, a sister, a friend, and a wife, 

by a singular humanity 

and sincere sympathy with the distressed ; 

accomplished, graceful, and elegant, 

She attract^ love and esteem 

so far as her character reached. 

Let an unexpected fall in the vigour of life, 

a sudden extinction of so much accumulated 

virtue, the unfeigned tears of affection, 

the mournful solemnity of death, 

and the deep silence of the grave. 

Impress our minds with the fear of God, 

and his awful dispensations. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Dorothy Smith, 

who departed this life on 
the 1st of October 1798, aged 28 years. 
In all things sincere. 



Underneath lie the remains 

of Capt. Anthony Kvnt, 

late Commander of his Britannic Majesty's ship 

" La Virginie," 

and Post Captain in the Royal Navy ; 

who departed this life on the 10th day of 

August 1798, 

after a short illness, in the 28th year of his age, 

and who at that early age had acquired 

great honour in his profession, and the esteem 

and regard of all who had the honour of his 

acquaintance. 

By his death the Navy has lost 

one of its brightest ornaments, 

and society one of its most valuable members, 

for he lived greatly beloved and respected, 

and died unhrereaUy regretted. 

M 2 



The mortal part of 

Samuel Fairrax. Esq. 

Son of Sir William George Fairfax, 

is deposited here ; 

Born A. D. 1776, he died the 19th of Nov. 1798, 

deservedly regretted by all his friends. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Jean Tnlloh, 

wife of William TuUoh. 

She died the 27th May 1799, 

aged 53 years and 6 months. 

" I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that he 

shall stand at the latter day upon the earth." 



Anne lai^Ua Robertson, 

daughter of Colin and Elizabeth Robertson ; 
she died the 18th of Feb. 1800, 
Aged 2 years 6 months and 20 days. 
** Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid 
them not, for such is the kingdom of God." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Catharine Z«od|fe, 

Eldest daughter of William TuUob. 
She died the 24th July 1797, 
aged 23 years and 4 months. 

'' And Jesus answered and said unto her, Martha, 
Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many 
things ; but one thing is needful, and Mary hath 
chosen that good part, which shall not be taken 
away from her.*' 



84 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Sdward Oook«, Esq. 
Captain of H. M. Ship «« La Sybelle,' 
who received a mortal wound 
in a gallant action 
with the French Frigate ** I^a Forte,' 
which he captured in Balafsore Roads, 
March Ist 1799, and brought to this port 
where he died 23d May 1799, 
aged 26 years. 



»» 



>» 



Here lieth the body of 
IVUliam Johnson, Esq. 
rho departed this life on the 4th May 1799, 
aged 43 years. 



Here repose the earthly remains of 
Mr. Janios Miller, 

late Mint Master to the Honourable Company, 

who departed this life July 7th, 1799, in the 

fifty-fourth year of his age. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Slissabeth Beare, 

who was snatched from the bosom of 

an infant and tender family 

at the early age of 22, in childbed, 

on the 3d of August 1799, 

most sincerely regretted 

by her affectionate husband and friends, 

by whom this Monument was erected. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Daniel Monro, E«q. 

who departed this life at Calcutta 

the 2Gth day of Sept. 1799, aged 39 years. 



Sir John Meredyth, Dart.* 



Here lies the body of 
Mr. George Foreman, 

who died on the 31st October 1799, aged 40 years. 



Here lie the remains of 
Stephen John Sdmnnd Ziarria, Esq. 
who departed this life on tlie 6th Nov. 1799, 
aged 19 years, 9 months and 2 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Hug^h RendeL 

He departed this life on the 

3l8t of December 1799, aged 36 years. 



To tlie Memory of the Honourable 
Rose IVhitworth Aylmer, 

who departed thL^ life March 2d, A. D. 1800, 
aged 20 years. 

WTiat was her fate ? long, long before her hour, 
Death called her tender soul, by break of bibs, 
From the first blossoms, to the buds of joy ; 
Those few our noxious fate unblasted leaves 
In this inclement clime of human life. 



Olymphia Ohreene, 

daughter of Capt. Anthony Greene, 

died the 2l8t of March 1800, 

aged two years and two months. 



Marraret Mariaime Binae^y 

died 25th March 1800, 
aged two years and three months. 

Tho' ev'ry grace that dignifies the soul, 
(PresagM by infant loveliness) had join*d 
To ble^s thy steps in ev'ry walk of life 
And crown'd thy lengthened passage to the gra^ 
With bliss eternal, such as now is thine ; 
It may be that the mercies of thy God 
But early summons (then not premature) 
Absolv'd thy soul from trials of this world, 
Sav'd thee from all the varied ills of life ; 
Sav'd thee from pains of body, pang^ of soul. 
From anguish such as now, bereft of thee. 
Unceasing rends a mourning parent's breast. 

To t he Memory of 
IVilliam Olarke, 
departed this life 30th Apnl 1800, aged 32 yea 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Susan laedlie. 

the wife of Robert Ledlie, Esq. 

Barrister at Law. She died in Calcutta 

on the 26th of July in the year 1800, 

the 33d of her age. 

This Monument 

afflicted friendship consecrates 

To the Memory of 

Lieut. Robert Robinson 8h«i»pard, 

Late of the Coast Establishment, 

who departed this life at Calcutta, 

on the 10th day of November 1800, 

in the 23rd year of his age. 

Sheppard, farewell ! farewell ! dear noble youth 
Belov'd for honor, spirit, sense and truth. 
To Memory sacred. Worth's unfading ray 
Is fondly cherish' d to our closing day ; 
Oh ! could thy friend an equal coarse naaintain, 
How blest the hope that we might meet again. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Edmund Moronr, 

who departed this life 

on the third day of November 1800, 

aged 33 years. 

He was gifted with 

an excellence of heart, an urbanity of manner 

and a benevolence of disposition, 

which seldom came to the lot of one man ; 

and his virtues had so truly endeared him 

to his friends, that it is only when 

Memory shall fail to record them, 

that they can cease to regret his loss. 



* No date on this stone -, he died 27tb Oct. 1799. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. Robt. McFarlaney 
of Gartartane, in Scotland, free merchant, 
bom 3rd November 1727. 
He came to India in the year 1752, 
and died on the 28th December 1800. 
He ever maintained a character of 
respectability and worth, for his pablic duty 

was directed by integrity ; 

his private life by the spirit of Christianity, 

disclosed in acts of generosity and benevolence 

■■ ■ 

Sacred to the Memory of 
IVUliam Moscrop, Esq. 
who died in Calcutta on the 14th of January 
in the year 1801, the 44th of hia age. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



85 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Harriet Hunt, 

wife of Philip Hunt, 
Obt. 26th January 1801, iEtatis 21 years. 
Rest, gentle Harriet, rest in peace, 
Secure from vanity and noise ; 
For here thy earthly sorrows cease. 
From hence commence thy heavenly joys ; 
Short was thy span, — 'tis past, 'tis gone, — 
Early thou reach'd th' appointed goal. 
Freed from it's clogs, and upwards flown. 
Angels received thy spotless soul. 
Her ways were ways of pleasantness. 
And all her paths were peace. 



Here lieth the body of 
Capt. H. Carey, 
who departed this Ufe 
Feb. 26th, 1801, aged 34 years. 

Richard Thoroton, 

Died 14th March 1801, 
aged 4 years, 7 months and 15 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. David Macalester, 
who departed this Ufe on the 
16th of March 1801, aged 30 years. 

Peter liainf^, 

Died April 26th 1801, aged 7 days. 

To the Memory of 

Thomas Halket, Esq. 

of the Honorable Company's Civil Service, 

who departed this life on the 28th of April 1801, 

in the 21st year of his age. 

Hapless flower, by fate prevented. 
Ere to blossom scarce began ; 
Early in thy doom lamented, 
For fiill soon thy course is ran ; 
Lately we beheld him leading 
Artful pleasure's gay career ; 
Soon, alas ! stern death succeeding, 
Veil'd him in the silent bier. 
Some of us, perhaps, to-morrow, 
Like our friend, may meet their doom ; 
Freely then indulge your sorrow, 
O'er his much lamented tomb. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
M n». Frances Smith, 

Daughter of (the late) Bryan Scotney, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 30th day 

of May in the year of our Lord Christ 1801, 

aged 35 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
John MHlson, 
A man whose virtues endeared him 
to his friends and to society. 
He died on the 3rd June 1801, 
aged 38 years. 
In the adjoining Tomb are deposited 
the remains ot Jean IVihion, 
whose death he deplored as the heaviest affliction 
and whom he did not long survive. 

They were lovely in their lives, 
and by death they are again united. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Jean IVilson, 

Daughter of the late Mr. John Hunter, 

Kilmarnock, 

who died the 29th of April 1800, aged 30 years. 



In Memory of 

Mr. Jauies Bcott, 

Died 11th June 1801, aged 32 years. 

Also his daughter, 

Slisabeth Bcott, 

Died 18th April 1800, 

aged 2 years and 14 days. 



Capt. Robert Zng^ledew, 
died 18th June 1801, aged 29 years. 

Mrs. Anne Tomkins, 

died Dec. 1st 1801, aged 18 years. 



Here lieth the body of 
Miss Adelaide Berrie, 

daughter of William Berrie, Esq. 

departed this life 18th Dec. 1801, 
aged 5 years 11 months. 



To the Memory of 
Harriet, and Caroline Aof^nsta Smith, 

Daughters of J. B. Smith, Esq. 
of the Civil Service on Uiis establishment. 

Harriet, 
bom October 17tii 1784, died May 3rd 1801. 

Caroline Augusta, 
bom August 20th, 1794, died May 30th, 1800. 



Mrs. 



Sacred to the Memory of 



the wife of 



Thomas Hayes, Esq. of the Hon. 

East India Company's Service, 

who departed this life on board the 

** Sir Stephen Lushington," Indiaman, 

on the 29th of December 1801, aged 26 years. 

A tender parent, a sincere friend, 

Lov'd in her life, lamented in her end. 



Sacre aux reliques. 
Oeorg^e Richard Folej, 

Qui Moura't Heme Mai 1801, 

Age 48 Ans. 

Ce Monument est construit 

par Une Amie. 



To the Memory of 

Bdwai^d Bjre Bnrves, Esq. 

Senior merchant in the service of 

the Honorable East India Company ; 

he died May the 23rd, 1801, aged 58 yean. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Blisabeth Dickson, wife of 
Comet R. L. Dickson, 2d Regt. Nat. Cavalry, 
Obiit 20th Feb. 1802, Mt, 20 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Master John Bntler, 

son of John and Lydia Elizabeth Butler, 

who departed this life of the small-pox 

on the 3d March 1802, 

aged 2 years, 8 months and 9 days. 

This Monument is erected by his affectionate 

parents as a lasting testimony of their love. 

** The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away 

blessed be the name of the Lord.'' 



Mr. John IViUcocks,* aged 49. 
No date on this stone ; he died April 5th 1802. 



86 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Here lietli the remaiiui of 

Misn Mary ChoUet, 

who departed this life on the 14th of April 1802, 

aged 24 years and 6 monthn. 

Captain R. Tolloh, 
ObUt 6th May 1802, JEt, 38. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. GathArine Slisabeth Iiyneh, 

the wife of Captain Francis Lynch, who departed 
this life on the 21st of July 1802, 
aged 19 years, 1 month and 4 days. 
A tender parent, a sincere friend, 
Lov'd in her life, lamented in her end. 



This Monument is Sacred 

to the Memory of 

Mrs. MaiT Arthur, 

who departed this life on the 

I4th day of Sept. 1802, aged 37 years. 

I>. Hoaaaek, 

Master Pilot in the 

Honorable Company's Service, 

died 15th Sept. 1802, aged 40 years. 



are considered as estimable qualities. 
so long will be remembered and regretted 
by a numerous circle of friends, by one of who 
this tribute to departed worth is offered. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Jokn Kennady, £!sq. 

Assistant Surgeon, 

who died Deceml^ 1802. 

His death has depriTcd his profession 

and society of one of their greatest ornaments 

and numerous friends will long and sincerely 

lament his loss. 



To the Memory of 

Eb«neaer Golemaa, Esq. 

who died 16th Sept. 1802, aged — years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Sdvirard Shapcota, of the H. C. Marine, 

who departed this life on the 18th of Oct. 1802, 

aged 29 years. 
O ! where my soul, is there a friend so just ? 
Or after thee, a man 1 can so trust. 



To the Memory of 

John Bristoir, Esq. 

who departed this liife on the 

20th of October, 1802, aged 52 years. 

A. Moorhaad, 

carpenter of the ** United Kingdom, '^ 
died 7th Nov. 1802, aged 63 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Robert Mason, late Purser 

of the Honorable Company's Ship *' Baring,'* 

who departed this life the 24th Nov. 1802, 

aged 37 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Edward Daah^vood, 
eldest son of Thomas Dashwood, Esq. 

who departed this life 
the 22d of Dec. 1802, aged 19 years. 



Here reposeth the body of 
Mr. John laawrence^ 

who departed tiiis life on the 
19th day of January 1803, aged 17 years. 
This Monument was erected by his 
beloved imcle. Captain David Pkrker. 

Here lie the body of 
Joshua ^VhittaU, 

who departed this life on the 
23d of Jan. A. D. 1803, aged 27 years. 



Lieut.-Col. — ««.^.««y 
departed this life, 
on the 5th February 1803, aged 52 years. 

Thoaaas Hollingbery, 

died the 9th Feb. 1803, ag^ 26 years and 

6 months. 

(In all things sincere). 

BSary Ann Samson. 

departed this life Feb. 23d 1803, 
aged 11 months, 3 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Jacob OhristiMn V. Deurs, 

the infant son of G. A. V. Dears, Esq. 

who was bom the 24 th October 1800, 

and died the 9th March, 1803. 



.. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
ZXorton Briscoe, 

Major General on the Bengal Establishment, 

who departed this life 

the 25th day of December 1802, aged 61 years. 

This meritorious Officer 

during a period of 40 years of unremitted service, 

Distinguished himself by his attachment 

to his profession ; 

ever zealous in the discharge of its duties, 

fulfiling them 

with fidelity and integrity to the State ; 

and honor and credit to himself as a 

man ; while good nature, hospitality, 

and kindness of heart, 



To the Memory of 
Henrj Frost, Esq. 
Captain on the Marine Establishment at Bombs 
and late commander of the ** Momington" Cruize 
in which capacity 
he distinguished himself by Uie capture of the 
French Privateer ** Eugene," 
and by other public services. 
Obt. Calcutta, March 15th 1803, iEt«t. 30. 
In his premature death was r e gi e tl c d 
the loss of a gallant officer, 
a warm friend, and a worthy man. 



To the Memonr of 
Mrs. Oatherine Thomas, 

relict of the late Mr. John Thomas, 

who departed this life April 6th, 1803, 

aged 50 years. 

This Monument is erected by her 

disconsolate daughter, Elizabeth Thomas. 

To the Memory of 
John MacdoiuJd, 

who died 9th May 1803, aged 32 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss BSary Sherwood. 
who departed this life May 28th 1803, 
aged 1 year and 9 months. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



87 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Vmiliam Ohitton, 

Hho departed this life 30th May 1803, 
aged 25 years and 5 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Amelia Hopkb&s, 

who departed this life, June 8th, 1803, 
aged 24 years. 



To the Memory of 
Henrj John Darell, Ksq. 
of Cale Hill in the county of Kent, 
who died the 7th July 1803, aged 31 years. 

To the Memory of 

Bernard Maecnllnm, Enq. 

who died the 22nd July, 1803, aged 60 years. 



To the Memory of 

IVilliam Archibald Edmonstone, Esq. 

eldest son of Sir Archibald Edmonstone, Bart. 

as a tribute of respect and fraternal affection, 

this monument is erected. 

Obiit. 7th SeptembriB, A. D. 1803. iEtatis 45. 

(on the west side.) 

'* Is there not an appointed time for man upon 
eartli ? 

" Are not his days also like the days of an 
hireling ? 

*^ The eye of him that hath seen him shall see 
him no more ?'* 

** The dust hath returned to the earth as it was, 
and the spirit hath returned to God who gave it." 

" This corruptible hath put on incorruption, 
and this mortal hath put on immortality." 

** Blessed be the God and father of our Lord 
Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant 
mercy hath begotten us again into a living hope 
by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. 
To an inheritance incorruptible, undefiled and 
that fadeth not away.' 



ft 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain Thoniaa Sdward Creig^hton, 

Mariner in the country service, 

who died much regretted, 

13th September 1803, aged 26 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Miss Slisa Bart Tnrner, 

bom Dec. lOth 1802, died Sept. 24th 1803. 

Also 

Mr. Cleorre IV^uf hton Tomer, 

bom May 14th 1801, died May 24th 1807. 



To the Memory of 

Alexander Patrick Johnstone, Esq. 

late on the Bengal Civil I^tablishment 

of the Honorable East India Campany, 

who expired on the 11th November 1803, 

aged twenty-five years, eleven months and one 

day, who, to the strictest integrity, 

and to uncommon maturity of judgment, 

united the mildest manners ; 

extensive benevolence ; 

and all the social and tender affections ; 

under the guidance of which principles, 

he invariably maintained the diaracter of 

a public officer 

with credit and honor to himself ; 



and discharged, 

in the most pious and exemplary manner, 

the various duties of 

a son, a brother, a husband, a father and a friend. 

To commemorate those virtues, 

this Monument has been erected by her 

who is best able to judge of their influence and 

effects ; and who is anxious to record this testimony 

of the felicity of their conjugal union, 

during a period of nearly four years ; 

of the affection, love, gratitude, and reverence 

which she feels for his memory ; 

and of the deep and indelible anguish which 

tlie premature loss of him has impressed upon her 

mind. 



To the Memory of 
John Campbell, M. D. 

Assistant Surgeon in the Service of 

the Honorable East India Company, 

who was carried off by a fever, 

at the Greneral Hospital, Presidency, on the 

19th November 1803, at the early age of 24. 

Eheu ! Fugaces ! 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Arthur, 

who departed this life 23rd November, 1803, 

in the 24 th year of her age. 

Her mind and person were adorned 

w^ith grace and accomplishments, 

and her heart was enobled by virtues, 

that endeared her 

to all her acquaintance. 

In the various relations of 

wife, daughter, sister, and friend, 

her duty and affection were unlimited. 

She sustained with Christian fortitude a mother's 

pain, but survived not long to participate 

a mother's joy. 

A more benign and amiable spirit, 

never winged its way to heaven. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Philip Bnttieas, 

late Chief Officer of the *• Hugh Inglis." 

he departed this life 
the 8th day of December 1803, aged 27. 
He was a most deserving officer 
and beloved by all that knew him. 
This Monument was erected 
by his friend and shipmate, Capt. Franklin, 
by desire of his much esteemed jfriend and protec- 
tor, Mr. Leeth, of Harrow in England. 



Beneath this stone is deposited 

the body of 

Mrs. ZtlTina Ursula Sutton, 

who departed this life, December 14th 1803. 

Aged 42 years. 



Captain John Palmer, 

of the ship *' Experiment." 
Nat. 1777, Ob. 1803. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

("aptain John Horn, 

who departed this life on the 

17th January 1804, aged 39 years. 



88 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



To the memory of 
Frances Slisabeth Sutton Ghray, 

who departed this life January 20th 1804, 

in the 4l8t year of her age. 

Leaving a family of nine children 

to lament their loss. 
This Monument is erected by her 

affectionate husband, 

in testimony of respect and esteem 

for the many eminent and excellent qualities 

she possessed, as a wife, a mother and a ft'iend. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Lady (Charlotte Elisabeth) Hesilrin^, 

daughter of the late Capt. and Mrs. F. E. S. Gray, 
and the wife of Capt. Henry William Wilkinson, 

B. N. I. 
who departed this life at sea 8th January 181 7 » 

in the 35th year of her age. 

After a most severe and painful illness, which 

she bore with exemplary fortitude and resignation. 

A most affectionate Wife, 

A tender parent, and a most sincere friend, 

Loved during life, and lamented in her end. 

In Memory of 

Captain Z«awrence Zlenderson, 

who departed this life, January 29th 1804, 

aged forty-two years. 

Much regretted and lamented 

by all his acquaintance. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

J. S. Sngel, Esq. 

who died on the 22nd February A. D. 1804, 

aged 68 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain l^illiam Mackay, 

who died 27th March 1804, aged 22 years. 

This marble would express, 

the affections of relations and esteem of friends, 

for him whose characteristics 

were unaffected worth and manly fortitude, 

in how eminent a degree, 

he possessed the latter quality, 

his interesting narrative 

of the Ship-wreck of the Jimo, 

will testify to future times. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Orace Depstell, 

who departed this life 
June 23d 1804, aged 12 years. 



To the Memory of 
Frederick IVilliams, 

who departed this life 24th July 18Q4, 
aged 6 months and 14 days. 



Blisabeth Rom, 

the infant daughter of D. Ross, Esq. 

bom 20th August 1803, and Obit Ist August 

** Suffer little children to come unto m( 

and forbid them not, for of such is the 

Kingdom of God." 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Miss ZUiaa Golebrooke, 

who departed this life 

the 9th August 1804, aged 1 year. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. V^, Bomerrille, 

Nat. December 5th 1786, 

August 18th 1804, Mort. e 

JEa. jux 18, 

Quam multium flebelis ; 

Unico Fratriamicoque imposuit 

Alexander Mackenzie. 



Captain John l^rif ht, 

who departed this life September Ist 180 

aged 42 years. 

This Monument is erected by his friends 

Messrs. Colvin, Bazett and Co. 



To the Memory of 
Richard Sdmund Rndd, Esq. 
who departed this life September 6th 180 
aged 35 years. 



Under this stone lie the remains of 

Caroline, 

the wife of Captain George Baynhara, 

of H. M. Ceylon Regt. of Infantry, 

(the best of wives and the best of mothers) 

she died on the 1st May 1804, aged 22 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Marearet Mercer, 

daughter of Nlr. Charles Weston, 

who departed this life on the 29th May 1804, 

at the early age of 27 years, 3 months and 5 days, 

a tender mother, an affectionate wife, 

and a dutiful daughter, 

loved and lamented by those who knew her. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Ann Hayv^ood, 

wife of Isaac Haywood, 

who departed tins life 

on the 30th day of May 1804, 

aged 17 years and 7 months. 

" Comfort ye, comfort ye my people, saith your 

God." Is. XL. 1. 



Here lies deposited the mortal part of 
Benjandn L* Hofhes, Esq. 
who departed this life the 8u September IS 
aged 33 years. 

To the Memory of 

Mrs. Mary Harriet Hughes, 

who departed this life on the 

14th day of September 1804, aged 20 year 

universally beloved and esteemed, 

and now deeply lamented by all her acquainti 



Hie depositum est quod Mortals fiiit, 
Joannis Oanlfield, 

Hac vita Sept. 25th, Anno. 1804. 
iEtat sus trigisimo tertio ErepHi. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Snsana l^eldon, 
who departed this life 6th November, 1804 
aged 28 ye^irs ; 
also of her daughter, 
Miss Catherine Weldon, 
who died 5th February, 1802, aged 11 yeai 
" The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken ai 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



SOUTH PARK STKEET BURIAL GROUND. 



89 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Mmry Sde, 
who died at Calcutta on the 
22d day of November 1804, 
aged 35 years, 1 month and 3 days ; 
she was the affectionate mother of two sons, 
James, bom on the 22d November 1790, 
and George, bom the 4Ui June 1792. 
In testimony of his love and esteem for her virtues, 
this Monument was erected by her husband, 
James Ede. 
' ' Shall we receive good at the hand of the Lord 
and shall we not receive evil ?" — Isaiah. 



Here lies tlie body of Mrs. M. G. Kramer, 
wife of the late Adjutant Kramer of the 
Dutch Company's Service, Chinsurah, who de- 
parted this life November 23, 1804, aged 35 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Marg^aret Maria Moacrop, 

who departed this life Dec. 7, 1804, aged 15 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

John Allen, 

(son of Richard Allen, Esq. of Chittagong) 

who died while at Serampore School, 

December 13th 1804, aged 10 years. 

Why should I say 'Tis yet too soon, 
To seek for Heaven or think of death ; 

A flower may fade before 'tis noon. 
And I this day may lose my breath. 

1 o the Memory of Mrs. Znixabeth Hunt, 

wife of P. Hunt, who departed this hfe 

full of faith, hope and joy, 

on the 14th December 1804, 

aged eighteen years and three months. 

** Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord." 

Likewise her son Anthony Hnnt. 

who departed this life on the 13th September 1804, 

aged 9 months and 16 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

V^tmYUB Orrok, Knq. 

Late commander of the Honourable Company's 

Ship " Lord Nebon," 

who departed this life on the 

11th day of January 1805, aged 54 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Haatini^ Znipej, Ki»q. 

Son of Sir Elijah Impey, 

factor in the Service of the East India Company, 

who died in the 24th year of his age, 

Febraary 4th 1805. 

With gentle manners, and with modest worth, 
Meekly he spent his destin'd course on earth, 
Belov'd, and most by those who knew him best ; 
Deep were his virtues on their hearts impress'd ; 
The dutious son, fond brother, and kind friend. 
Are each deplor'd in his untimely end. 
y ivat Anima Beata ? 



Sacred to the Memory of 

IVIrs. BUsabeth VSTells, 

daughter of Mr. George Gooding, 

and wife of Mr. Joseph Wells, 

who departed this life on the 1 1th day of May, 

in the year of our Lord 1805, 

aged 16 years and 29 days. 

A dutiful wife and an affectionate daughter ; 

in love she lived and in peace she died, 

greatly regretted. 

N 



Sa cred to the Memory of 
Mr. mrUliam Ownrnfag, 

who departed this life on the 
13th of May, 1805, aged 42 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of John Johnaon, 
late Conductor of Ordnance 
on tlie Bengal Military Establishment, 
who departed this life on the 
13th of May 1805, aged 42 years. 



To the Memory of 

Captain Gkorg^e French, 

Assistant Deputy Master Attendant in the 

Service of the Honourable Blast India Company, 

who departed this life on the 31st May 1805, 

aged 56 years. 



Here lieth the body of Mr. Janiea Moat, 

of the Honourable Company's Marine Service, 

who departed tliis life on the 14th June 1805. 



1 o the Memory of Catharine Parker, 

who departed this life on the 23d of July 1805, 
aged 2 years and 8 months. 



John Ifinley Cantelo, 

Obut July 29th 1805. 

Sacred to the Memory of O. Ohreene, 

Major General on the staff, 

and Commandant of Artillery, 

who departed this life 31st July, 1805, 

aged 58 years. 

During a period of 36 years, 

he distinguished himself 

by his attachment to his profession, 

ever zealous in the discharge of its duties, and 

fulfilling them with fidelity and integrity 

to the state. 



Secred to the Memory of Mary, 

the wife of Charles Becher, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 

10th day of August 1805, aged 23 years. 



To the Memory of Blisabeth, 
wife of Mr. John Lewis, 
who departed this life 6th October 1805, 

aged 20 years. 
A tender parent, a sincere friend, 
Lov'd in her life, lamented in her end. 



To the Memory of the 
Reverend Thonuus Francis Hartwell, 

Chaplain on this Establishment, 

who died at Madras on the 29th of October 1805, 

aged 27 years and 3 months. 

In vain would weeping melancholy bind 
Around this sacred urn the cypress shade. 
No gloom attend his memory, for his mind 
Reflects a radiance which can never fade. 
Our deep rqgret, our chasten'd sorrow mourn 
The lots of one with piety so fraught; 
His smiles could lure the sinner to return 
Alike by practice and by precept taught. 
But not from us can flow the suffrage due 
A higher tribute shall his worth proclaim, 
Religion will lament a son so true 
And virtue celebrate her vot'ry's name. 



90 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mai7 SUxabeth Fag-an, 

who after a painful and lingering illness, 

borne with fortitude, 

and submitted to with resignation, 

departed this life, on the 10th of November, 1805, 

in the 32d year of her age. A husband, 

whose youthful attachment was confirmed by 

reflection, and not impaired by absence ; 

and a brother, 

in whom the affectionate intercourse of childhood 

was the earnest of the protecting 

kindness of riper years, 

have erected this Monument, 

the Memorial of a wife and of a sister, 

by her virtues, not less than by those ties tenderly 

endeared to both, with a mind highly cultivated, 

and every essential quality of the heart 

and understanding, she united 

a mild dignity of manners that won the affections, 

while it ensured the respect of all who knew her. 

Whosoever thou art, 

whom grief or melancholy leads to this 

unfrequented spot, thou hast probably, 

a daughter, a sister, and a wife,and perhaps a friend ; 

pause over the tomb of one, whose untimely end 

did not prevent her to have discharged, 

in a manner eminently exemplary, 

the duties of all those various relations of life. 

Impressed with the full extent 

of the loss they have sustained, 

her numerous relations will ever cherish and 

revere her Memory. Her husband, 

whose early discernment of her exalted merit 

constituted the pride and happiness of his days, 

will rest his consolation 

on the hope of imitating those virtues 

which have secured to her a blessed immortality. 



Mrs. A. E. l^edderbom, 

Relict of Hy. Wedderbum, Esq. 

who fulfilled every relative duty of life, 

as wife, mother, daughter and sister, 

with the highest credit to herself, 

and whose virtues were an honour to her sex. 

In gratitude for her sisterly love and bounty, 

her affectionate brother 

inscribed this humble tribute : 

Sacred to her Memory, 

whose love by the Grace of Almighty God 

is in Heaven. Deceased A. D. ISC^, aged 55. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Ann Mendes, 

who departed this life February 26, 1808, 

aged 22 years ; 

Wife of Mr. W. Mendes. 

this Monument is erected to her Memory 

by her disconsolate mother, Mrs. Smith. 

Mr. Jokn Harvey, 

late chief officer of the ship ** Henry Wellesley," 
who departed this life March 27th 1806, aged 27 



Ijawrence Oall, Esq 

Obit. 27th April 1806, aged 61 years. 

Of misfortunes, my good friend, 

you have had a certain portion ; pass that by, 

you have been a very — very good son ; 

as kind a brother ; 

a tender and affecionate husband ; 

one to be numbered among the best of fathers ; 



a faithful friend ; a humane benefitrtor, 

and a strictly honest man. 

( On the rererse .-) 

I his is Iflawranca OhilTs tomb, 

consecrated by his son and daaghtcra ; 

as a testimony of filial affeetion 
which has superseded all other duties. 

It was thy fate O Gall, to live 
long enou^ to see thyself neglected 
by tho«e friends who ought to have served tli 
To thee and thine fortune has been unkind 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Kenrj HoUinipSy 
late a Capt. in the 66 R^ B. N. I. 
Died at Lucknow, 22nd Feb. 1847, aged 33 y« 

Bliaabath Bobs, 

the infiint daughter of D. Roes, Esq. 

bom 20th Augut, 1803, 

and Obit 1st August, 1804. 

'* Suffer little children to come unto me and 
bid them not, for of such is the kingdom of & 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Blima Ann. 
Daughter of Henry and Helen Mathew. 
who departed this life on the 28th April 180 
aged 1 year, 2 months and 26 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander Oamegy, Esq. M. D. 
who departed this life on the 23rd May, 180 
aged 63 years. 



Thomas Boileaa, 

bom the 1 4th of December 1754, 
and died on the 11th Jane 1806. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Oeor|^ Boydf £sq. 

Head Surgeon at tins Presidencj, 

who departed this lifie on the 
16th of July 1806, aged 60 year*. 



To the Memonr of 
Francis Perai^rine Knloch, Esq. 

Son of Sir James Kinloch, Bart, 
Obit 24th August 1806, aged 58. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. M. Denwison, 
aged 26 years. And her in&nt daughter, 
who were here interred on the 

30th September 1806. 

And of Capt. B. 8. Dennlsony 

who surrived his wife and child but a few daj 

for on the 16th of October 

followed their decease, 

He was united to them in death, 

and buried in the same grave beneath this 

Monument, in the 31st year of his age. 



Sacred to the Mem ory o f 
Master Robert Raban iftnisony 

the infant son of Lieut..Ck)l. Samuel AVilson 

of the Bombay Establishment, 

who was bora on the 15th of August 

and departed this life on the 14th of Oct. 180 

aged 2 months.. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



91 



To the MemoiT of 

Al«3ua&der Allardice, Ksq. 

who departed this life, 

on the 2d November A. D. 1806, aged 50 yean, 

much respected and lamented by his friends, 

and all who had the pleasure of knowing him. 

To the Memory of JMaster A. Allardice, 

son of Alexander Allardice, Esq. 

who departed this life 26th February 1807, 

aged 4 years, 3 months and 12 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Marg^aret, 

wife of Philip Dundas, Esq. 

Governor of Prince of Wales Island, 

died in Calcutta 7th Nov. 1806. 



Here lies the body of 
HeniT FozaU HaU, 

who departed this life on the 
21st Nov. 1806, aged nearly 4 years. 

To his Memory 

this Monument has been erected by his 

afflicted parents, John and Jean Hall. 

Here lies the body of 
Alexander Hare Hall, 

who departed this life, on the 12th April 1808, 

aged 1 year 7 months. 

To his Memory this Monument is erected 

by his afflicted parents, John and Jean Hull. 

Robert Talbot, 

died 21st Nov. 1806, aged 3 months. 

To the Memo ry of 
Mr. James VTittaxnore, 

Master in the H. C. Pilot Service, 

who departed this life on the 

15th of December 1806, aged 36 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. MTilliam Howe, 

who departed this life on the 1st January 1807, 

in the 27th year of his age. 
This modest stone, what few vain marbles can, 
May truly say, here lies an honest man. 

To the Memory of Mrs. Soaanna A|^|^8, 

who departed this life on the 

7th January 1807, aged 41 years. 

To the Memory of 

IXTUliam Towahend Jones, Enq. 

Attorney at Law, 

who departed this life 24th January 1807, 

aged 50 yean. 

Much respected and lamented by a numerous 

acquaintance. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut S. 8. FrisseU, 
Assistant to the Resident at Poona, 
a young man whose superior abilities, 
extraordinary attainments, and high integrity, ren- 
dered him an ornament to public and private life. 
He died on the 2d of February 1807, 
aged — years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Arthur Hastingpi Vansittart, E»q. 

of the Bengal Civil Service, 

who died on the 19th February, 1807| 

aged 33 yean. 

M 2 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Jobn Dalj, Esq. lute ot Madras, 

who departed this life April 18th, 1807. 

This Monument is erected by his 

widow, Rachael Susanna Daly. 

Sacred to the Memorv of 
Sleanora Sophia Mackintosh, 

(wife of Lachlan Mackintosh) ; 

a woman who united in the most eminent degree 

the virtues of a real Christian 

and a most dutiful and affectionate 

wife, mother, and sister. 

She died on the 15th May, 1807f aged 52 years. 

In Memory also of ner son Eneas, 
who died on the 6th June 1807, aged 14 months. 



This Monument is erected by 

Mi^or Christopher Johnston, 

H. M. 8th Light Dragoons, to the Memory of 

Cornet Andren^ Johnston, 

late of the above Regiment, 

who died May 16, 1807, aged 31 years. 

Here are deposited the remains of 

Capt. William l^arden, 

who died in command of his Majesty's 

ship ** Rattlesnake,'' in the Bay of Bengal, 

on the 5th June 1807, aged 28 years. 

To commemorate the private worth and professional 

merits of the promising officer, this Monument 

is erected by his Commander-in-Chief 

as a tribute of regard to his Memory. 

To the Memory of Capt. l^illiatn GheeTer, 

of the American ship ** Mount Vernon," 

who departed this life on the 27th June 1807, 

aged 33 years. 



i o the Memory of Mr. IXTilliam Bro 
who departed this life July 2d, 1808, 
aged 48 years. 
Also Mrs. Marj Broinm, 
who departed this life Nov. 10th, 1807. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Marj Beewnn, 

a native Christian, distinguished by her piety 

and virtue, who died in the 36th year of her age, 

August 9th A. D. 1807. 

Qnliemus Jaekaon, 

Obit XXIV. dies Augusti, A. D. MDCCCVII, 

iEtatis suae LIV. 



I 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. TVlUiam Maedoni^, 

of the Bengal Engineers, 

who died September the 16th A. D. 1807, 

aged 27 years. 

To an excellent understanding, and extensive 

knowledge, especially of Asiatic Literature, 

which enabled 

him to discharge with credit and puplic utility, 

the duties of Assistant Professor of the 

Hindoostanee language 

in the Coll^ of Fort William : 

The united principles of 

religion, integrity, and honor, which rendered him 

universally esteemed and respected, 

and the most amiable disposition and manners, 

which endeared him to all who knew him. 

Maltesille bonis flebilis ocudit ; 

Nnlli ilebeUar quam Mihi. 



92 



S0U1« PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



tt 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Geori^ Thompson, £iq. 

senior merchant on the Bengal 

Civil Establishment 

of the Honorable Elast India Company, 

who departed this life on the 1st October 1807* 

on board the Honorable Company's ship ''Union 

at Saugor Roads, aged 46 years. 



To the Memory of Capt. Denis Bodkin, 

of H. M. 67th Regt. Light Infantry, 

who departed this life on the 7 th Oct. 1807, 

aged 26 years. 

This Monument, a tribute of esteem and affection, 

was erected by his brother-officers. 

To the Memory of 

Thomas Iiiell| Esq. 

of the H. C. Civil Service, 

who departed this life 23d October, 1807, 

aged 25 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
The late l^illiam Douf hty, 
who departed this life November 2lst, 1807, 
aged 38 years. 



In Memory of 

Gcori^e Urqnhart las-wti^, Esq. 

Obiit 25th November, 1807, i£Ut 55 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr<. Hannah Robinson, 
who departed this life on the 
25th November 1807, aged 54 years. 
Afflictions sore long time I bore, 
Which wore my strength away. 
And made me long for endless rest. 
That never will decay. 



To the Memory ofChidlej Ooote, Esq. 

Surgeon on this Establishment, 

and nephew of Sir Eyre Coote, K. B. 

who died 5th December, 1807, aged 48 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Anna Maria lIod|fkinsOB, 

wife of Mr. C. Hodglunson. 

By a faithful discharge of 

the duties of a pious and humane Christian, 

affectionate wife, tender mother, 

and a sincere friend ; 

by the capacity, sympathy and benevolence of her 

mind, and the practice of every virtue 

which could adorn the longest life ; she attracted 

love, esteem and admiration upon earth ; 

but she finished her course also too early, 

on the 22nd December 1807, aged 29 years. 

Leaving a husband and five in&nts 

to experience her loss. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain Thomas l^ard Howard, 

of the Bengal Native Infantry, 

who departed this life the 24 th December 1807, 

aged 42 years. 



To the Memory of 



To the Memory of 
James Bdmiston, Esq. 

of the Honorable Company's Civil Service, 
who died on the 3l8t Dec. 1807, aged 40 years. 



Mr. JamosBowrboB, ' 

who departed this life December 31st, 180 
Aged 31 years. 
An affectionate husband, a tender father, 
and a sincere friend. 



To the Memory of Mr. Thomas Garr, 
of the Honorable Company's Pilot Servio 
who died January 9th, 1808, aged 67 yea 

By nature form'd for every social part. 
Mild were his manners and sincere his hea 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Maria Spottiswoode, 

wife of Thomas Spottiswoode, £^q. 
who died on the X. of January MDCCCVI 
having tenderly endeared herself in the vari< 
relations of daughter, wife, mother, and frie 
at the early age of nineteen. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Marj Xves, 
who departed this life on the 11th January 1 

aged 19 years. 
Of excellence, a pattern here is laid; 
In life a feithful friend, and honor'd wife. 
Nature's great debt in humble hope she pal 
To rise to Angel's bliss and endless life. 



1 o the Memory of the late John ••» ^ 
aged 22 years, one month and 15 days, 
who died on the 13th January 1808. 
Erected by his beloved sister Maria Stacchi 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Charlotte Hnnter, 

wife of William Hunter, M. D. 

who on the 19th of February 1808, 

calmly resigned 

a life spent in the exercise of genuine piet 

and in the zealous and affectionate 

discharge of filial, conjugal, parental and to 

duties, aged 30 years. 

Sacred to the Memory and to tiie virtuas ( 

Mrs. Prances Fombelle. 

the wife of Mr. John FombeUe, 

a Senior Merchant in the Service 

of the East India Company in Bengal, 

who departed this transitory life 
on Friday, the 8th day of April 1808, 
aged 40 years. 
'* In the Pious hope of a joyful Resnrrectio 
through the Mediation of her Bleeied Redeen 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Gherrj Gtook, 

wife of Mr. William Cook, of the H. C. Ma 

who departed this life April 25, 1806, 

aged twenty-six years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
John 8hep]»7' Drorj, 
first Lieutenant of his Majesty's Ship " Modes 
who died 29th April 1808, aged 24 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain John Gallowagr, 

who died 16th May 1808, aged 34 years. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



93 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Captftin Peter Henry, 

of his Majesty's fourteenth Regiment of Infantry, 
son of Mr. Thomas Henry, F. R. S., London, 
and President of the Literary and Philosophical 
Society of Manchester. 
His zeal in the discharge of the duties of 
his profession, 
his uniform kindness to the subalterns and privates 
of the Regt., and his friendly and social disposi- 
tion, joined to his other virtues, 
rendered his death a source of real sorrow • 
to the officers of the distinguised corps 
in which he had served above ten years. 
He died June 4th, 1808, aged 24 years. 



In Memory of • 

Mr. l^ederic Jacobi, 

who departed this life the 12th June 1808, 
aged 61 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Henry Chmrles Matthew, 

son of Helen and Henry Matthew, 

bom 17th September 1807, died 27th June 1808. 

aged 10 months and 10 days. 



Here He tbe remains of Sophia, 

daughter of John and Mary Fendall, 

bom the 27th April 1805, died the 28th July 1808. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Robert Duncan, Esq. 

bom the 24th April 1752, 

in the Parish of Manchester, in the county of 

Aberdeen, died August 1st, 1808, 

aged 50 years, 2 months and 26 days. 

He was a dutious son, and affectionate husband, 

and at all times a kind friend to the poor and needy. 



Here lies the remains of 
Mt9, Catharine Jeykell Browne, 

who departed this life on the 

8th day of August 1808, aged 38 years. 

She was an excellent wife, and a most 

affectionate mother. 



In Memory of Mrs. Anne Judah, 
who died 11th August 1808, aged 29 years. 
** She waa adorned with meeiness and chose 

that good party which shall not be taken 

away from her/* Luke 10, veree 42. 

What then is this essential thing 

Which did relief and comfort bring, 

E'en in the view of death ! 

God's fiKVOur shown thro' Christ the Lord ; 

This can alone trae peace afford, 

And certain hope in death. 
This tribate of affection was erected by her 
husband, C. A. Judah. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Peter McArthnr, 

who departed this life Aug^t 20, 1808, 

aged 32 years. 

AIm Mr. wllliani McArthnr, 

who departed this life May 28, 1808, aged 45 years. 

Tiiis tribute to fraternal affections 

erected by their brother, John McArthur. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

John Ijavalin SaTag^, Esq. 

of the Bengal Civil Establishment, 

who whilst in the vigour of youth 

and exercise of every manly virtue, 

was cut off from this world by a malignant 

disorder, on the 30th day of August 1808, 

in the 23d year of his age. 

A most engaging simplicity of manners ; 

Becoming modesty, unshaken constancy 

in friendship ; a warm, true, aud 

high sense of honor ; 

secured to this excellent young man 

the affections of all who knew him. 

In remembrance of his virtues, 

and as a mark of their indelible regret at his death 

his most intimate friends 

have caused this Monument to be erected. 



Here lieth the body of 

Henry l^akeman, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 29th Sept. 1808, 

aged 19 years. 

** Man Cometh up and is cut down like a flower, 

he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never 

continueth in one stay." 

This Monument is erected by an afflicted parent 

lamenting the premature death of a much 

beloved son. 



John l^alker, Esq. 
died on the 18th of October 1808, aged 25 years. 

Here lieth the body of 

Henry Swinlioe, Esq. 

Attorney at Law, 

who departed this life on the 27th Oct. 1808, 

aged 56 years and 3 months. 

He ever proved himself a virtuous man, 

a tender husband, and a most indulgent father. 

This Monument is erected to his Memory, 

by his afflicted wife, Jane Swinhoe. 

Also of Mrs. Jane Swinhoe, 

relict of Henry Swinhoe, 

who departed this life 22d Feb. 1835, 

aged 77 years and 4 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of James Brice, Es^q. 
who departed this life on the 28th of Oct. 1808, 

aged 43 years. 

This tribute of affection and esteem is paid 

in remembrance of his worth and of their loss, 

by an afflicted mother and sister, to whom 

he was endeared by his many virtues 

and amiable qualities. 

Major €leorg^ Doipmle, 

died 4th December 1808, aged 47 years. 

A character every way creditable to 

human nature, if honest, if purity of principle, 

filial and fraternal affection, 

a conscious discharge of his public and private 

duties, if charity, and the practice of every virtue 

that enobles the character of a man, 

merit the kingdom of Heaven, 

the living only have to lament his premature 

death. 



To the Memory of Mr. Samuel Paterson, 

who departed this life the 4th day of Dec. 1808, 

aged 39 years, 3 months and 21 days. 

A very worthy man, and much regretted by all 

who knew him. 



94 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



To the Memory of Gcorf^e Svaiui, 
of the H. C. Pilot Service, 
who departed this life on the 
4th December, 1808, aged 40 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. J. B. Reeves, 

who departed this life April 15, 1809, 
aged 45 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs Sarah Celia Doncaa, 

widow of the late Robert Duncan, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 17th of April 1809, 

aged 48 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

M r. Thomas Andrews, 

late Post Master of Diamond Harbour, 

who departed this life 3d July 1809. 

With fioreas blasts and stormy winds, 
I was tossed to and fro ; 
By God's decree from danger free 
I'm harbour'd here below. 
Where at an anchor I do ride 
WMth numbers of the fleet, 
Until again I do set sail 
My admir^ Christ to meet. 

As also one daughter 

and two sons of the above ; viz. 

Catharine, 

Obit. 16th Sept. 1804, iEt. 8 months. 

WiUiam, 

Obit. 20th Oct. 1806, iEt. 6 days. 

Henrj, 
Obit. 9th January 1809, i£t. 5 days. 



Elisabeth Bmma Tagrlor, 

wife of James Taylor, Esq. 
Attorney to the Honorable East India Company, 
Calcutta, died the 31st July 1809, aged 35 years. 

In the Memory of matchless virtues of 

Airs. Ann O'Brien, 

who died the 3d of August 1809, aged 44 years. 

This humble Monument is erected by her 

sorrowing children. 

With blissful extacy to realms of light. 

Her chaste, her spotless soul, has wing*d its flight, 

In rapt'rous strains her humble voice to raise. 

And chauut with seraph choirs her Maker's praise. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain Charles Eggleston, 

who died at Calcutta on the 10th of Sept. 1809, 

and in the fifty .seventh year of his age. 

Esteemed and respected, 

in an extensive circle, and much r^retted 

as an honest man, a warm friend, 
a dutiful son, and an affectionate brother. 



To the Memory of 
Mrs. Ann fillertony 
who departed this life October 7th, 1809, 
aged 25 yean. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

M rs. Mary Denty, 

daughter of T. K. Fuller, Esq. 

Obit. 19th October 1809, Mt. 27 years. 

Mary Itlcolaon, 

wife of Mr. Simon Nicolson, 

Assistant Surgeon, Calcutta, 

died 17th November 1809, aged 30 years. 



MR. CHARLES WESTON, 

The son of the Recorder of the Mayor's Court, was bom in Calcutta in 1731, in a house then 
opposite to where the Tiretta Bazar now stands. He witnessed the great storm and inundation of 
1737, as it compelled his family to quit their house. The steeple of the Church he states to have 
fallen prostrate. The houses of Uie Europeans in Calcutta, at tliat time were surrounded with spacious 
gardens in which they stood central. This gentleman was the friend and associate of Mr. Holwell, 
and carried arms as a militia-man at the Old Fort, in 1756. He was the founder of his own opulence ; 
surely fortune never bestowed wealth better than on Charl^ Weston, a striking and *»*!sting ex- 
ample, that chaste and refined sentiments are not confined to complexion or climate. This truly hono- 
rable man resided at Chinsurah, amid a group qf necessitous people ^ soothed ond suppihrted by his 
bounty. Those who had seen better days and on whom fortune had ceased to smile, were comforted 
by Charles Weston. One hundred gold mohurs and upwards a month was regularly distributed to 
the indigent, from a box placed on his taMe ; nor was there any Sircar to deduct or intervene ; all 
came from his own venerable hand. He left a sum of about a lac of Rupees, the interest of 
which is still distributed monthly by the vestry of St. John's, to a large number of the poor of 
Calcutta and Chinsurah. 

The following Inscription is taken from his Monument : — 



Sacred to the Memory of Charles l^eston, 

who departed this life on the 25th Dec. 1809, 

in the 78th year of his age. 

A life protracted to an unusual length, 

he marked by an inostentatious life of 

benevolence and charity, 

seldom equalled, and never yet exceeded 

in British India. 

By the wise economical management of a fortune, 

far from enormous, 

(the product of his own industry, secured by the 

Divine blessing,) 

he was enabled to pour forth streams of 

bounty and mercy. 

He manifested a grateful mind, 

by cherishing in his old age his former 



employer and benefiustor, 

the late Governor Holwell, 

and after living the friend of the destitute, 

the support of the widow and the fatherless,^ 

an ornament to the British name, 

and a blessing to mankind, 

he descended to the tomb amidst the 

tears of the indigent, 

and the lamentations of surviving friends. 

This stone is placed here 

as a tribute of united regard to the Memory of 

a tender and revered grandfather, 
by his affectionate and dutiM granddiilditn. 

Reader! 
This stone is no flatterer ! go, and do thou 

Hktwite, 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



9» 



1 o the Memory of Anna Sophia, 

second daughter of 

Leith Alexander and Mary Davidson, 

who died on the 2l8t Nov. 1809, 

aged 2 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Robert laedliei Esq. 

Barrister at Law, 
who died 24th November 1809, aged G5 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Patrick O'Brien, 

who departed this life 1st Jan. 18 10, aged 21 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mm. Frances Ing&n, 
who departed this life January 4th, 1810, 
aged 24 years. 



To the Memory of Major Qeor|^ Benson, 
who died 7th January 1810, aged 54 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Patrick Moir, R<q. 

who died at Calcutta on the 15th February, 

A. D. 1810, in the 42d year of his age. 

In 1806 he fiUed the office of Secretary 

to Lord Minto, 

at that time Pesident of the Board of 

Commissioners for the affairs of India, 

whom he accompanied to Bengal in the year 1807, 

and was appointed a Commissioner of the 

Court of Request of Calcutta in the same year ; 

a trust which he discharged with integrity, 

assiduity and ability, to the time of his decease. 

His virtues, talents and accomplishments, 

all of the highest order, 

enhanced by a singular simplicity and modesty of 

character, had attracted in an eminent degree 

the esteem and regard of the world. 

His gentle and cheerful manners, 

his benevolent and warm affections, 

endeared him to numerous friends, 

whose tender but sorrowful recollections 

will long survive him. 

He lived respected and beloved, 

and died deservedly and universally deplored. 

Soft on thy tomb shall soft remembrance shed. 
The warm but unavailing tear ; 
And purple flowers that grace the virtuous dead, 
Shall strew the lov'd and honor'd bier. 



1 o (he Memory of Capt. San&nel Gonrlay, 
who died 19th January 1810, aged 32 ^ears. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Patrick Connel, 

who departed this life 10th Feb. 1810, 

aged 50 years. 

Also his wife, Mrs. Mari^aret Connel, 

who departed this life 7th Sept. 1810, 

aged 50 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Robert laister, 

Many years senior Branch Pilot in the 

Honorable Company's Marine of Calcutta, 

who departed this life on the 11th March 1810, 

aged 55 years. 

He was a man of great perseverance 

in his professional line, 

an d always successful in it upwards of 27 years. 



In Memory of 

^OITilliam Simpson, Esq. 

who died on the 12th of August MDCCXC. 

aged XXIX. years. 

Also to the Memory of 

Qeorg^ Ang^QStus Simpson, Esq. 

who died on the 23d of March MDCCCXI. 

Aged XXXIV. 

To the Memory of Alexander Raitt, 
who departed this life the twelfth of May 1810, 

aged 61 years. 



In remembrance of an affectionate wife, 

the mother of four children, 

Mrs. Ann RiloTV 

who'after a lingering and painful Umess of 9 months 

which she bore with exemplary patience, 

departed this life on the 13th May 1810, 

resting her hopes of a joyful resurrection 

on the merit and mediation of her Redeemer ; 

aged twenty-one years and two months. 



Sacred to the Memory of a beloved child, 
Andrew Black, 
who departed this life on the 31st May 1810, 

aged 1 year, 1 1 months and 22 days. 
** When Christ, who is my life shall appear, 
then shall 1 also appear with him in glory." 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Master Daniel MorreU, 

died 3rd June 1810, aged 17 months and 28 days. 



This stone is placed by 

G. T. Gibson, over the remains of 

Robert BLnoz, 

who died much and deservedly lamented, 

on the 6th day of June 1810, aged 20 years. 

Humane, generous and just. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

an Armenian Christian, 

who departed this life on the 6th of June 1810, 

aged 26 years and 4 months. 



To the Memory of the infant daughter of 
Charles Buller, 
bom June 25th 1810, died June 27th, aged 2 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mari^aret, 

wife of G. T. Gibson, 

who at the early age of 17 years was taken 

from the bosom of an affectionate family, on the 

15th July 1810. Gentle, ingenious and good. 



To the Memory of John Oonder, 

who died 19th July 1810, aged 40 years. 

This Monument was erected by his friend, 

Richard Watkins. 



"iSr 



96 



SOXTTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Muster Jas. Thoa. Sherwood. 

who departed thU life Aug. 7, 1810, aged 28 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Berrie (Gordon Adams, 

son of Gordon and Jane Adams, 

who departed this life the 27th of August 1810, 

aged 4 years, 3 months and 9 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Gkorg^e Saxon, 

bom at Bartypoorah on the 13th Sept. 1796, 
and departed this life in Calcutta the 3rd Oct. 
1810, aged 24 years and 20 days. 
'* I am the resurrection and the life, saith the 
Lord; he that believeth in me though he were 
dead yet shall he live ; And whosoever Uveth and 
believeth in me shall never die." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Major Joaepli Fletcher, 
who departed this life on the 22d of Sept. 1810, 

aged 44 years. 



Captain J. R. Mockler, of Cavalry, 
died the 3rd November 1810, aged 39 years. 



Here lies the body of Mrs Charlotte Scott, 

wife of Mr. Thomas Scott, 

Examiner, Police Department, 

who died 13th December 1810, aged 23 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Sleanora Jonea, 

Lady of Robert Jones, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 14th Dec. 1810, 

aged 35 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Master T. H. Baldiriiu 

who died 15th December 1810, 

aged 7 years and 10 months. 

His father's pleasure and his mother's pride 
Belov'd he Liv'd, much lamented died. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Francea RoUi&i^, 
who departed this Ufe on the 19th Dec. 1810, 
aged 23 years. 

A tender parent, an.d a sincere friend, 
Lov'd in her life, and lamented in her end. 



To the Memory of John Bell, 
who departed this life February 27th, 1803, 
aged 2 years and 8 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Marj Ann Bell, 

who departed this life 

on the 30th of December 1810, aged 49 years. 

She was possessed of those virtues 

which adorn the sex, 

and whose loss will ever be lamented by an 

affectionate husband and family. 



1'o the Memory of VfT, B. Birch, 

fifth officer of the ship ** Lady Lushington, 
who departed this life January 8th 1811, 
aged 16 years. 



»» 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Oatharine Chraene, 

whose exemplary discharge of her ■ereral 

duties to her Grod, 

to her family, and to society, 

eminently entitled her to respect in the world ; 

and it is humbly and devoutly hoped, 

has secured to her eternal life and bliss, 

** Where sickness, pain and sorrow cannot enter." 

She died on the 20th January 1811,aged32 years. 



Near this stone are deposited the remafais of 

Anne Thomaa Charter, 

who died Jan. 21st 1811, aged 8 months. 

By these lines her bereaved parents 

wish to perpetuate her Memory, 

which will be ever dear to them. 



To the Memory of 
Charlotte Maria Bruce, 

daughter of the Honourable Charles 
and Charlotte Bruce. Obit. 28th January 1811, 
i£tat 5 yeaH, 3 months and 4 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Sir Alexander Seton, Bart 
who departed this life 4th Febmary 1811, 
aged 38 years. 



In Memory of Anthony Dison, 
third son of the Revd. llios. Dixon, 
Late Rector of Yarum, Yorkshire, (England,) 
born 31st Nov. 1784, and died 2d April 1811 ; 
much lamented by his rdations and friends. 



Helen Elisabeth, the infant daufrhter of 

C. G. Biagrave, Esq. died April the 18th, 1811, 

aged 9 months and 4 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Oeorve Harry nardy. 

who died the 8th of Jan. 1811, aged 2o yean. 

" I have heard a voice from heaven saying onto 
me, write, from henceforth blessed are the dead 
which die in the Lord ? Even so saith the Spirit, 
for they rest from their labours." Rev. ziv : 13. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Master Jamea Edward Hamburgh, 

a beloved child, 

who was bom the 29th September 1810, 

and died the 8th Sept 1811. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
the beloved child of W. W. West, 
and Harriet, his wife : 
Bom 29th Nov. 1836, died 23d Feb. 1844. 



Sacred to the Memory of H. Q. A. Howa, 

Deputy Commissary of Ordnance, 

who departed this life 2d October, 1811, 

aged 70 years. 

''Can stony 'd um, or animated bust, 
" Back to its mansion call the fleeting breath? 
" Can honor's voice provoke the silent dust, 
" Or flattery sooth the dull cold ear of death?*' 



To the Memory of Captain Peregrine 
late of the country service, who departed Uiis' 
Ufe on the 8th of October 1811, ag»i 32 years. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



%7 



To the Memory of 

Hnffh H. Parkins, £sq.» 

who died the 14th of November 1811, 

aged 43 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Ann, dauf^hter of 

Alexander and Elizabeth Rogers, 
born 12th August 1794, died 6th Nov. 1811. 

Sacred to the M emory of 
Major Henrj l^fTUkuui Hicks, 
llthR<^. N. I. 
Obit. 6th January 1812, aged 50 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Elisa Green, 

who departed this life the 7th January 1812, 

aged 37 years. 

This Monument is erected by her 

disconsolate husband, Capt. James Green, 

of the country service, 

as a tribute due to thie best of women, 

a fond wife, and a tender mother. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Major 1^. ^V. Kitchen, 
who departed this life on the 18th February 1812, 

aged 38 years. 

He has left a wife and three children 

ever to lament his loss. 



Here lies the remains of Sarah Aan Newton, 

Daughter of D. Newton, Esq. of Bombay, who 

died the 16th of May, 1812, aged 17 years. 

Erected to her Memory, by her sincere friends. 
Captain and Mrs. Jas. McCarthy. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Samnel Zrwin, 

late Branch Pilot 

of the Honorable Company's Marine, 

who departed this life on the 15th May, 1812, 

aged 40 years. 



To the Memory of Henry Edward Clraham, 

who died on the 19th of February 1812, 

aged 13 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Tabitha, 
wife of Quarter Master Robert Belcher, 

of H. M. 24th Regiment, 

who departed this life 20th March 1812, 

aged 33 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Maria Ann Johnson, 

who departed this life on the 22d April 1812, 
aged 12 years, 8 ms. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Robert Smillie, Cabinet maker, 

who departed this life on tlie 

third day of May 1812, aged 35 years. 

He was a dutiful husband and a good member 

of society ; his loss was severely felt by his 

disconsolate widow and a numerous circle 

of surviving friends. 



In Memory of 

Two infant sons of Lieut. W. Nott. 

Henry Swinhoe, died 26i\i May 1812, 

aged 2 years, 4 months, and 13 days. 

John, 
died 7th September 1812, aged 7 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. John Hassin, 

late Head Constable at the Police, 

who departed this life, 

the 29th day of May 1812, aged 49 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut. Colin Mackensie, 

of H. M. 78th Regt., who departed this life, 

on the 7th of June 1812, aged 27 years. 

Deeply regretted by a numerous circle of friends^ 

whom his amiable disposition had acquired. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elisabeth Haynes, 

who departed this life, 
the 11th of June 1812, aged 58 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Mary Jane Ross, 

who departed thi« life on the 29th August 1812, 

aged 36 years, 7 months and 1 5 days. 

On whom were united in an eminent degree all 

the virtues of a pious wife, 

a tender and affectionate mother. 

She has left a disconsolate husband, and three 

children to lament her loss. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Master Ajidrsw laister, 

eldest son of the late Mr. Robert Lister, 

many years senior Branch Pilot, 

of the Honorable Company's Marine, Calcutta, 

who departed this life the 6th of May 1812, 

aged 16 years and 6 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

James Barton, Esq. 

of the H. C. Civil Service on this Establishment, 

who departed this life the 8th day of May 1812, 

aged 36 years and 6 months. 

Master Joseph Stansbnry, 
died 9th May 1312, aged 8 months 14 days. 
I>ord I am grieved but I resign 

To thy superior will ; 
Tis grace, 'tis wisdom, all divine, 
Appoints the grief I feel. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Miss Anne Cooper, 

who departed this life on the 3 1st August 1812, 

aged 18 years, 9 months and 24 days. 

Secrcd to the Memory of Mr. John Cooper, 

who departed this life 19th September 1821, 

aged 62 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Catharina laouisa liarkins, 

who died at Calcutta on tlie 2l8t of September 

1812, in the 32nd year of her age. 
In the several relations of daughter, wife and 
mother ,the conduct of the deceased during the 
short period of her appointed existence on earth, 

was uniformly meritorious, 

for the early loss of worth thus various. A lof^s, 

embittered by tlie precious decease 

of a beloved infant, whose remains 

are adjacently interred. 

I.»anguage can but unadequately express 

the grief of the afflicted husband, 
who inscribes this stone, J. P. Larkins. 



98 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Jolin laiflh, 

who departed this life on the 13th October 1812, 

aged 51 years. 

This Epitaph is inscribed 

by his affectionate wife Elizabeth Lish. 

In the Memory of 
Lieut. Joseph Ferrui, 

of 11. M. 24th Regiment of Foot, 

second son of Joseph Ferris, Esq. 

of Truro, in Cornwall ; 

who died the 14th October 1812, aged 28 years. 

This stone is erected by his brother officers 

in testimony of his merit and their esteem. 



The infant daughter of Capt. Charles Coort, 
born on the 30th and died on the 31st Oct. 1812. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Robert Mason, 

late Purser of the Honorable Company's 

ship •* Baring," 

who departed this life 24th Nov. 1812, 

aged 37 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Slisa Smith, 

Wife of John Furgusson Smith, Esq. 

who departed this life 3rd January 1813, 

aged 17 years and 5 months. 

Affection's last sad tribute. 



Sacred lies interred here the infant son of 
Robert and Charlotte Allan, 
bom 27th, and died 29th January, A. D. 1813. 



Quia desiderio sit pudorant modus 

Tarn chari capiti<(. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieutenant Charles Soott ^Varing', 

Adjutant to the Body Guard of 

The Right Honorable the Governor General, 

Obit. 2d Feb. 1813. JEtat. 26. 

His cheerful disposition, conciliatory manners, 

and unaffected simplicity of character ; 

endeared him to his relatives and friends, 

and acquired him the regard of all who knew him. 

While his conduct in his profession, 

obtained him the public applause, 

and private regard of his noble patron ; 

who represented him where most he 

was emulous of being known, 

as a youth of the first promise. 

Past are those hopes, closed are those views 

which promised to realize his moderate desires ; 

and which opening bright prospects to his 

relatives and friends ; now spread a deeper 

gloom over his sad loss. 



Sacred to the Memory of Ziewis Grant, 

who departed this life on the 3rd day of March 
A. D. 1813, aged 3d years. 

His early death involves in grief severe, 
A loving partner and five infants dear. 
The former while she mourns her widowM fate. 
Beholds the latter and laments their state. 
Too soon, Alas ! deprived of their best guide 
They're left to traverse life's inconstant tide. 
But tho* with perils their conditions fraught, 
To rest on God their little hearts are taught, 
And deeply as their loss they do deplore 
They trust for safety in Uis mercies store. 



Here lies the body of 

James Arden Gkird<iay 

bom the 27th of October A. D. 1811, 

died the 27th of January 1813, aged 15 months. 

Of such are the kingdom of Heaven. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. lUehard IXTelsh, 
1st Officer of the country ship Eliza. Obit. 31st 
March 1813, iEtat. 23 years. 
The death of this young man was occasioned 
by a fatal explosion of three barrels of gunpow. 
der, near Mayapore, on Friday the 19th March 
1813. 



Sacrtd to the Memory of Mr. Ottorre Silrerloek, 
2d Officer of the country ship Euza, Obit, the 

26th March 1813, JEt. 16 years. 
This unfortunate youth was in Company with 
Mr. Welsh, the time of the explosion ; whose re- 
mains are interred by his side. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Bobsrt Atkins, 
late Branch Pilot of the H. C. M. who departed 

this life April the 13th 1813, aged 51 years. 

And also six of his infant children that lays near 

this spot. Afflictions sore long time he bore, 

Physicians strove in vain, God did please that 

death should come and ease him of his pain. 



Sacred to the Memory of Ann, wife of R. Panliog, 

who left this for a better world the 23d April 

1813, aged 32 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mary — t-t, 

wife of Captain Charles Court, Mar. Snrveyor 

General ; and eldest daughter of (Seorge Sowley 

Holroyd, Esq. Barrister of Gray's Inn, who 
departed this life on the 14th of May, A. D. 1813, 

aged 24 years. 
If worth were to be esteemed by the unspeakable 

grief of a disconsolate husband, and the deep 

and unfeigned grief of all who had the happiness 

of her acquaintance, her's would rank h^h 

indeed ; but Alas ! she has fled from erring human 

judgment to that tribunal which alone can 

duly appreciate the mild and gentle virtues 

which adorned her amiable mmd. 



Sacred to tlie Memory or Jane Oaikariney 

the infant daughter of Lieut. Edward Browne, 

13th N. I. who died on the 20tb May 1813, 

aged 11 months. 

To the Memory of Catharine Ann Sinipson, 

bom 15th December 1812, and departed this 

life on the 20th June 1813. 



To the Memory of Oharles, the son of 
Thomas and Ann Gillanders, who died the 2l8t. 
June 1813, aged 4 years, 2 months, and 17 days. 

In Memory or Mrs. Ann Oreichtony 

who died the 3d of July 1813, aged 43 yean. 

This is inscribed by her sons Thomas, Edward, 

William Douglas and James Norman Creighton 

in gratitude to the best of mothers. 

Sacred to the Memory of M rs. ZSUsab^th Jessnpi 

who departed this life on the 25th of August 

1813, aged 68 years. 

To the Memory of BUsabeth K«ar, 
daughter of Mr. T. H. Metcalfis, Obit 7th Sep- 
tember 1813, ML 4 years, 1 month and 18 days. 
*' Of such is the kingdom of Heaven." 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



99 



Sacred to the Memory of Marj Ctouldhawke, 

who departed this transitory Ufe and *' shuffled 

off this mortal coil," on the 30th day of October 

1813, in the fullest hopes, thro' the merits of 

her blessed Redeemer, to enter into the mansion of 

everlasting bliss ; aged 49 years. 

Leaving her disconsolate husband and alsQ her 

son to bewail her loss. 

All is vanity. 

What tho' we now lament and mourn 

Her mortal frame shall ne'er return 

That's gone alas ! for evermore, 

Let then our consolation be 

To meet her in eternity, 

*' She is not lost, but gone before," 

Let us, my son, in God put all our trust. 

And know that in His sight all flesh is dust. 

This last and sorrowful tribute marks the grave of 

Mrs. Marg^aret Kinsey, 

who, if thou knowest her, best can judge 

Resigned her spirit to God on Dec. the 6th, 1813, 

aged 21 years and 10 months. 

To the Memory of Henry IUslilei|fb, £iq. 

late second officer of the H. C.'s ship Tottenham ; 

who dq)arted this life at Calcutta, Dec. 18th, 1813, 

aged 24 years, and seven months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. John Anglos McLean, 

who departed this life on the 30th Dec. 1813, 

aged 49 years, 3 months, and 2 days. 

And his infant daughter Jane, who died on the 

25th April 1812, aged 3 years and 5 months. 

Long time with sickness he lay sure opprest 

Kind death has eas'd him, he lies here at rest. 



Sacred to the Memory of Marian D'Oyly, 
the wife of Charles D'Oyly 
of the H. C. Civil Service. 
In life she was equally distinguished for the 
elegance and mildness of her manners ; the 
extensive endowments of her mind and, the 
affectionate benevolence of her heart. 
Adorned with every virtue and accomplishment 
that can dignify our nature, she was suddenly 
snatch'd from this transitory world beloved by all 
who knew her, on the 9th day of January A. D. 
1814, in the 35th year of her age. 



Sacred to the Memory of SUxa Daviea, 
died 11th Jan. 1814, aged 2 years and 10 mouths. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Herbert Colebrooke, 

died 17th Feb. 1814, aged 1 year and 9 months. 

Interred Mary Adams, dauprhter of 
James Cousins, Esq. Penang Civil Service ; 
died the 25th March 1814, aged 1 year, 11 montlis. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Master Henry layona Perciral, 

who departed this life on the 21st Apnl 1814, 
aged 3 months and 20 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. B. A. F. C. Smith, 

wife of Lieut. Smith, H. M. 24 Infantry ; 
who departed this life the 5th June 1814, 
aged 37 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Knsn. Duffy Swinton, 
who died the 8th of August 1814, aged 23 years. 



To the INIemory of Lieut. Joseph Greene, 

25th Regiment Bengal Native Infantry. Nt^phew 

of Major Anthony Greene ; who died the 21st 

August 1814, aged 25 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mtater John Triat, 
bom 14th Sept. 1811, died 24th Oct. 1814. 

James Smyth, Esq. age<i 23 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

M rs. Hannah ^ITiUiams, 

Aged 30 years. Sincerely regretted by all 

her friends. 



In Memory of Thomas Munsavir, 

a faithful servant and an honest man. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
David IVedderbnm Mackensie, 

Comet in his Majesty's 8th Light Dragoons, son 
of John and Elizabeth Mackenzie ; who departed 
this life on the 29th Dec. 1814, aged 21 ye^rs. 

Sacred to the Memory of Qeorg^e Morison E'<|. 
who died the 19th Jan. 1815, aged 36 years. 



LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ROBERT KYD— (Late Miiitart/ Secretary to the Govemmeni 

of Be^igal.J 

A character distinguished for Botanical researches, to whom India, and the neighbourhood of 
Calcutta, in particular, is indebted for many valuable and curious plants. To the Memory of this gen- 
tleman a beautiful Marble Um, sculptured by Mr. Banks, has been erected in the centre of the 
Honorable Company's Botanical Garden. His remains lie interred in the old burial ground, under an 
oblong square of masonry level with the ground, to the right after you enter into the gate. He died 
on the 27th May 1793. 



DR JOHN ADAM. 

John Adam was of a good famQy in Forfarshire, North Britain. He was bom at Forfar, in 
January 1792, and was the eldest son of a respectable Surgeon, who had served in tlie medical staff of 
the British army, both at home and abroad, and afterwards settled in private practice at Forfar. He 
received the early part of his education at a private school in his native town, as well as at the Grammar 
fechool of Dundee, and in the year 1807, at the age of fourteen he became a student at Mareschol College, 
Aberdeen. There he resided two terms under the special charge of his relative, Bishop Skinner, an ac- 
complished scholar, who directed his young friend's studies chiefly to the higher classics, and the 
elemenUry portions of Chemistry and Natural History, branches of knowledge for which he entertained 
a strong predilection. 

Dr. Adam appears to have experienced an intuitive and strong attraction towards a particular calling, 
and the history of his career proves that he made a proper and a wise choice. 

o 2 



745669 A 



100 SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 

Brought up in liis fatlier's houi«c, and accustomed from childhood to t)ie detaili of a Dispensary, he 
acquired in prescription and in surgical, no less than pharmacentical manipulation, a precocioui facility 
which was quite remarkable. 

During his second rectus of the college, when sixteen years old, he was in medical charge of a regi- 
ment of local Militia, where he displayed such taste and sagacity that he never found it reqaisite to 
consult anybody. 

In the autumn of the same year, 1809, he proceeded to. Edinburgli, where he matriculated for the 
first time in November. The chairs of the University during the terms of his studies there, were filled 
by Professors eminently distinguished in the annals of general and medical science. 

In 1812, he passed Surgeon's Hall, and soon after passed examination before the Army Medical 
Board in London, and was gazetted as an Hospital Assistant to the forces, in June of the same year ; 
his views being directed towards active service in the Peninsula, circumstances however occurred whidi in- 
duced him to abandon all idea of the army. He accordingly resigned his commission, became a member 
of the Royal College of Surgeons, London, and in the beginning of November, proceeded to Edinbnrgfa 
for the purpose of further prosecuting his studies, with the view of taking his degree in Physic 

In May 1814, he returned for the last time to the University of Edinburgh, and passed his examina- 
tions as a candidate for the summi honores medicinae with great credit. He ere long discovered, how- 
ever, that the sphere of a country practitioner did not harmonize with his ambition. Accordingly he final- 
ly left Scotland in 1816, for London. During his residence in the capital, he renewed his study of Natur- 
al History, and was a constant visiter at the British Museum. 

In 1817, he received the appointment of Assistant Surgeon in the Bengal Presidency, and proceeded 
to India the same year. On his arrival in July, after the customary routine of attendance at tlie 
General Hospital, he proceeded up the country attached to the Military branch of the Medical Service. 
In all situations he served with uniform credit to himself, receiving the cordial approbation of his su- 
periors. — In the course of the Military part of his service, he had good opportunities of witnesoni: the 
diseases of the camp, and the details of medical duty with native and European troops. The experi- 
ence and information that he thus acquired must have afterwards proved of great use to him when 
Secretary to the Medical Board. 

Dr. Adam's views now became directed to the Presidency. In 1820, through the kind office of the 
Governor General Atfam, his wishes were accomplished by his being appointed one of the permanent 
Assistant Surgeons at the General Hospital. In 1824, he exchanged appointments with a fHend, who 
took his place at the General Hospital, and he became Assutant Marine Surgeon a situatioo wiiich has 
nothing to recommend it, but the position in which it places the Medical Officer, with reAnreooe to pri- 
vate practice, in which Dr. Adam was now becoming extensively engaged. 

An object which he had long at heart was the formation of a Society in which medical men could 
unfold their views and the result of their mutual experience. Dr. Adam finding that there were a few me- 
dical friends at the Presidency who fully concurred with him as to the great utility of such an institotioD, a 
communication was opened on the subject with the late Dr. Jas. Hare. On Dr. Adam, as the Secretary, by 
far the most onerous share of labour fell, but it was to him " a labour of love.'' In 1825, he was selected 
by Lord Amherst to fill the important and responsible situation of Secretary to the Medical Board. 

In all the above respectable grades of Medical Service of the Blast India Company, he performed his 
various duties with credit to himself and honor to his profession. While at the General Hospital, he always 
made it a point to show the kindest attention to young Medical Officers joining the service. His house was 
ever open to those of his brethren arriving from time to time at the Presidency, who most required such 
friendly attention. In his demeanor towards the sick, no matter how lowly was their state, there was 
an unaffected solicitude and quiet benevolence of manner, that won their confidence and affection. 

Respecting his private character. The warmth of his heart, the agreeableness of his manners, and 
the playfulness of his humour, together with the gentle frankness and the honesty of his nature, 
endeared him to his friends. Whatever secret cares might be weighing on his mind, the cfaeerfolness 
and serenity, which are such winning features of character, and give such zest to neighbourly and social 
communion, never forsook him. He was therefore uniformly the same amiable and animated being, tiie 
same kindly-disposed and delightful companion. 

It only now remains to notice with becoming briefness, the melancholy circumstances of his last 
illness and death. Towards the end of the first week in July 1830, Dr. Adam, whose health had been 
in an unsatisfactory state for some time previous, was seized with ardent fever, which continued without 
remission or much abatement till the 26th of the month, when hoematemesis and dysenteric pni^ging 
supervened, which in three days put a period to his valuable life. Fully sensible of his danger, yet not 
despairing of recovery, he settled all his worldly affairs within the first three or four days of Us ill- 
ness, and then with tranciuil resignation awaited the issue. During the last week of his iUness, he 
expressed a desire to converse on spiritual subjects with the Rev. Principal Mills of Bishop's College. 
That gentleman made all the haste in his power to see his sick friend, but his house being at a consi- 
derable distance from Calcutta some delay necessarily ensued, and when he arrived it was too late. 
That intellect which was once so clear and unclouded was now dimmed by the mist of ^>pnMidung 
dissolution, and on the morning of the 29th July, he ceased to live. 

The Monument erected over his grave, bears the following inscription : — 

To the Memory of John Adam^ £8q. M. D. 
Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, London, Surgeon m the Service of the II. E. I. Company, 

and Secretary to the Medi^ Board, Bengal. 

This Momument is erected by the Members of the Medical and Physical Society of Calcutta, 

as a mark of their esteem for his public and private worth and their sense of his service 

as Associate and Secretary from the formation of the Society (in which he was mainly instramentsl) 

to the period of Us premature and lamented decease. Bom at For&r, A. D. 1792, 

died in Calcutta July 29th 1830, in the 38th year of his sge. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 101 

THE LATE MR. BRANCH PILOT SINCLAIR. 

Mr. Patrick Qeorg^ Sinclair entered the Pilot service in the year 1798, at a time when it was 
recruited by any casual means, instead of, as it is now, being composed of men of respectable family 
and of good education selected by the Court of Directors. Mr. Sinclair therefore, in the coarse of hi» 
gervice, had witnessed an organic change in the body to which he belonged ; a change which has work- 
ed as great a difference in the character, deportment, and value of the service, as it is well possible to 
conceive. From being as a body, subject, but too justly, to reproach, the Pilots of the Port may 
now challenge any body of men for general worth, integrity and character. 

Mr. Sinclair has had the merit of passing through both these stages, not only without reproach, but 
with the highest character and credit in every respect. Under the old, as under tlie new regime, he 
was erer distinguished by a steadiness, zeal, ability and honesty of purpose that would have done 
honour, to any individual in any situation of life. 

Under the late change in the constitution of the Service, he had secured and retained to the last, the 
respect and esteem of all its younger members, as well of those nearer his own standhig, while he had 
always enjoyed the unabated conlidence and regard of all his superiors. In the rank of Senior Branch 
Pilot, employed in the general aid of the duties of the department, as connected with the Pilotage of the 
River, he has been unwearied in his exertions, and his death may be attributed to them. He left 
Calcutta in perfect health, and with every prospect of long continuing to add to his claims in the 
department by the exercise of his useful talents, on the 8th September 1836, for the purpose of 
dtfsorily examining Channel Creek, hi connection with the projected Harbour and Railroad from that 
place. On the 9th he was attacked with fever and ague, but proceeded down the river ; he was, however, 
obliged to return to town, where he arrived on the morning of tlie 14th, and landed free from fever. 
In die course of the day it returned, and finally caused his death at half past eleven p. m. on the 15th. 

One of the last acts of his long and useful public career was that of saving the lives of the crew 
and paaaengera of the late ship Windsor, He was about that time employed in the Eastern Channel in 
laying a Buoy, and so arranged his movements, that he might be up in the Gasper Channel, when that 
iil-fiited ship would be passing through in order that he might, if necessary, render her assistance. 
Tliat act was his own, and the result showed how well-judged and considerate was his determination ; 
without it, every individual on board the ship would in all probability have perished. He was in com- 
mand, mild, yet firm in his conduct to those placed under his orders, while to those above him he was 
nniformly respectful and obedient. 

Uia dMth will long be felt as a public loss in the department in which for 38 years he had served 
widi honor and credit to himself and with great advantage to the public service. 

(The following itucription it on his tomb : — J 

Sacred to the Memory of Patrick Qeora^e Sinclair, Esq. 
Senior Branch Pilot H. C. B. M. who departed this li^ on the 15th September 1836, 

aged 53 years and 22 days. 
Mr. S. was much esteemed by his superiors, for his long and faithful ser\'iccs of 38 years, and univer- 
sally respected by those who served under him. He united in his person all that could command 
rq^ard and excite admiration. A mind more generous, a heart more pure and a disposition more amiable 
than his could not exist — added to these qualities he was a most affectionate father, a kind husband, 

and a sincere and warm friend. 

** Weep not for me, lament no more, 
I am not lost but gone before.'' 



Sacred to the INTegiory of Slixabeth Jane, 
ddest daughter of Patrick George and Elizabeth Sinclair, who departed this life on the 2d Feb. 1829, 

aged 11 years, 4 months 8 days. 

*' Hie Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, blessed be the name of the Lord.*' — Job. 1 — 21. 
'* And all wept and bewailed her, but he said weep not, she is not dead but sleepeth." — Luke viii. 52. 

MR. W. F. CLARK. 

Mr. WiUiam Fairlie Clark came to India in the Hon'ble Company's Bengal Civil Service, and 
afterwards joined ihe firm of Fergusson and Co., and continued a partner many years until the time of 
ttiilifliire. 

Mr. Clark was a gentleman of retired, and of a most amiable character, highly esteemed by the 
wcircantik community. 

(The following inscription is on his tomb : — ) 

Sacred to the Memory of IVilliam Fairlie Clark, Esq. 
who died in Calcutta September the 23rd 1835, aged 47 years, 5 months and 25 days. 



JOHN ROSS HUTCHINSON, ESQ,:;-(Late of the Bengal Civil Service.) 

Mr. HnteldiiBon was bom at Stonehaven, North Britain, on tlie 29th June 1792, and very early 
^ %3Se had the misfortune to lose his father ; he followed the usual elementary course observed in Scottbh 
^^^lools, while his moral and religious education was under the vigilant superintendance of an excellent 
^<^ther, whom his own fond pen has recorded, as the kindest, gentlest, tenderest parent, that ever lived. 
^^^ 1806 be was sent to school at Aberdeen, where, after remaining some time, he received intimation 



102 SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 

of hU having, through the exertions of his maternal uncle, been appointed to a Bengal Writership. A 
provision of this kind is, to the friends of the party, truly an anxious blessing. It satisfies the present 
corroding anxiety for the son, or the brother, and takes otf the edge of the passing exigency, but it has 
no talismanic charm to avert the painful solicitude of the future or to lesson the weight of the doubts 
and misgivings of separation that may be for all time. 

Leaving the College of Hertford in May 1810, the subject of this memoir sailed for India in the 
following month. He arrived in Calcutta in December, 1810. Mr. Hutchinson intently applied himself 
to the cultivation of the oriental languages, and with such effect, that in about seven months he passed 
hLs examination at Fort William ; and was appointed immediately afterwards to Allighur, whence he 
wais directed to proceed to Mirzapore, as Register of that station. In the course of 1815, though a very 
young man, he was nominated to officiate as Judge and Magistrate of Mirzapore, and during the period 
of hLs incumbency, the rajah of Burdee, having made a hostile incursion into the district, Mr. Hutchin- 
son accompanied the detachment of troops sent to quell the movement, and after considerable difficulties, 
succeeded in concluding a treaty with the Rajah, which was highly approved of by Lord Hastings, of 
which a very handsome acknowledgment was conveyed to the young functionary, through the medium 
of the late Mr. Adam, then Secretary to Government. He soon acquired the confidence of the 
natives, in illustration of which it is sufficient to ob.serve that when the Governor Greoeral (Lord H.) 
went up the country, and after Mr. Hutchinson had left the station to take a voyage to sea, on account 
of his health, the inhabitants of Mirzapore presented a memorial to his Lordship praying that he might 
be continued permanently in the appointment. 

In 181 G Mr. Hutchinson was compelled by ill health to proceed to the Cape of Good Hope, during 
his sojourn at which place he took that important step in life upon which, at the same time that it 
extends tlie basis of a man's responsibilities, tlie scheme of his purest and most rational enjoyment 
mainly depends. He was singularly fortunate in the object of his choice ; his lady, with whom he had 
spent twenty years of uninterrupted happiness and a family of ten children, survives to deplore the lost 
of a devotedly attached husband, and an exemplary and affectionate father. It would be inconsistent 
with the object of an unpretending sketch like this, to follow the subject of it through the details of 
every situation he held in the public service. Suffice it that in 1821, the writer found him under his 
own hospitable roof, while Judge and Magistrate of Burdwan, at the head of a happy and charming 
family, beloved and reiti)ected as a member of society, and well known and appreciated as a sealous 
and able functionary on whose discretion and experience great reliance might be placed. He remained 
at Burdwan for the following five years, engaged in his official pursuits, and acquiring for himself that 
personal consideration and weight, which a masculine understanding, conjoined with prudence and 
undeviating rectitude, never fail, in due course, to secure for their possessor. In 1829, Mr. Hutchin- 
son was appointed J udge of Goruckpore, which station he joined in April, but a few mondis afterwards 
was nominated to officiate as Commissioner of Benares, in which appointment, after serving for some 
montlis, he returned to Goruckpore. In 1838 his name appeared in orders as Conunissioner for Meerut ; 
where he remained till the end of 1836, when he was gazetted to act as a Judge of Suddo* Dewanny 
Adawlut. From the above simple reference to the situations which he successively held it is sufficiently 
obvious that the value of his services was justly appreciated by the Government ; nor is it assuming 
more than is warranted by prescription and experience to suppose, that had it pleased heaven to prolong 
liis days, he would have obtained still higher office and rank. He had early formed to himself oool and 
active habits of business. Accordingly, as a public officer he became remarkable for the despatdi and 
methodical regularity with which he got through his official labours. His thorough knowledge of die 
subject, combined with these, gave liim a facility in the performance of his duties, that soon made his 
merits known as an enlightened and energetic magistrate. His temperament, no less than the strocture 
of his mind and his ac(|uirements, admirably qualified him for a still more advanced sphme than the 
Magistrates and the Zillah Judges, but where, alas ! it was not doomed that he should long remain. 
Placid, patient, firm, no counteraction put him out, no complexity wearied him ; no subtlety or sophistry 
war)>ed his judgment. To a thorough knowledge of the oriental languages, he added an intimate 
acquaintance with the customs and prejudices of the natives, uo less than a generous ccmaideration for 
their weakness and moral defects. Mr. Hutchinson was of middle height and slender make widi a 
countenance expressive of great intelligence, inclined to a benign gravity. In disposition he was 
cheerful and cordial, with a deal of quiet humour which gave an attraction to his conver8ati<m, whim he 
was on intimate terms with the party. His heart was susceptible of the warmest attachments ; and 
though he had many friends, it does not appeal* tliat he ever lost one. He was imbued witli a love of oar 
great national poets, and often derived solace from them, and also from a taste for drawing, in which, 
with more leisure, he might have excelled. He was a pious man, and his actions were monlded 
habitually by the unostentatious, but deeply seated, and life-giving religion of the heart. It were aAtnt^ 
superfluous after this to add, that he was a most kind and benevolent master, considering hia servanti 
as a part of his family, and taking a lively interest in the promotion of their welfare. That most 
heavy evil, separation from wife and children, peculiar to life in India, and part of the penalty which 
must be paid for a pilgrimage here in ])ursuit of a competency, preyed latterly upon his spirits, moce, 
it is probable, than he chose to avow. A prolonged residence in the climate had undoubtedly affected 
his constitution more seriously than might, to the superficial observer, be obvious, although no intimate 
friend could help perceiving that he began to look pale and thinner than was consistent with his 
average health, a state of things to which the last exhausting hot season, no doubt greatly added. 

The loss of such a man to the public service, is not easily replaced, but to his family and friends is 
irreparable. 

Happy is the death of the righteous man ! The subject of our sketeh was taken ill with the disorder, 
from which he never recovered, on the 2d of September last. He required no intimation of his approach- 
ing end, for he had all along a presentiment of it. He needed no hints about setting his house in 
order ; for that had been well looked to. The deep-rooted and practical piety of his life had fortified 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 103 

him too habitaaUy to be disengaged at the approach of the mortal consummation, and at peace with 
himself and all on earth, and fiXL of confidence in the mediation of the Saviour, and with a clieerful 
resignation to the summons of his Creator, he departed this life on Sunday the 16th of September, 
between nine and ten o'clock at night. 

Tke following inicripiion is erected to hia memory in the South Park Street Burial Ground : — 

Sacred to the Memory of 

John Rosa XZatcliinaon, E<;q. 

of the Bengal Civil Service ; one of the Judges of the Sudder Dewanny and Nizamut 

Adawiut of Bengal, a man who in his life was endowed with a powerful and 

correct judgment ; a stedfast faith in religion and the loftiest principles of integrity. With these 

were happily united a refined taste and a most amiable and affectionate disposition. 

He has left a beloved wife and ten children, besides an extensive circle of 

attached friends to deplore his untimely loss. 

Bom at Stonehaven, N. B. June 29th, 1792 ; died at Calcutta 16th September 1838. 

Requiescat in pace, 

MR. H. L. V. DEROZIO. 

Henrj laovau Virian Deroxio was bom in Calcutta, the 10th of April 1809, and was sent to 
school at the age of six years. His quickness and his progress, soon attracted the attention of his 
master, Mr. David Dnimmond. Derozio was much beloved at school, both by his teachers and his school 
fellows. He commenced his dallyings with the Poetic muse at a very early age. On the occasion of a 
Theatre being established at the school by the boys attached to it, he wrote the prologue, and it is a 
rery rare production, considering the extreme youth of the writer, and the circumstances of his educa- 
tion. Literature was his sole delight, and in it, he most assuredly excelled. The Roman classics and 
the Mathematics never were his favorite pursuits. He had a smattering of both these studies, but he 
was not certainly an adept in either of them. Moral Philosophy was his favorite study, next however 
to Poetry. He left school at the age of fourteen, and immediately entered into business. He served 
for a short time in the Agency House of Messrs. J. Scott and Company, where his father occupied a 
respectable post. But the Cash-book and the Licdger had no charms for him. He resigned this office, 
and placed himself under his Uncle, Mr. Johnson, Indigo Planter, at Bhaugulpore. He found this 
bnsxness more congenial to his temper and his disposition. Country scenes, and mountains and rivers, 
mspired his fancy, kindled his imagination, and awakened poetical feelings in his souL 

Hitherto Derozio had scribbled verses, but he had never submitted them for publication. It was at 
this time that he courted public favor under the signature of*' Juvenis" in the columns of the India 
Gazette, then conducted by Dr. John Grant. The generous Editor fostered literary worth, and 
Derozio flattered and encouraged, poured forth his effusions with singular rapidity, lliese produc- 
tions are not characterized by any great poetical feeling or fancy. There is a glitter of Oriental images 
and a variety of ** smart conceits" in them. They bear testimony to the existence of the poetical 
feeling, but nothing more. They are, to use his own words, *' lines written on the sand," — which the 
swelling tide of his future fame, would have completely washed away, and left in their stead, " costly 
gems and pearls of the ocean,** but it has happened otherwise. The writing is left, and we must be 
content with the evidence it bears to the excellency of the hand that wrote it. It has been said, that 
Derozio might have strung the harp of India to worthier strains than it has emitted, if he were not 
spoUed by flattery, and that the sugar-plums of friends, and a host of admirers, Europeans and East In- 
dians, had entirely vitiated his taste and deteriorated the products of his Muse. It was the fate of poor 
Derozio to be as much bespattered with abuse, and exposed to envy, as he is said to have been court- 
ed and flattered. In the season of his full blown reputation he was one evening going up the steps of a 
house, to which he had been invited by the lady, who was for a long while the distinguished ornament 
of this society, when he heard voices, and he immediately recognized the tones of the gentleman of 
the house, and a poetical friend. He was announced, and these words reached his ear ; " as for Derozio, 
I allow he possesses fancy, but my Khansamah possesses more judgment than he." Derozio turned 
back, and never did he again visit that house. 

"Die great fault with Derozio, was that he was too soon left his own master in the delightful fields of 
literature. He possessed no mentor, whose superior judgment and matured understanding would have 
informed bis intellect, and from the Are of his mind the slender taper of his understanding would have 
borrowed light and life. Derozio gave up his soul to the writings of Moore and Byron, and L. £. L. 
Tlie glittering fancies of the first, like diamonds that sparkle on the person of an Indian king, which 
instead of lighting up the beauty of the countenance by their lustre dazzle the eye and destroy the effect 
of the natural appearance : — the fervent and passionate outpourings of the heart of the second, that 
remind his reader of the arch-fiend, Satan, impiously obstinate and dreadful in Ids revolves, at one time 
uttering horrid imprecations, at another time, breathing the tenderest emotions of wounded feeling and 
a subdued soul : — and the tawdry ornament of the last, like her own Ethel churchill, the heroine of a 
tale, and the poorest personage of tlie whole drama, brooding over her own disappointment, and con- 
veying her wrongs in language not always intelligible : — these were the writers, the pedestals of whose 
fame are the Irish Melodies, Childe Harold, and the Venetian Bracelet, that had pre-occupied his soul, 
and to the bewitching influence of whose writings, he was most irresi&tibly bound. How much better 
for him, had his attention been directed to the volumes of Shakespear and Milton. The delineations of 
human character and passion of the one, and the sober and classic muse of the other, would have con- 
strained him to reflect before he sat down to%rite his thoughts. This check would have been of great 
advantage to the fame and character of his writings. Notwithstanding this objection, his productions 
are remarkable with advertence to the extreme youth of the writer, and the education he had received. 
His acquaintance with man was not extensive, and his knowledge of nature was gathered from the plaius 
of Bhaugulpore and the Rock of Jungheera. 



104 SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 

The unexpected encouragement which Derozio received from the Editor of the India Gazette, in- 
duced him to venture on the publication of his poems. Accordingly he came down to Calcntta from 
Bhaugulpore, in 1826, and hurried his first volume through the press. The reception it met with 
was most flattering and encouraging. In the following year, he not only reprinted his former Tolnme, 
but added another ambitious poem entitled " the Fakeer of Jungheera.'' The plot of this poem is 
extremely threadbare, and the merit of the poet is therefore the greater, inasmnch as he has been able 
to weave so much interest around the hero and fiur heroine of the poem. The two volumes were re- 
ceived by the public with g^eat approbation, and Derozio's fame was supposed by many to be firmly 
established. 

At this time, Derozio obtained an appointment in the Hindu College, as teacher, through the kind 
Assistance of Dr. John Grant, to whom he had dedicated the first volume of his poems. Well might 
it be said of Dr. Grant, that he rocked the cradle of Derozio*s genius and followed its hearse. He 
told the youthful poet, when solicited for permission to inscribe the first volume to him, that he would 
advise the dedication to be made to some more inf^ential person, who could promote his wel£ue in 
life. But Derozio's grateful heart would not permit nim to adopt this counsel. 

His career as a teacher was marked with great success. He opened the eyes of his pupils' under- 
standings. He taught them to reason, and imbued their minds with a taste for poetry and literature. 
His knowledge of moral Philosophy, was somewhat extensive. With great penetration, he led his seholan 
through the pages of Locke, Rcid and Stewart. We do not know whether we can ofler a higher 
testimony to Derozio's Metaphysical acquirements, than the opinion of the Rev. Dr. MiU» hite Principal 
of Bishop's College. He avowed before a large and respectable Meeting, that tiie objections which 
Derozio published to the Philosophy of Rant, were perfectly original and displayed powers of reason- 
ing and observation which would not disgrace even gifted Philosophers. Derozio laboured with great 
zeal for his pupil's inten^ts. He established the first Debating Society among the students of tho Hindu 
College, and delivered a course of Lectures on English Poetry. He was neither a fluent nor an elo- 
quent speaker, but the little that he said, contained bone and sinew, and furnished a large atock of ac- 
curate information. 

Many reasons have been urged in explanation of Derozio's dismissal from the Collq^e. Hie lutjoined 
letter throws no light some the mystery. 

We pretend to know a little more of the business than most of our contemporaries, and we will now 
proceed to detail it. The questions which Derozio has answered in the following letter, and which 
were adduced as charges against him, do not state the whole truth. These charges grew oat of tiie 
principal reason, which has hitherto been hidden from the view of all. They were the offspring of un- 
founded calumny. The Native managers of the Hindu College, were alarmed at the pr^gren which 
some of tlie pupils were making under Derozio, by actually cutting their way through ham and beef, 
and wading to Liberalism through tumblers of beer. From this new feature of Hindu education, the 
praise or blame of which must rest on the memory of Derozio, the managers dreaded the worst oonae- 
quences. To put a stop to further insight into the science of Gastronomy, Derozio was ^'wmisitfrd in 
1831. This is the plain unvarnished story ! 

2b H. H. Wilson, Esq. 

My Dear Sir, — Your letter which I received last eveningr should have been answered earlier, but 
for the interference of other matters which required my attention. I beg your acceptance of this apology 
for the delay, and thank you for the interest which your most excellent communication proves that yon 
continue to take in me. I am sory however, that the questions you have put to me will impose upon yon 
the disagreeable necessity of reading this long justification of my conduct and opinions. But I must 
congratutate myself that this opportunity is afforded me of addressing so influential and distinguished 
an individual as yourself, upon matters which, if true, might seriously affect my character. My friends 
need not, however, be under any apprehension for me ; for myself, the consciousness of right is my 
safeguard and my consolation. 

1st. I have never denied the existence of a God in the hearing of any human being. If it be wrong 
to speak at all upon such a subject, I am guilty, for I am neither afraid nor ashamed to confess having 
stated the doubts of Philosophers upon this head, because I have also stated the solution of those doubts. 
Is it forbidden any where to arg^ie upon such a question ? If so, it must be equally wrong to adduce 
an argument upon either side : or is it consistent with an enlightened notion of truth to mil onrsehres 
to any one view of so important a subject, resolving to close our ears and eyes against all impressions 
that oppose themselves to it ? How is any opinion to be strengthened, but by completely comprehending 
the objections that are offered to it, and exposing their futility ? And what have I done more than tiiis ? 
Entrusted as I was for some time with the education of youth, peculiarly circumstanced, was it for bm 
to have made them pert and ignorant dogmatists, by permitting them to know what could be ssid unon 
only one side of gprave que^^tions ? Setting aside the narrowness of mind which such a course might 
have evinced, it would have been injurious to the mental energies and acquirements of the young men 
themselves, and (whatever may be said to the contrary), I can vindicate my procedure by quoting no 
less orthodox an authority than Lord Bacon : — ** If a man," says this Philosopher (and no one ever had 
a bettiT right to pronounce an opinion upon such matters thau he) '* will begin with certainties, he shall 
end in doubts." Thi^ I need scarcely observe, is always the cose with contented ignorance, when it is 
roused too lute to naught. One doubt suggests another, and universal scepticism is the consequence. 
I theref(»re thought it my duty to acquaint several of the College students with the substance of 
Hume's celebrated dialogue between Cleanthes and Philo, in which the most subtle and refined argu- 
ments against Theism are adduced. But I have also furnished them with Dr. Reids' and Dogald 
Stewart's more acute repliejt to Hume ; replies which to this day, continue unrefutcd. This Is the head 
and front of my oflending. If the religious opinions of the students have become unhinged in oonae- 
quen<% of the course 1 have pursued, the fault is not muie. To produce conviction in their minds was 
not within my power, and if I am to be condemned for the atheism of some, let me receive credit for 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 105 

the Theism of others. Believe me, My dear Sir. I am too thoroughly imbued with a deep sense of 
human ignorance and of the perpetual vicissitudes of opinion, to speak with confidence even of the most 
unimportant matters. Doubt and uncertainty besiege us too closely to admit the boldness of dogmatism 
to enter an enquiring mind ; and far be it from me to say that " this is" and ** that is not/' when, 
after the most extensive acquaintance with the researches of science, and after the most daring flight.<9 
of genius, we must confess with sorrow and disappointment, that humility becomes the highest wis. 
dom, for the highest wisdom assures man of his ignorance. 

Your next question is *• Do you think respect and obedience to parents no part of moral duty ?" 
For the first time in my life did I learn from your letter that I am charged with having inculcated so 
hideous, so unnatural, so abominable a principle. The authors of such infamous fabrications are too 
degraded even for my contempt. Had my father been alive, he would have repelled the slander, by 
telling my calumniators that a son who had endeavoured to discharge every filial duty as I have done, 
could never have entertained such a sentiment. But my mother can testify how utterly inconsistent it 
is with my conduct, and upon her testimony I might rest my vindication. However, I will not stop 
short there. So far from having even maintained or taught such opinion, I have always insisted upon 
retpect and obedience to parents. I have indeed condemned that feigned respect which some children 
evince, being hypocritical and injurious to the moral character. But I have always endeavoured to 
dierish the genuine feelings of the heart, and to direct them into proper channels. Instances, however, 
in which I have insisted upon respect and obedience to parents are not wanting. I shall quote two 
important ones for your satisfaction, and as the parties are always at hand, you may at any time sub- 
atantiate what I say. About two or three months ago, Dukhinanundun Mookerjya (who has made so 
great a noise lately,) informed me that his father's treatment of him had become utterly unsupportable, 
and that his only chance of escaping it was by leaving his father's house. Although I was aware of the 
truth of what he had said, I dissuaded him from taking such a course, letting him know that much 
should be endured from a parent, and that the world would not justify his conduct, if he left his home 
without being actually turned out of it. He took my advice, though, I regret to say, only for a short 
time : a few weeks ago he left his father's house, and to my great surprize, engaged anotlier in my 
neighbourhood. After he had completed his arrangements with his landlord, he informed me for the 
first time of what he had done, and when I asked him why he had not consulted me before he took .such 
a step — ** because," replied he, ** I knew you would have prevented it." The other instance relates t** 
Mohes Chunder Singh. Having recently behaved rudely to his father, and offended some of his relatives, 
be called upon me at my house, with his uncle, Umacharan Bose, and his cousin, Nundolol Singh. I 
reproached him severely for his contumacious behaviour, and told him until he sought forgiveness from 
his father, I would not speak to him. 1 might mention other cases, but these may suffice. 

"Do you think marriages of brothers and sisters innocent and allowable?" This is your third 
question. " No," is my di:>tinct reply, and I never taught such an absurdity. But I am at a loss to 
find out how such misrepresentations as those to which I have been exposed, have become current. 
No person who has ever heard me speak upon such subjects could have circulated these untruths ; at 
least I can hardly bring myself to think that one of the College students with whom I have been con- 
nected could be either such a fool as to mistake every thing I ever said, or such a knave as wilfully to 
mistake my opinions. I am rather disposed to believe that weak people who an; determined upon 
being alarmed, and finding nothing to be frightened at, have imputed these follies to me. That I 
aboidd be callfdi a sceptic and an in^del Ls not surprizing, as these names are always given to persons 
wbo dare think for themselves in religion ; but I assure you that the imputations which you say are 
alleged against me, I have learned for the first time from your letter, never having dreamed that 
sentiments so opposed to my own, could have been ascribed to me. I must trust, therefore, to your 
generosity to give the most unqualified contradiction to these ridiculous stories. I am not a greater 
monster than most people ; though I certainly should not know myself, were I to credit all that is said 
of me. I am aware that for some weeks some busy bodies have been manufacturing the most absurd 
and groundless stories about me, and even about my family. Some fools went so far as to say that my 
ttiter, ^hUe others said that my daughter (though I have not one) was to have been married to a Hindoo 
young man ! ! ! I traced the report to a person named Bindabun Ghosal, a poor Brahmin, who lives 
by going from house to house to entertain the inmates with the news of the day, which he invariably 
intenti. However, it is a satisfaction to reflect, that scandal, though often noisy, is not everlasting. 

Now that I have replied to your questions, allow me to ask you, my dear Sir, whether the expediency 
of yidding to popular clamour can be offered in justification of the measures adopted by the native 
managers of the College towards me ? their proceedings certainly do not record any condemnation of 
me, but does it not look very like condemnation of a man's conduct and character to dismiss him troui 
office when popular clamour is against him .' Vague reports and unfounded rumours went abroad 
OQDoendng me : the native managers have confirmed them by acting towards me, as they have done. 
Ry5«wft my saying it, but I believe there was a determination on their part to get rid of me, not to 
latiafy popular cliunour, but their own bigotry. Had my religion and morals been investigated by them 
tiiey could have no groimds to proceed against me : they therefore thought it most expedient to make 
no enquiry, but witii anger and precipitation to remove me from the institution. The slovenly manner 
in which tiicy hare done so is a sufficient indication of the spirit by which they were moved, for in their 
rage* they have forgotten what was due even to common decency. Every person who has heard of the 
way in which they have acted, is indignant ; but to complain of their injustice, would be paymg them a 
greater compliment than they deserve. 

In concluding this address, allow me to apologize for its inordinate length, and to repeat my thanks 
for all that you have done for me in the unpleasant affair by which it had been occasioned. 

I remain, my dear Sir, your's sincerely, 
(Signed) H. L. V. Dsnozio. 



106 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



It was now that Derosio, who htd for tome time ptst been Uie Sub-Editor of the huiui OaietU, 
had aasiiited certain students of the College in publishing a periodical entitled '* Tke Brnquirtr,*' and had 
conducted a small evening paper, the Hetperui, came to the resolution of establishing a large dailj 
paper, the Ea$t Indian, He called upon his countrymen to assist him, and thej responded to his call. 
Poor Derozio was, however, never a popular Editor. 

Derozio was arrested in the midst of his labours by the hand of death. He died of Cholera Morbus, 
on the 23d December, 1831, in the 22d year of his age. He lingered full six days, and hopes were 
entertained by some of his friends, that his life would be spared. But it had been decreed otherwise. 
He was attended in his illness by Drs. Tytler and Grant ; the latter gentleman came daily to see him, 
and read to him passages from the second Book of the " Pleasures of Hope.'' On the Sunday preceding 
his death, the late Mr. J. W. Ricketts, the distinguished Blast Indian, called to see him, to him I>tfono 
expressed a wish to see the Rev. James Hill, whose eloquence had before touched his heart. The Rer. 
Gentleman came, and it is consolatory to remark, that, in his last moments, Deroiio coniiened Uiat he 
was a christian, and he died a believer in the saving faith of Jesus Christ. His career was abort 
but glorious ! 

Derozio's admiring countr3rmen met after his death, to consider of the erection of a pennaiiciit 
memorial of their affection and regard for his memory. The sum of money collected for a Monoment 
over his grave was about 800 rupees. This amount was misappropriated, and Deroiio's grave is now 
undistinguished among the crowded tombs of the Park Street Cemetery. 

In private life, Derozio was much beloved. He was an aifectionate son, a kind brother, and a warm 
friend. He was very lively and humorous. We confidently state that anger was never teen to doud 
his brow. Ail was sunshine with him. As a teacher, he won the affections of his pupils. Nerer was 
he known to speak rudely to them. If he wished any of them to keep out of his way his usual language 
was, '* My dear boy, you are not transparent." 

In conversation he was brilliant. He loved to discourse on, — 

•* Fate, freewill, foreknowledge absolute," 
and on this subject he was superficial and arrogant. He is now nearly forgotten. We understand 
that his writings have been published, and we sincerely hope that the writings of this man of genins will 
not be lost, but that they will preserve his name for some years to come. 

The compUen have been at tome paint to trace the tpot in which hit remamt taert depotUtd^ tmd 
find that the grave it at the Wettem extremity qf the Old (South) Park Street Burial Qrtnmd, aarl 
to the Monument of Major Moling^ on the South, 



Sacred to the Memory of David Baker, 

bom 6th November 1832, and departed this life 
the 2d June 1834, deeply and sincerely regret- 
ted by his parents, Thos. and Martha Baker. 

Sacred to the Memory of Marj Bird. 
Daughter of Robert Bird, Esq. of Taplon, 
Bucks, and sister of Robert M. Bird, Esq. B. C. S. 

who having quitted her home and country to 
comfort an afflicted brother, devoted herself to 

teaching the knowledge of Christ to the hea- 
then, especially to those of her own sex, and having 

laboured five years at Goruckpore, and with 
much blessing and acceptance four years in Cal- 
cutta, was called to her eternal rest 29th of 
May 1834, aged 47 years. 

" They that be wise shall shine as the bright- 
ness of the firmament, and they that turn many 
to righteousness as the stars for ever and ever." — 
Danl, 12 ch. 3. v. 



To the Memory of Mr. David Mills, 

who died 1st June 1834, after a residence of 41 

years in India, aged 65 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mi<«s Helen Henderson, 

who departed this life on the 28th June 1823, 

aged 18 years. 

. To the Memory of IVilliam, Infant son of 
Captain H. W. Wilkinson, and Susan his wife. 
Bom 2nd October 1822, died 20th July 1823, 
aged 9 months and 18 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of James Middleton, 

who departed this life 15th December, 1822, 

aged 28 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Thosaas MTood, 
Colonel of Engineers, and Companion of the most 

Honorable order of the Bath, who after fifty 
years service in the Bengal army, died at Calcut- 

ta, aged 68 years and 7 montha. 
On the 22nd day of January, A. D. 1834, among 

distinguished comrades, he stood *»mii^^ f- fQ^ 
talents of a high order, cultivated by science and 
matured by experience, gained in a brilliant career 
of active service and of distinguished profes- 
sional employment, domestic and foreign, in war 
and in peace, through Hindostan and the Deocan, 
in Assam and in Ava, in the Surveyor General's 
Department and in the campaigns of Lord Lake, 
who selected him to be his Engineer in Chief ' 
with the grand army. As a member of society, 
he was remarkable for cheerful wit regnlated 
by goodness of temper and heart ; as a finend his 

good deeds passed ordinary measure, and 

deadi disclosed liberalities which liviiy modesty 

had concealed. In his domestic relationa that 

he was greatly loving and loved, a sorrowing and 

numerous family seek to bear pious witossa 

by this insufficient and fnul memorial. 

This Monument, erected by James McNeigbt, 

is Sacred to the Memory of his bdoved and 

lamented wife Blisa, who died the 6th of 

August 1823, aged 38 years. 

In Memory of IXnUiam Kann. Esq. 

of the firm of Buchanan, Mann and Co. He died 

and was interred here on 10th August 1823, 

aged 38 years and 4 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. R. B. Dormisut, 

who departed this life 29th Dec. 1833, aged 

21 years and 26 days. 



SOUTH PARK ffTREET BURIAL GROUND. 



107 



Sacred to the Memory of Ann*, wife of 
Umit. T. S. O'HaUoran, H. M. 44th Regt. 
who departed thia life on the 24th of July 1823, 
aged 24 years, 5 months, and 14 days. 

Sacr ed to t he Memory of 

Captain WiUUtm Reynolds, 

formerly of the ** Royal Greorge," who died the 

9tii of December 1833, aged 52 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Catherine, 

infimt daughter of Frederick and Mana Millett, 

bom 3d October 1833, died 6th January 1834. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Henry Parker, 

of Deal, in the county of Kent, who died on the 

2nd November 1835. 



Sacred to the Memory of ^ITm. Thompson, Esq. 

of Mary Port, in the county of Cumberland, 

late commander of the ship ** Captain Cook," 

who departed this life on the 20th May 1834, 

aged 56 years. 

He was a good husband, an affectionate father, 

and sincere friend. His loss will be severely felt by 

many. This tablet is placed here as the last mark 

of respect, by his affectionate son, Wm. Thompson. 

In Memory of ^Villiam l^arren ^Vood, Esq. 

of Tirhoot. 
To the purest honor and integrity he united 
unfeigned benevolence and every social and ami- 
able virtue. A pious son, affectionate brother, 
and constant fnend. He died greatly regretted. 
iEtatis suae 55. Resurgam. 

To Carrol Humphrey, E!«q. M. D. 
of Albany, N. York, U. States of America, who 
died at Calcutta while attached as Surgeon to the 
American ship *' Edward," of Philadelphia, 
May 2l8t, 1834. 



Sacred to the Memory of Maxia Blixabeth, 
wife of the Rev. Theophilus Reichardt, who died 

March 16th, 1834, aged 40 years. 
A firm believer in Jesus ; an active and benevolent 

Christian ; an ornament of her sex ; universally 
loved and esteemed by all who knew her. She was 
truly one of those of whom the world was not 
worthy. Heb. xi. 38. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomas Richardson, Esq. 
of the Civil Service, Magistrate of the 24 Pergtm- 
nahs, and Superintendant of the Alipore Jail, 
who was unhappily murdered by the convicts 
under his charge, whilst engaged in the exercise of 
hia official duty, on the 5th April 1834, iEtat. 34. 
Thus in the mysterious providence of the 
Almighty was cut off in the prime of life and in 
the midst of a career of usefulness, an officer 
distinguished in his public capacity by intelligence, 
integrity and honor. His character as a private 
individual is enshrined in the affectionate recol1ec> 

tions of his friends and is cherished still more 

dearly in the heart of his afflicted widow, by whom 

this stone is erected. 



SacrtK] to the Memory of Capt. J. ^V. Porte, 

Pensioner in the Mahratta Service, who died 4th 

November 1833, aged 60 years. 

This Monument is erected by his beloved wife, 

Mary Porte. 

p 2 



To the Memory of "Walter Nlsbet, C. S. 
who departed this life on the 11th October 1883, 

aged 48 years. 

Tliis Monument b erected by his three brothers 

and a few of his most attached friends as a mark 

of the warm affection they bore him in life, and of 

tlie deep sorrow with which they now deplore 

his lo9s. A tablet has also been erected to his 

Memory in St. John's Cathedral. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Charles Clarke Bell, 

many years a Captain of this port. Obit. 26th 

October 1834, aged 35 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Col. John Vanghan, 

Fort and Town Major of Fort William. Obit. 1st 

November 1830, Mtat 52 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Thomas Du Bisson, Esq. Merchant, 

died 9th September 1830, aged 68 years. 



Thomas Russell Clarke, 

born 22d September 1830, died 24th Oct. 1830. 



Sacred to the. Memory ot Charles Bnsch, E^q. 
who died on the 3d of Sept. 1823, aged 48 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Marj Ziefersr, 

eldest daughter of Henry Hall, Esq. of Carlisle. 

Obit. 1st September 1823, iEtatis 23 years. 

Tho' low in earth your virtuous form decayed. 
My faithful wife, my loved Mary's laid ; 
In chastity you kept a husband's heart 
To all but him as cold as now thou art. 
To name your virtues ill befits his grief : 
"What was his bliss can now give no relief ; 
Your husband mourns, the rest let friendship tell. 
Fame spread your worth, your husband knew it 
well. 



** Her ways were ways of pleasantness, 
and all her paths were peace.' 



II 



In Memory of 
Mrs. Charlotte Caroline Harris, 

the beloved wife of Mr. C. W. Harris, and second 

daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. C. Leiever. 
who departed thia life on the 10th of May 1845, 

aged 21 years, 8 months and 25 days. 
" Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord." 



Sacred to the Memory of Qeorge l^alter, Esq. 
Lieut, in the Bengal Engineers, who di^ from 
fever, got at Saugor in the execution of his duty as 
Surveyor, on the 5th Sept. 1823, aged 22 yean. 
His loss is sincerely regretted by all his firiends. 
He was a most amiable youth and most promis- 
ing officer ; beloved and esteemed by all 
who knew him. 



Humphrey Ziang^ley, Esq. 

Chief Officer of the ship " Woodford," died 2d 

September 1823, aged 24 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Capt. Bdward Doreton, 

of the Madras Establishment, Aide-de-Camp 

to General Sir John Doveton, died on 

the 16th Sept. 1823, aged 22 years and 9 months. 



lOS 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



la Memory of Mr. ^ViUiam Olark, 

who departed this life Ist of August 1826, aged 

58 years, 4 months and 19 days. 

Think O ye who fondly languish 
O'er the grave of those you love, 
While your bosoms throb with anguish 
They are warbling hymns above ; 
While your silent steps are straying 
Lonely thro' night's deepening shade. 
Glory's brightest beams are playing 
Round the happy Christian's head. 

" As for me I will behold thy face in righteous- 
ness, I shall be satisfied when I awake with 
thy likeness. Ps 17. 15.' 



it 



Sacred to the Memory of Henry Hn|^h, 

the infant son of William and Jane Clark, 

Obit. 2d July 1842, ALt&t. 8 mos. and 20 days. 

Also of Theodore, 

bom 5th Dec. 1842, died 26tli May 1843. 

** He shall gather the lambs with his arms and 

carry them in his bosom." 



Sacred to the Memory of Helen, 

the beloved wife of Edward Lee Warner, Esq. 

of the Bengal Civil Service and eldest daughter of 

Dr. Macrae of Chittagong. 

Bom September 26, 1796, died September 1. 1830. 

*• Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord." 



To the Memory of Mr. Qeorg^e Minor, 
of the H. C. Pilot Service, Obit. 20th July 1824, 
aged 28 years and 10 months. 

Lord I commit my soul to thee, 
Accept the sacred trust. 
Receive this nobler part of me. 
And watch my sleeping dust. 
This stone is erected by his afflicted widow. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Jolin Murray, 

Obit. 13th July 1827, Ait. 31 years, 

7 months and 5 days. 

Thou art gone to the grave but we will not de- 
plore thee, 

Since God was thy refuge, thy ransom, thy guide ; 

He gave thee, he took thee and he will restore thee 

And death has no sting since the saviour has died. 

Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of 
his saints. — 16 Ps. 15 v. 



Saor«d to the Memory of Mr. James Thompson, 

Obit. 10th December 1827, Mi. 50 years, 
9 months and 26 days. 

Dear is the spot where Christians sleep j 
And sweet the strain which angels pour ; 

Oh ! why should we in anguish weep, . 

He is not lost but gone before. ! 

*• Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, ' 
for the end of that man is peace." — Ps. 37. 37. ' 

Here Iteth the remains of M r. David Phillips, I 

who departed this life on the 24th Sept. 1823, j 

aged 87 years. 

Around thy venerable tomb 
With fond affections still thy children come. 
And tho* no more the loud voiced hymn they sing, 
Still silent prayers and heartfelt wishes bring. 
That thy departed spirit secure and blest 
May with the destined heirs of glory rest ; 
-\nd for thy tender cares here bestowed 
Treasure in heaven may have and joy in God. 



To the Memory of J4w^» «*w«^wy 

Capt. 2d BatD. 9 Regt. M. N. L who died off 

Fultah on 22d Sept. 1823, aged 36 yean. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Broivn, Esq. 

late of Gibraltar, who departed this Ufe the 14 th 

Aug. 1830, aged about 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Anne Smith, 
wife of Mr. Samuel Smith, and only daughter of 
the late Charles Clavering, Esq., died 6th August 

1830, aged 28 years, 5 months and 17 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Charlotte 'Wenifrod Smith, 

wife of Samuel Smith, Esq. and daughter of the 

kte Col. Lafleur, died 17th September 1841, 

aged 30 years. 

A nd that of Alexander, 

died 20th April 1840, aged 6 days. 

Also in Memory of Oeorga Thonuui, 

son of Samuel and Charlotte Smith, died 12th Jan. 
1838, aged 1 year, 6 months and 26 days. 



Sacred to the Alemory of Maiy Anne Tlckdl, 
wife of Lieut.. Col. Rd. Tickell, C. B. of the 

Engineers, who departed this life 27th Sept. 1833, 

respeoted, beloved and regretted hj all who 

knew her. ^tat. 44. 

Erected by her affectionate and afflicted husband. 

Farewell bless 'd shade ; if ought below 
May reach thy world of bliss. 
May added joy be thine to know 
How thou wert loved in this. 



Iq Memory of Mr. Alexandar 
son of Alexander George Paterson, Esq., who de- 
parted this life 25th Dec. 1823, 
aged 20 years, 11 months and 16 days. 

Mrs. Hannah Hammond, 

departed this life on the 9th October 1833, 
aged 55 years. 

Id Memory of Mary Ann MTatkinson, 

died 16th September 1835, aged 16 years, 
1 month and 27 days. 
Also of her father, Mr. J. w'atkinson, 
died 4th June 1837, aged 53. 



To the Memory of 

Colonel Sir James Monat, Bart 

Bengal Engineers, 

who departed this life at sea on Board the H. C. 

Ship " Prince Regent," the 9th May 1829, 

aged about 63 years. 

Sir James Mouat served as a soldier fai India 
46 years, acted as Aid-de-Camp to Sir Robert 
Abercromby, in 1794, at the battle of the Rohil- 
las, and in 1804 was elected Professor of Hin- 
dostanee in the College of Fort William. His 
merits were repeatedly noted in thb orders of 
Government, but his elegant manners, brilliant 
talents, classic taste, literary accomplishments, 
amiable disposition, and native goodness of heart, 
could alone be justly estimated by his friends. 

This tablet has been placed as a tribute of 
regard, esteem and affection, to a lamented 

parent, by Dr. Mouat, M. D. Surgeon H. M, 
13th Dragoons. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



109 



lliis tomb U erected to the Memory of 

Colonel Oluurles Monaty Chief Eofpneer 

on the Bengal Establishment, who departed this 

life at Fort William on the 25th of June 1830, 

aged 68 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Charlotte Slima Dick, 

the infant daughter of John and Harriet Lowe, 

taken from them the 4th July 1830, 

aged 14 months and 17 days. 

Also her beloved brother, 

l^lTiUiam Henry Maling', 

who died on the 20th October 1830, 

aged 3 years and 1 month. 

Consecrated to the Memory of 

Mrs. Slvira ^VUtsliire, 

wife of Thomas Wiltshire Esq., bom the 27th 

September 1807, died at Calcutta on the 
22d April 1830, aged 22 years 6 months 

and 24 days. 
Yes I must weep tho' reason oft in vain 
B^ my fond heart, its heaving sighs restrain. 
And oft suggests to my afflicted mind 
That earthly virtues, heavenly joys shall find. 
Go then, dear shade, thy just reward receive. 
Fate bids me trust, tho' nature bids me grieve. 
I bow submissive to the will divine, 
Mine is the sorrow, be the glory thine. 

Sacred to the Memory of S. Noaky, Esq. 
bom the 13th Febmary 1777, 
died the 2d June 1830. 



Mark Middleton, Obit. 2drd May 1830. 

Sacred to the Memory of Col. Henry Zmlach, 
who entered the H. C. Service as a Cadet of Ia> 
fantry in 1782, was appointed Secretary to 
the Board of Superintendence for the breed of 
cattle on the 31st July 1802 ; Deputy Mill- 
tary Auditor General 25th June 1804, and suc- 
ceeded to the head of that department on the 
11 til July 1811, the duties of which offices he 

disdiarged with honor and credit to himself 
and to the perfect satisfaction of the Government 
under which he served, till the close of his 
earthly career on the 8th March 1830, 
aged 69 years, 9 months and 8 days. 
This Monument is erected as a tribute of affec- 
tion by his son, Alexander Imlach. 



, Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain l^illiam Zfuniadatne, 
Deputy Commissary General of the Army, 
who died on the 6th January 1830, aged 38 years. 
Distinguished in public life by talent, honor and 
industry ; beloved and esteemed in private 
society for his mild virtues and pecu- 
liarly amiable general character. 
Hiis stone is inscribed as a last sad tribute to the 

remains of one who in life possessed with the 

highest claims to the public admiration, the warm 

private friendship of numerous individuals, 

amongst whom were ranked some of the 

first characters in India, and carried with him to 

the tomb the sincere regret of all 

who knew him. 



Sacred to the Memory of Zaanra, 

the wife of EkUnond Wilkinson, who departed this 

life on board the H. C. Ship '* Thomas Gren- 

ville,'* at Saugor, on the 6th of March 1828, 

aged 37 years. 
A most affectionate and virtuous wife, the best of 

mothers and a most sincere friend. 
My soul with grateful thoughts of love entirely is 

possessed. 
Because the Lord vouchsafes to hear the voice of 

my request ; 
On God's Almighty name I call and thus to Him 

1 pray'd, 
Lord 1 beseech thee save my soul with sorrows 

quite dismay'd 
Then free from pensive cares, my soul resume thy 

wonted rest. 
For God has wondrously to thee, His bounteous 

love express'd. 
Then what return to him shall I for all his good- 
ness make, 
ril praise his name, and with glad zeal the cup of 
blessing take. 

Also of Mary Dice, 

their second daughter, who departed this life 
12th Oct. 1823, aged 4 years. 
A most interesting and loved child. 
Sweet flow'r farewell, too fair for earth, 
Brief space to us thy charms were given, 
The hand that form'd thee, knew ^y worth, 
And took thee 'mongst his own in heav*n. 

Sacred to the Memory of Cathcart MethTea, 
Captain in the 20th Regt. B. N. I., who departed 
this life 26th November 1823, ^tatis.— 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Marg^aret Oee, 
who departed this life on the 6th of Oct. 1823, 

aged 55 years. 



In remembrance of her who was admired and 

beloved by all, 

Sleanora, 

the beloved wife of W. H. Websterfield of the 

town of Calcutta, Attorney at Law. 
She departed this transitory life on the 2d Dec. 
1823, in the 27th year of her age. 
This humble Memorial is erected by liim who has 
no other source of regret, than that he sur- 
vives her irreparable loss. 
Peace ! everlasting peace to her ! 

Charles Rayner, Esq. 
Surgeon of the Ship *' Woodford,** died 15th 
Dec. 1823, aged 27 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut.-Col. Francis Dmnunond. 
of the Bengal Army, who departed this life on the 
7th of Dec. 1823, aged 60. 
No man possessed a more kind or benevolent 
heart than he who lies beneath this silent tomb. 
His virtues will long be cherished in the hearts 
of those to whom his friendship was dear. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr Henry Davies, 

who departed this life on the 8th Dec. 1823, 

aged 32 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. 8an&uel Swreetin|^, 
Branch Pilot of the H. C. Pilot Service, 

who departed this life 
on the morning of the 2l8t October 1823, 
aged 39 years and 3 months. 

Master l^m. Sweetinf^, 
who died on the 18th ofPeb. 1830, aged 17 years. 



110 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Here repoteth the remains of Mr. Robert FIneli, 
youngest son of John Fmch, Esq. 
of Hendon, Middlesex, , 
who departed this life on the 15th Feb. 1842, 
aged 23 years, 4 months and 2 days. 
Kind angels watch the sleeping dost 
. Till Jesus comes to raise the just. 
Then may he wake with sweet surprise 
And in his Saviour's image rise. 
This tablet is placed by his afflicted widow, 

Eliza Finch 



Sacred to the Memory of 
MarU Elisabeth Ricketts, 

Wife of Mordaunt Ricketts, Bengal Civil Service, 

bom 10th March 1794, died 18th Jan. 1824. 
Her short bat eventful life was passed in the strict 

performance of every duty. She was a most 
dutiful child ; a most affectionate wife and sister ; 
and so truly pious and good, that her affectionate 
and afflicted husband and family, 
derive some consolation from the conviction 
that her immortal soul is now reposing in 
the bosom of her Creator. 



Here are deposited the mortal remains of 
Mrs. Jaae Dacosta, 
who departed this life on the 2nd January, 1830, 

a|[ed 49 years and 10 months. 
Also that ot h«r con.^ort, Qeorge Dacosta, E^q 
who departed this life on the 25th day of April, 
1838, aged 67 years, 7 months and 6 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mni. Cicilia Zileweljn, 
who departed this life 9th of November 1815, 
aged 31 years and 7 months. 
Earth on earth remember well 
When earth to tarth shall go to dwell. 
Then earth in earth shall close remain, 
Till earth from earth shall come again. 
Gen. c. iii. v. 19. Ecle. c. xii. v. 7 



1^0 the Memory of Julia 
who departed this life on the 15th October, 1822, 

aged 18 mouths. 
AUo Julia, who departed this life 
on the 28th October, 1825, aged 9 months. 
The infant children of Jenkin and Anna Llewelyn. 
Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, 
Death came with friendly care, 
The opening buds to Heaven conveyed, 
And bade them blossom there. 



Sacred to the Memory of Slisai 

wife of Mr. W. Llewelyn, who departed this life 

on the 9th December, 1838, after a short illness 

of 14 days, aged 36 years, 

leaving a husband and five childr^i 

to bemoan their loss. 



Sleanor, daughter of John Smith, Esq. 

of Drongan, in the county of Air, 

died 13th July, 1818, aged 8 months 7 days. 

Mun(^i his only son, 

died 3d Augt. 1824, aged 11 months 11 days. 

Sleanor, hiA beloved wife, 

on board the ship •• Providence" in Lat. 16 North, 

Long. 88=15 East, on the 29th May, 1835, 

aged 27 years. 

To the Memory of 

Tboa. Mayne Broipvne, Esq., who departed tliis 

life September 8, 1807, aged 42 years. 



Robert Brnee. infant mni ef 
Henry Frands end Euisa PUoo Him^ 
died 15di April, A. D. 1821, tged 16 



In Memory of 

Sarah BUsa CUtharfaio Bovlton 

daughter of Thomai and Sarah Booltoii. 

Obt. 5th July, 1821. ^t. 9 montfaa. And also d 

Obarlotta Aopista Bovltony 

daughter of the above ; 

Obt. 14di Feb. 1826. ^t. 1 year 7 montlia. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Obarlea Beanatty 
who died 15th February, 1816, aged 65 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain Bobert Brown, 

who departed this life 9th July 1805»aged 36 yaars. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. BlisaSaUe^ 

who departed tiiis life 9th Jan. 1806, tged 26 yean. 



Sacred to the Memory of ^ 

Infant son of Malcolm and Elisa McKaosie, 
died 15th August 1825, aged 7 days. 



Oa^n, son of Captain Oavin Yonnf , 
bom July 13, and died November 15, 1821. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Marj Ann Heywood, 

wife of Isaac Heywood, who departed this 

life 30th May 1804, aged 17 years 7 months. 

XL. c. Isaiah, 1 v. Comfort ye, comfort 

ye my people, saith your God." 



Here lies the mortal remains of 

Ebeneser, ron of J. G. J. 

Obut 6 July, 1814. 

John Oeor ga J efforaoa, Obiit 27 Aagnst 1814. 

Oharlea IPITliite, Obit. 15 September 1815, 

Oeors* Oharlea JefferaoBi Obiit 6 Junv 1821. 

** fiiessed are the dead who die in the Lord." 

In Memory of MisMi BUsa Aiuao Qooldor, 

who died 1st August 1815, aged 13 years 6 montha. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Richard DowdesswaU, 

a lovely infant son of Capt. J. B. Seely, 

died 20th Nov. 1821, aged 2 yean 1 month. 



Sacred to the Memorr of 

Qeorge Morlaon, E-iq. 

who died 19th January 1815, aged 36. 



Beneath this dreary tomb doth lie 
As much virtue as could die. 

Mrs. Ann M'Carthy. 

the lady of Captain James M Carthj, 

and daughter of Captain Alexander Smart, 

who departed this life piously 9th Sept. 1815, 

sincerely and most deservedly lamented 

by her husband, an aged mother, 

and numerous acquaintances. 

She was a real friend to the indigent and 

distressed, and left several orphans she 

brought up to mourn over her grave. 

May her soul rest in peace with Grod. Amen. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Ill 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut-Col. Q«org« Hiekson Fai^an, 

at the early age of 33. 
Adjutant Greneral of the Army. 
He possessed in an eminent degree 
the qualities which command respect 
and ensure success in public life. 
Inflexible in principle, 
steady in the object of his honorable pursuit, 
he devoted with zeal, which knew no limit 
to exertion, the energies of a powerful mind, 
to the service he loved and adorned ; 
to it he sacrificed health and fortune, 
private life as a friend, brother, father and hus- 
band, in all which relations he has left those 
who will long weep over his untimely grave. 
He was honored and loved. 
Obiit iEtatis 42. 
His remains are interred near those 
f his sister, whom he cherished and mourned. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Sarali, the wife of 

Benjamin Comberbach, of Garden Reach. 

Died Sept. 18,1821, 

aged 51 years ; deeply lamented. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Benjamin Con&berbach| Esq. 
of Calcutta, Attorney at Law, died 3d 
August 1823, aged 53 years ; deeply lamented. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr9. Marj Reeves, 

widow of the late Mr. J. B. Reeves, 

who departed this life December 21, lb 15, 

aged 44 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr». Frances Tomkjms, 
who departed this life 10th October 1815, 
aged 23 years, 4 months and 7 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
John Daly, Esq late of Madras. 
who departed this life April 18, 1807. 
This Monument 
I erected by his widow, Rachel Susannah Daly. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mm Emily Christie, 

third danghter of Capt. Charles Christie, 
of Gunnirbury Lodge, in the county of 
Middlesex. She departed this life 4th of 
July 1821, aged 17 yean. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

wife of Henry Cooke, E!squire, who departed 

this life the 18th July 1821, aged 39 years. 

Most deservedly and sincerely regretted 

by all her relatives and fnends. 

Beneath this Marble 
are deposited also the mortal remains of 

Slisabeth Frances Peard, 
Niece of the above named Eliza Cooke, 
and daughter of the late Philip Peard, Elsq. 
of Ely Place, in the County of Middlesex, 
who at the early age of 19 years, and 
after a few months residence in Calcutta 
was called away from the society of 
her family and friends, in the joyful 
hope of endless rest in the bosom of 
her Father and her God. 
Obiit 27 months ; Die Jan. 1824. 

Within this Tomb 

are also deposited the remains of 

Henry Cooke, E^q. 

who departed this life 29th January 1828, 

aged 59 years and 29 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieutenant Brook mTatson, 

24th Regiment Bengal N. Infantry, 

who departed this life 1 1 day of October 1817, 

aged 30 years. 



To the Memory of ZSlisabeth, the wife of 

Captain Daniel Ross, of Hourah, 

and daughter of Lieut. George Forbes, Bombay 

army, who was bom on the 18th of October 1781, 

and departed this life 8th of February 1818. 

Erected by her disconsolate husband. 



To the Memory of 

Lieutenant Edward Gyfford, H. M. 14th Regt 

who departed this life2 1st Dec. 18 17, aged 22 years. 



Mrs. Anna Townshend, 

bom 27 December 1805, died 15 August 1822. 
Aged 16 years, 7 months 18 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. BUsa Clark, 

wife of Mr. Clark, 

of the Country Service, who departed 

this life 25 October 1812, aged 19 years. 



laster lUTm. IZarrey, died lOih August, 1816, 
aged 4 years and 6 months ; 
and M»3 Jane Harvey, 
died 28th August 1823, aged 26 years and 9 
months. A1.<h> Mr. Francis Harvey, 
died 18th March 1835, aged 60 years, 
1 month and 9 days. 



In remembrance of 
Mrs. Mari^aret Potter, 

beloved wife of Samuel Potter, 

who died 17th April 1825, 

aged 27 years, 1 month and 12 dayx. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. ArrabeUa Robertson, 
who departed this life on 19th July 1817, 
at the early age of 25 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Snsan Cadell, wife of 

George Cadell, Major, Madras Establishment, 

who departed this life on the 1 June 1818, 

aged 27 years. 

The choicest blessing which could have 

been bestowed upon her husband, fmnily 

and friends, she possessed the purest 

and liveliest faith in our blessed Lord and 

Saviour Jesus Christ, through him alone 

she expected redemption. 

The warmest aflfections of the heart and 

a highly cultivated mind were in her so 

happily united that no words can 

express her inestimable worth. 

Sacred to th e Me mory of 
John Major l^lTUson, Esq. 
of the Bengal Medical Establishment, 
who died 24 May 1818, aged 40 years. 



112 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Oeorce Hmnphrejes, 

a native of Newington in Kent, 
and Branch Pilot in the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life 29 April 181G, 

aged 48 years. 

This stone what few vain marbles can, 

May truly say, here lies an honest man. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Hannah Maria, daufrhter of the late 
Captain John Campbell, Madras Artillery, 
who departed this Ufe Sept. 4th, 1817, 
aged 19 years. 
This Monument is erected by her 
aflfectionate and only sister Adelaide, 
wife of Captain Archibald Galloway, 
of the Bengal army. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain IWllliam Friend, 
Obiit October 7, 1817, iEtat 47 years. 

Lamented and much regretted is thy end. 
By those who knew thy worth, poor friend. 

This Monument is erected to commemorate the 

departed worth of John Colman, Esq. 
many years resident of Calcutta. He was dis- 

tinguished for his unbounded benevolence, 
urbanity of manners, and strict integrity. He 
lived esteemed and died regretted by all who had 
the pleasure of his acquaintance. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Keam Delany, 

who departed this life on the 4th of Sept. 1817, 

aged 41 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of DaTidniriepland, E<^. 

several years a Magistrate of the Town of Calcutta, 

who departed tlus life on the 20th November 

1817, aged 43 years. 

Greatly beloved by a numerous circle of friends, 

a few of whom have erected this Monument 
in testimony of his virtues and their own regret. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mm Ann Agpies Patch, 

died 1st March 1824, aged 25 years. 

Sncred to the Memory of John Taylor, Esq. 
who died the 4th of Dec. 1822, aged 32 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of the Honorable, Francis, 

aged 29 years ; 
second son of the Right Honorable Hugh 
Lord Sempill. CalcutU 2d Jan. 1823. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elisabeth Clara Dnnsterville, 

who departed this life the 10th of Dec. 1822. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jane Cooper, 

wife of Captain George Cooper, Bengal Army, 

who departed this life the 20th' February 1823, 

aged 43 years, 2 months and 27 days. 
" The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



Sacred to the Memory of T. Spans. Esq. M. D. 
who died 4th Jan. 1836, aged 33 years. 

Sacre<I to the Memory of Thomas Gohrin, Esq. 
Obit. 24th December 1835, ^t. 36 years. 
Regretted by all who had the pleasure 
of his acquaintance. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain J. F. May, 72d Refft. N. I. 

who departed this life on 22d February 1836, 

aged 36 years. 

This Tablet is erecied by the officers of his Regt. 

as a token of their esteem and regard. 



Edeline Elisabeth, 

4 th daughter of Charles De Verinne, died 15th 
January 1836, aged 17 months 10 days. 



Alfred IHurand, 

fourth son of Francis William Darand, died 4th 
Dec. 1843, aged 3 years, 1 month and 4 days. 



In Memory of Mrs. i^^i - •••^^••••, 

died 1st March 1836, aged 32 years. 



To the Memory of J. HIT. ■■■»»■■■«»■ , 

whose open nature, warm affections and a mind 

deeply imbued with the purest principles of 

honor and of truth, secured the regard of many 

valued friends and very general esteem. 

He died January 23, 1816, aged 31, 

Sincerely regretted. 



To the Memory of Benjanin 

and Harriet, bis wife. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Miss Bridcet Qibnorey 

who died on the 22d Jane 1835, aged 33 yean. 



To the Memory of IXTilliam Twinini^y Esq. 

Member of the Royal College of Surgeons 
in London. Surgeon in the Senice of the H. E. 
I. Company, Bengal Establishment, first perma- 
nent Assistant Surgeon to the Presidency 
General Hospital, and Secretary to the Medical 

and Ph3rsical Society of Calcatta. 

This Monument is erected by his professional 

brethren in India to mark the Ugh sense 

which they entertained of his character and of his 

eminent services, which he rendered in the canse 

of Medical improvement and research 

in that country. 

Bom A. D. 1780, died at CalcutU 25th August 

1835, aged 45 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of. 
second daughter of Col. J. D. Shearwood, Bengal 
Artillery, and wife of David Carmichael 
Smyth, Esq. of Bengal Civil Service, bom 26th 
Sept. 1798, died 5th June 1835. 
" Blessed are the pure in heart for they 
shall see God." 



Sacred to t he Memory of 

Lieut.-Col. 'William Kennedy, 

Deputy Auditor Greneral of the Bengal Army, 

Obit. 7th January 1836. aged 52 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
MiM Matilda Brown, 
died 4th June 1835, aged 31 years, 2 months. 

and 9 days. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



113 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. filiaab«th AdiunSy 
died on the 14tfa May 1835, aged 35 yearsi 

5 months and 13 days. 

Also of her infitnt daughter, EUsabefth, 
died 30th June 1835, aged 1 month 25 days. 

Also Joseph Admmsi, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 25th May 1837, 

aged 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory ot 

Mr. Edward Chalcralt, 

who died 11th May 1835, aged 20 years, 

6 months and 28 days. 

Also to the Memory of 

Mrs. Blisa OhalcrafI, 

who died 13th May 1835, aged 51 years. 

To the Memory of Anna, 
the wife of Mr. J. R. Coles, Obit. 24th May 
1835, i£t. 37. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

SUsabatlk Ann, daughter of 

Hugh and Ann Fergusson, who died on the 11th 

Dec. 1822, aged 1 year and 4 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Marj Ann C. Schalch, 

wife of Lieat. John A. Schalch, and daughter of 

James Meik, M. D. who died 15th Dec. 1822, 

aged 18 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut. John Hadaway, 24th N. I. 

who departed this life 22nd April 1823, 

aged 34 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Da-idd Tombnll, Esq. 

who died 14th December 1822, aged 54. 

Having been for a long period Resident at Mirza- 

pore, as Civil Surgeon, and engaged in 

extensive trade to almost all parts of the world. 

His name as a mercantile man was 

conspicuous and his loss lamented by many 

personal friends. 

M. S. Marj Ann Diyden, 
Nat. XXV. March 1808. 
Obit. xvii. April 1835. 
** O Almighty God whose merciful forgiveness and 

power is without limit, we pray thee, raise 
this oor sister to a blessed resurrection and to 
eternal hap piness in heaven." 
Also of her son. MTilliam Dryden, 
Obit. xxii. August 1838, 
^tat. xiv. years and iv. months. 



John David Glark, 
died 8th April 1835, aged 28 years, 3 months 

and 12 days. 
Erected by James Mungo Clark, to the Memory 

of his brother. 



Sacred to the memory of 

Capuio Charles Ghray. 

of the country service, who departed this life 2n(l 

January 1835, aged 45 years. 

This stone is erected by a sincere and 

attached friend. 



Sacred to the Memoir of 

Lieut. QeoTM Borrodalle, 

of the 49th Rc^. N. I. Brigade Major at 

Barrackpore, died 8th January 1835, 

aged 29 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Fanny, 
the beloved wife of Colonel O'Halloran, C. B. 
died 22d, January 1835, 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Samuel Thouias Ooad, Esq. 

some time one of the Judges of the Court of 

Sudder Dewanny Adawlut, who died 25th 

January 1823, at the age of 44 years. 

To the Memory of 

Captain P. aReilly, H. M. 44th Regt. 

who died 25th May 1823, aged 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Charles Scott Robertson, Esq. 

Son of the late J. Robertson, Esq. superintending 

surgeon on the Elstablishment, who departed 
this life 23rd of April 1823, deeply regretted by all 

his relatives and friends. He was a most 

affectionate and kind brother, and time only can 

soften the affliction caused by his untimely loss, 

to his distressed Sister and Brothers. 



Mr. John Stables, 
Died 16th May 1823. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

The Rev. John Pag^et Hastings, A. R. 

who died 22nd August 1822, aged 32 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of •.»••,, 

the beloved Wife of Lieut. -Col. John Paton, 

who lived justly respected in Society, and was 

followed to her grave by the esteem of all classes 

of the community. 
Died 22nd September 1822, aged 45 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Patrick Stewart, Esq. 

of the Firm of Stewart and Robertson, merchants, 

who departed this life the 29th day of Oct. 1822, 

in the 53rd year of his age. 
Indebted to nature for a mind firm to benevolence 
and alive to the best feelings of the heart, 
this excellent man passed through life in ihe 
habitual exercise of every social virtue, artless ; 
unassuming, and modest in his deportment ; 
mild, forbearing, and considerate in his temper. 
Incapable of harbouring, as of uttering an 
uncharitable thought, and prompt in the 
performance of every good action. 
He was eminently distinguished for piety to God, 
unblemished integrity and true Christian charity, 

benevolent to man. It was said of him, 
tliat he never made an enemy and never lost a 
friend, and as he left none of die duties of life un- 
performed, so his exemplary and endearing conduct 
to those with whom he was connected, 
rendered him to them an object of the most 
unbounded affection. In the bitterness of grief, 

under the pressure of a loss so irretrievable 
they will seek consolation where alone it is to be 

found, in the promises of the Gospel : 
** He that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet 
shall be live, and whosoever liveth and believfth 
in me shall never die.'' 



114 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
QeoT^ Skardon, 

Son of R. Stewart and Mary his Wife, 
who departed this life 31st July 1836, 

aged one month and 2 days. 

** Of such is the Kingdom of God." 

Also to the Memory of Elixa, tlie Infant daughter 

of R. Stewart and Mary his Wife. 
Bom 2nd September 1832, died 18th Augt. 1833. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary IVilson Stewart, 

daughter of Robert Stewart, Esq. & Mary his Wife, 

who departed this life 19th December 1822, 

aged 3 years and 4 months. 

Beneath this humble Memorial 

of sincere regret of his Brother Collegians 

lie interred tlie mortal remains of 

John Innes Shank, Ksq. of the Civil Service, 

who died the 2Hth of Sept. 1834, aged 20. 

Not less to tlic deep regret of his relations 

and friends in India, than the irreparable 

bereavment of his parents and relatives at home. 

Sncred to the Memory of IWllliam Fraser, 
the beloved Son of Alfred and Jane Lingham. 
Died 3rd Nov. 1834, 
aged 1 year, 5 months and 25 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

XflOnisa Maria Trotter, the infant daughter of 

Charles Hogg, Esq. and Louisa Fleming his wife, 

who departed this life 1st of October 1834, 

aged 7 months and 10 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. E. S. DaCoata, 

wife of Mr. J. S. DaCosta, who departed this life 

on the 12th October 1834, aged 45 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Joaepk Bennet, 

son of Joseph Marley, Esq. of Moorshedabad, 

who departed this life 6th Dec. 1834, 

aged 6 years and 15 days. 

The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 

blessed be the name of the Lord. 



Sacred to the Memory of R. Barber, 

spinster. Obit. 22d Oct. 1834, ^t. 30 years. 

Beloved of God, called to be saints — nothmg is 

perished of us, only deposited. 

Love never dies, her tried enduring love 
Burnt brightly here, flames at its source above ; 
Patient, died meek, in every trial own'd 
The God all gracious, now that faith is crown 'd 
Fair was his form, it yet shall rise once more 
From earth as lovely, as the mind it bore. 

R. W. 



To tlie Memory of Samuel Robinson, 

son of Peter and Joana Goodall Atkinson, 
bom August 11th 1834, died March 19Ui 1836. 



To the Memory of Captain O. K. Batbie, 

Obit. Ist Sept. 1834, Jit. 36 years. 



VITilliam Pinckney, E^q. 

of the H. C. Scrvitre, Officiating Agent, ^c. &c. 

Mi Kedgeif;e, died Aug. 9, 1834, aged 45 years. 

Au active public servant and an honest man. 



Beneath lie the remains of 
Capuin Ricbard Zi. Ziaws, 

late commander of the ship Dunvegan Castle, 
who died 2d August 1834, aged 39 yeArs, 7 mos, 

leaving a wife and 4 children to lament the 

untimely loss of an affectionate husband and a 

fond father. This Monument is erected 

by his afflicted widow. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
CecUia RoaaUa Ziidiard, 

departed this life, 27th August 1834, aged 
23 years, 1 month and 18 days. 

O. R. QiUanders, Esq. Attorney at Law, 
died 27th July 1834, aged 27 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
IWllliam Meadours Farrell, 

who departed this life on the 16th April 1823, 
aged 53 years and 2 months. 

No venal muse presumes her voice to raise. 
His pupils grateful here record the praise 
Due to the memory of a teacher'f name, 
Who oft of dormant genius lit the flame ; 
Who as the parent bird its young to fly 
Forces on flutt'rin^ wings to brave tbe sky 
And forcing only aids their energy ; 
Would cautious urge the yontbfol minds' ad- 
vance. 
Nor urge in vain, o'er learning's vast expanse, 
In whose warm efforts shar'd an equal part, 
To store the head or mend the youthful heart. 
In whom at once the friends concerned sincere 
The tutor breath'd and breath'd a father's care. 
Tliis humble Monument his pupils raise 
A grateful tribute to their tutor's praise. 



Sacred to the Memory of Pater mTatson, Esq. 

who departed this life 19th April 1823, 

aged 52 years. 

Highly esteemed and very sincerely and deservedly 

regretted with a grateful remembrance 

of his many amiable virtues. 

This Monument is erected to bis Memory 

by his afl'ectionate brother, Alexander Watson. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jessy ^XTelsh, 
who departed thb life, 30 May 1823, aged 46 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of John GKlBaore, Esq. 

who departed this life on 22d March 1823, 

aged 60 years. 



To the Memory of John Forsjth^ 

of the H. C. Civil Service, who died on the 26th 
May 1823, in the— year of bis age. 



Sacred to the Memory of Jnlisiiay 

relict of the late William Morton, Esq. of 

Futtyghur, and sister to Mary Anne, wife of 

A. Uoss, Esq. She departed this life on the 10th 

September 1833, eged 41 years, 

1 month and 11 days. 

'' Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
John Gleland Quthrle, 
Major H. M. 44th Regiment. Bom 2 Ist Julv 
1783, who departed this life 4tb of June 1823, 
aged 39 years, 10 months and 14 days. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



113 



To the Memory of Robert Ross Yonng:, 

3d son of the late John Yoiuig, Esq. of Bellwood, 
who died 21st May 1823, aged 24 years. 

To the Memory of Lieut. IWlUiam Saripent, 
H. M. 44th Regt. who died 6th June 1823, 

aged 26. 

To the Memory of 
Henry Middleton Stemdale, 

late of the H. C. Naval Serrice, died 3d June 
1834, aged 39 years. 

To the Memory of Jane Hay. 

daughter of Captain and Mrs. Sewell, Obit. 

27th June 1834, aged 10 months 22 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Master J. F. Browne, 

son of R. Browne, Esq. died 2d of June 1834, 

aged 1 year, 3 months and 5 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of James Barrett, 

late of Maiden in Essex, who died June 2d, 1834, 

aged 34 years and 6 months. 

Mrs. J. Benjamine, Obit. 27th July 1834, 
iEt. 43 years, 6 months and 15 days. 

To the Memory of Allan Robertson, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 9th December 1835, 

aged 32 years. 

In Memory of 

Charles C. Bolst, 

3d son of Wm. Henry and Mary Bobt, 

Obiit 11 April 1834, 
aged 6 years, 10 xnonths and 27 days. 

To tlie Memory of 
Captain John IVilkinson RoTire, 

of the 31st Regiment N. 1. 
who died on the 8th May 1834, yEtatis 33. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain Thomas X*rinsep, 

Bengal Engineers, 

bom on the 15th September 1800, 

killed by a fall from his horse 23d January 1830. 

TTiis Tablet is added to record the fate 

of a younger brother An^^ostus Prinsep, 

B. C. S. who was born 31st March 1803, and 

died at sea of a consumption 10th October 1830. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Henry Chas. Jackson, 

Obiit 12 March 1830, iEtat 16 years and 8 montlis. 



In Memory of Mrs. Jane McKoy, 

who died July 3d 1830, aged 56 years. 

She was a kind and affectionate mother. 

This Monument is erected as a tribute of 

regard by her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. 

and Mrs Wm. Kemp. 



In Memory of John *«. *«mu, 
Son of Charles Bird, Esq. of Philadelphia, 
who departed this life May 19th, 1830, 
aged 23 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain John Foote, 

formerly Assistant Marine Surveyor to the 

Hon. East India Company, who departed 

this life 7 July 1835, seUtis 70. 

a 2 



Sacred to the Memory of Elisa Susannah, 
the only beloved child of Horatio and 
Eliza Jones, who departed this life 28 

December 1829, aged 17 montlis and 2 days. 

Sacred to buried love ; 

to the Memory of his beloved and 

deeply lamented wife Snuna, 

this Monument is dedicated by her husband, 

William Graham, M. D. She died the 14 

December 1829, aged 24 years. 

In remembrance of Robert Bathorst, Esq. 

late a Senior Merchant iu the 

service of the Honorable East India Company, 

and Collector of Customs at Mirzapore, 

who departed this transitory life on the 3d 

day of November 1821 in the 67th year of his age, 

most sincerely and generally lamented. 

Of this excellent and generous man, 
whose virtues were too consjiicuous to be 
enumerated, on this humble tablet 
(the offering of nndissembled affection 
and esteem) suffice it to say, 
that his humanity and integrity knew no bounds. 
That he possessed all those rare qualities 
which constitute the gentleman, the man of 
refinement, learning and taste ; that he was ardent 
and unalterable in his friendship, and 
admired, honored and beloved 
by all who had the happiness of his aquaintance. 
This humble memorial is inscribed by 
one who was distinguished by Mr. 
Bathurst's friendship and confidence, and 

who feels it the highest consolation 

on so melancholy an occasion to record 

the virtues of a man to whom when alive, he 

is proud of saying, that his obligations 

were endless, and are not forgotten 

now that he U no more. 

Erected by William llussey Websterfield, 1824. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Robert Patterson, M. D. 

Surgeon Bengal Establishment, who departed 

this life at Calcutta on the 9th Dec. 1829, 

aged 45 years. 

To the Memory of Jane Frances, 

the beloved child of Captain Warlow, Engineers, 

bom 14th Dec. 1828, died 28th Dec. 1829. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Jones, 

who departed this life 

11th of November 1829, aged 18 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Charles Hng^h Zng^lis, Esq. 

youngest son of the late Francis Inglis, Esq. 

H. C. Civil Service, Fort Marlborough Estt. 

bom on the 18th August 1811, died on the 

9th November 1830. 

This sincere tribute of esteem and affection is 

inscribed by his brother and sisters. 



Sacred to the Memory of Francis Zn^lis, Esq. 

eldest son of the late Francis Inglis, Esq. 

H. C. Civil Service, Fort Marlborough Estt. 

Bom on the 20th July 1798, 

died with his family by the wreck off the Sand-heads 

of the ship in which they were coming 

to Calcutta, on the 17th June 1826. 

This sincere tribute of esteem and affection 

is inscribed by his brother and sifters. 



IIG 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Caroline Bodri^es, 

eldest daughter of the hite Francis Iiiglis, Esq. 

U. C. Civil Service, Fort Marlborough Estt. 

bom on the SIst May 1796, died on the 

17th September 1829. 

This sincere tribute of esteem and affection 

is inscribed by her brother and sisters. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Fendall, Esq. 
member of the Supreme Council, Bengal, who 
departed this life November lOth, 1825, 
aged 63 years. 

Here lyeth the remains of 

Captain John Daniels, of the Country Service, 

who died 21st of Mardi 1824, aged 34 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Jane, wife of 

M. Cockbum, 
Obit 12th January 1824, iEtat 27 years 

and 2 months. 



Also of her son Michael, 
Obit 18th July 1846, iEtat 26 years, 11 
months and 12 days. 

Here lyetb the body of Mr. Qeorgpe Homett, 
who departed this life at the age of 45 years, 
on the 14th January A. D. 1824, 
most deeply lamented by his family. 

Sacred to the Memory of Colonel John Paton, 

Commissary Gex^eral of the Bengal army, 

Obiit 16th of February 1824, aged 63 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Zioaisa Oeorg^iana, 
tiiird daughter of Dr. R. M. M. Thomson, 
and Mary his wife, who died on the 8th October 

1826, aged 1 year, 7 months and 23 days. 

** Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid 

them not, for of such is the kingdom of God.*' 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Bliaabeth Cnaarton, 

died Ist April 1824, aged 42 years, 3 
months and 17 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Bentley, Esq. 

who departed ttm transitory life on the 

4th March 1824, 

in the 67th year of his age. 

This tablet has been placed by Mrs. Anne Bentley, 

as a tribute of aiffection 

to the Memory of the deceased 

John Bentley. 

who was distinguished during his life for many 

eminent virtues and for an active and 

intelligent mind, ennobled by a truly warm, 

generous, social, and sincere heart, which rendered 

him esteemed and respected in an extensive 

circle of society where his loss is 

sincerely regretted. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Alexander Bentlejr, 

the only son of John Bentley, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 22d November 1825, 

at Kedgeree, where his remains have been 
interred and a Monument erected by his disconso- 
late mother Mrs. Anne Bentley, who as an 
additional tribute of maternal affectionate regard 
for his memory, has placed this Tablet on this, 
hii father's, Monument. 



To the Memory of Benjanin Per|tnas«ii, Esf 
who died 3d March 1824, aged 47 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Josepha, the wife of Simeon Henry Boileau, 

who departed this life on the 28th Jane 1829, 

aged 35 years. 

God rest her soul. 



To the Memory of OaroUne Bracken, 
the daughter of James and Susan Minchin. 
Obiit 13th September 1829, aged 18 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Bobert Moaelcy Thomas^ Esq. 
who departed this life on the 20th July, 
in the year of our Lord 1829, aged 42 years 
6 months. A kind husband, an indulgent pareni 
His widow, Ann Trepaud Thomaa, erected this 
Monument in grateful and tender 
remembrance of him. 



I, wife of John Middleton, Engineer, 
sleepeth here in Jesus, waiting for her final call. 
She exchanged mortality for life, September 
24th, 1829, aged 29 years. 
" She being dead, yet speaketh." 

Sacred to the Memory of the late 

^ Jamea Maffhintoah, Esq. 

bom at Tain, N. B. 4th Sept. 1802, died at 

Calcutta 15th August 1829, 

aged 26 years, 11 months and 11 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. BKarjr Bowe, 
who departed this life on the 11th of Sept. 1829 

aged 55 years. 

Sacred to the Merooiy of 
Captain IXnUlam Basteate. 

who departed this life on the 19th July 1829, 

aged 38 years. 

This tribute of affection is inscribed by his 

afflicted widow, Lydia Eastgate. 

Sacred to the Memory of Sophia, 

wife of John Dowling, Esq. died 11th June 1829 

aged 45 years, 4 months 15 days. 

Also to the Memory of John l>owliisg>, Esq. 

died 30th June 1829, aged 63 yean and 1 month 

** What I say unto you, I say unto all, watch.'*— 

Mark xiiL 37. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Alexander Gibb, Esq. 

Senior Member of the Medkal Board of this 

Presidency, died the 4th of June 1829, 

aged 68 years. 

If a life of truth and bmievolence afford an 

humble hope of acceptance by oar €k>d, let us 

forbear to mourn his flight to the throne of mercy. 

Love, gratitude and veneration fm!>ylm the 

memory of the good, and will preserve the name 

of Alexander Gibb, when this stone shall mingle 

with the dust it now protects. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Patrick Bobert Sinolair, H. C. Marine, 
who was drowned off Middle Point 19th of Aug. 
1832, aged 21 years, 8 months, 13 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Captain J. P. 
late of H. M. 38th Regiment, who died on the 12th 
April 1824, most deservedly regretted. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



117 



Thomas Alsop, an active Mafirwtrate, 
and highly esteemed member of society, 
died nth April 1824, aged 50 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Ghraee Metcalfe, 
wife of Thomas Theophilus Metcalfe of the Civil 

Service, and eldest daughter of the late 

Alexander Clark, of Ruthven, N. B. Bom 16th 

July 1795, Obit. 14th April 1824. 

Sacred to the Memory of IWllliam, 

son of William Paton, Esq. of the H. C. Civil 

Service, who departed this life on the 3d May 

A. D. 1824, aged 3 years, 8 months and 1 day. 

A most promising and engaging child ; the pride 

and the joy of his parents, who fondly, but 
Alas ! vainly hoped, that the sweet and fair blos- 
som would have timely ripened into fruit. 
Their sorrows and affliction may be unspeakable, 
yet softened and subdued by the conviction 
that their departed darling, is happy in 
the realms of bliss. 



Sa cred to the Memory of 
IXTilliam Robertson, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 20th April 1824, 
aged 48 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Penelope Katherine, 

the infant daughter of the Rev. Thomas Welby 

Northmore, and Katherine his wife, who died 

on the 25th day of January 1825, 

aged one month and 23 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Qeorg^ McOoivan, £sq. 
Surgeon, who departed this life July Ist, 1824, 

aged 34 years. 

His attached friends have erected this Monument 

as a last tribute of respect and in testimony 

of their sincere regard and esteem. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut.-General Sir John Macdonald, K. C. B. 

who after an honorable and faithful service 

of more than half a century, died on the 

29th May 1824. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Peter Adolp Torckler, Esq. 

died 18th November 1824, aged 76 years, 

3 months and 25 days. 

Also to tbe Memory of 

Mathew QodSrej Torckler, Esq. 

died 7th December 1824, aged 17 years, 

2 months and 27 days. 

James Hare, Esq. 

eldest son of Doctor James Hare, died 20th May 

1824, aged 19 years and 8 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. IVilliam Jenninf^, 

died Ist May 1824, aged 50 years. 

Master MTiUiam R. Sansnm, 

died 19th July 1824, aged 4 months 9 days. 

Mrs. E. Sansnniy 
died 14th Nov. 1824, aged 16 years 10 months. 

Miffi Anna Emelia Black, 

died 23d January 1832, aged 13 years, 

5 months, 5 days. 



Miss Sarak Jennett BUek, 

died 8th Nov. 1832, aged 7 years and 11 months. 

Erected by her mother Mrs. Sarah Black. 

■ * 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. James Black, Branch Pilot, 

who departed this life on the 2l8t July 

1842, aged 44, 

and his son-in-law, Mr. IWllliam Duncan, son of 

the late Doctor Joseph Duncan, 45th Regt. 

who died at Gazeepore 28th June 1844, 

aged 25 years. 

Reader, pause and reflect for awhile. 
This is the sure place to rest from toil ; 
With sickness we were sore opprest 
Kind death has eas'd us, we lie here at rest. 

This tablet is erected in testimony of great affec- 
tion for her father and husband, by Louisa 
Matilda Duncau. 



Sacred to the Memory of Ann, 
the wifie of Frs. Jas. L'Herondell, who departed 

this life 2d May 1824, aged 18 years and 
5 months. This Monument is erected to her Memo- 
ry as a token of regard by her afflicted husband. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Thomas Yonngp, (SeDior Branch Pilot,) 

who departed this life on the 30th April 1824, 

aged 50 years. 

Here lies the tenderest husband, ftither, friend. 
His life with goodness mark'd ; with grief his end ; 
His mind was calm. Oh may his soul have rest 
And he who others bless'd, himself be bless'd. 
He gave to every Christian virtue scope. 
And what his practice was, is now his hope. 

In Memory of Jnlia Panline, 

daughter of Mr. Joseph Young, died 17th July 

1841, aged 1 year, 4 months and 22 days. 

This lovely bud so young and fair, 
Called hence by early doom. 
Just came to shew, how sweet a flower. 
In paradise will bloom. 



In Memory of Joseph Henry lUTalter, 

son of Mr. Joseph Young, 

died 25th February 1844, aged 9 years, 

7 months and 8 days. 

Sweet child, and hast thou gone — ^for ever fled ! 
Low lies thy body in its grassy bed ; 
But thy freed soul, swift bends its flight thro' air, 
Thy heavenly father's gracious love to share. 
Weep not for me dear mother, for I am happy 

stiU, 
And murmur not at our great Father's will ; 
Let not the blow your trust in Jesus, shake. 
Our Saviour gave and it is His to take. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. 'William Wraineh, 

late keeper of the Calcutta Jail, who departed 

this life on the 13th day of June in the 

year of our Lord 1824, aged 35 years, 

3 months and 6 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Anne fin&ily Jane, 

the infant daughter of William Fairlie Clarke, 

who departed this life in Calcutta the 9th of 

November 1828, aged 2 years, 

2 montiis and 12 days. 



118 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Tliis Monument is erected in Memory of 
Ed^rard Pag^lar, 

Commander of the ship *' CashnuTC Merchant," 

by a friend, who, during a voviu^e from Ent^^huid 

to India in 1H22. experienced his attentions, 

and esteemed his worth. Obit. 8th 

November 1828, JEtaX. 35. 



Sacred to the remains of Sdveard Bamett, 

and erected by friends tuincerely attached to him. 
He died November I2th, 1828. 



In Memory nfMT. A, IjiTing^ston, Knq. 

senior })artner oft he Firm of Messrs. TuHoh & Co. 

who died at CiUcutta on the 13th day of Nov. 

1H28, aged 29 ye^rs. 

This monument is erected by Ids 

friend, James Coull. 



Snored to the Memory of 
Matilda Emily Ann, 

wife of Lieut.-Col. J. A. Hodgson, Surveyor 

General of India, who departed this life on the 

28th Nov. 1828, aged 32 years. 

** Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall 
see God. Blessed are the dead which die in 
the Lord, for they rest from their labours." 



In Memory of James Fulton, 
son of Cajjt. and Mrs. R. B. Fulton of the 
II. C. Bengal Artillery. Bom the 24th Jaimary 
1824, died the 13th December 1828. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Hunter Clarke. 

the infant son of Samuel and Isabella Clarke, 

who died 17 th January 1829, aged 3 years 

and 5 months, 

Sincerely regretted by aU who knew him. 
Sweet flow'r, farewell ! too fair for earth I 
Brief space to us thy charms were giv'n ; 
He who bestowed thee, knew tliy worth, 
And took thee to himself in heav'u. 



To the Memory of Charles Frederick, 

son of Charles Bennett and Jane his wife ; 
died September 2d, 1828, aged 2 years, 

2 months and 23 days. 
*' Of such is the kingdom of heaven." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
VITilliam OUphant, Ksq. 
Captain of the Bengal Artillery, who died 27th 

August 1828, aged 38 years. 

Tliis Monument is erected by his affectionate 

mother and brothers. 



To the Memory of Maria EUen, 

daughter of Capt. J. E. Debrett, bom 2Gth Nov. 

1827, died 22d August 1828. 

Sucred to tlio Memory of Charlotte Railey, 

died 8th Aug. 1828, aged 3 years, 

6 months and 22 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
VTilliam Henry Twentyman Esq. 
who died 2()th April 1842, aged 48 years, 

5 months and 12 days. 

As sincerely regretted as he lived beloved 

und rsti'cmed. Theso lines are inscribed by his 

afiliclcd widow us an humble tribute 

to de]>ai'ted worth. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elisabeth Mary Twentyman, 

who departed this transitory life on the IGth Jan. 

A. D. 1834, aged 36 years. 

She was a virtuous wife, a tender mother, a pious 

Christian, and now it is hoped rests with the 

*• Spirits of the just made perfect." 

Here lies also her infant daughter . 

EUsabeth Sophia, 

died 6th of August 1828, aged 1 year, 

9 months and 15 days. 
*' Of such b the kingdom of heaven." 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander IVataon, Esq. Indigo Planter, 

who departed this life on Sunday 

the 12th of October 1828, aged 45 years, 

9 months and 25 days. 

Long time with sickness I was sore oppress'd. 
My prayers were heard, God kindly gave me rest. 
He ever proved himself an honest and virtuous man, 
A good husband, a most generous heart 
and a sincere friend. 

" The Lord gave and the Lord bath taken away, 

Blessed be the name of the Lord.'' Amen. 

This monument has been erected by hu much 

aftlicted widow, Mary Watson, who after quitting 

this world hopes to be interred in the 

same grave with her husband. 

And alHo tu the Memory of Mrs. Mary mTatson, 

who departed tliis life the 4th January 1832, 

aged 41 years, 5 months and 7 days. 
Lamented by her friends for her gener(»ity, 
kindness of disposition and many good qualities. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. I«ei|fh ^nrattle Jacob, 

who departed this life on the 22nd Jane 1824, 

aged 24 years. 

He was an affectionate husband, a dutiful son, 

and a sincere friend. 

This Monument is erected to his Memory by his 

much afflicted widow, Jane Jacob. 



In Memory of lUTm. Moor* Bolot, 

Infant son of Wm. Henry and Mary Bolst. 
Obit. 1 1th July 1824, aged 6 months 18 days. 

In Memory of Georf^imna Bolst, 

Infant daughter of Wm. Henry and Mary Bolst. 

Obit. 23rd August 1832, aged 1 year, 

3 months and 13 days. 

In Memory of Jaa. Y. O. Bolst, 

4th son of William Henry and Mary Bi>lst. 

Obit. 10th April 1834, aged 5 years, 

5 months and 23 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Vrillian& Dennuui&i Esq. 
Attorney at Law, and his two children, 
John and Ellen, May 1832. 



Sacred to tiic Memory of J. Brapor, Esq. 

who departed tliis life on the 20th July 1824, 

aged 50 years. 

Deeply regretted by his wife and children. 



Sar.retl to the Memory of Mr. J. F. Simpson, 

who departed this life on the 29Ui Sept. 182G, 

aged 20 yean. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



119 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Joseph Simpson, 

who departed this life on the 17th July 1824, 

aged 64 years. 

Dissolv*d in earth in sad remembrance end. 
The social ties of husband, father, friend ; 
Yet these surviv'd, shall tnith preserve to fame 
The chaste memorial of an honest name, 
And to ae;es bear his worth approved 
Who died lamented as he lived beloved. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Simpson, 

who departed this life on the 22d Feb. 1844. 

This tablet is erected by her aiilicted daughters, 

in Memory of an affectionate and much 

lamented parent. 



Sacred to the beloved Memory of 

Charles Herd, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 15th August, 1839, 

aged 48 years. 

How sweet to sleep where all is peace, 
Where sorrow cannot reach the breast ; 
And pain is luU'd to rest. 
Escap'd o'er fortune's troubled wave. 
To anchor in the silent grave. 

This tablet is placed here by his much 
aMicted widow. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Sarah Marg^aret Middleton, 

who departed this life on the 25th Oct. 1840, 

aged 34 years. 
'* The righteous shall be had in everlasting re- 

mcuibrance." 

Tliis Monument, as a tribute of affection, is erect- 
ed by her disconsolate husband and children. 



In Memory of Ensign Thomas Hutton, 
Bengal Native Infantry, Obit. 3rd Dec. 1824. 

^tat xviii. And of his Nephew James, 

the son of George and J. E. Mackillop, Obit. 

l€th July 1833, aged 11 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Eleanor Mary Marg^aret, 

beloved wife of Richard Williams Walters, 

H. C.'s Marine, who dej)arted this life 

on the 7th April 183G, aged 22 years, 

and 10 days. 

"VMien sorrow weeps o'er virtue's sacred dust 
Our tears become us and our grief is just ; 
Such are the tears he sheds who mournful pays 
This last sad tribute of his love and ])raise ; 
Who mourns the best of wives and friends com- 
bined, 
W^ere female softness met a manly mind ; 
Mourns but not murmurs, weeps but not despairs ; 
Feeb as a man, but as a christian bears. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mary, 

wife of Conrad Laiuc, who departed this life on 

the 25th July 1824, aged 27 years, 

2 months and 13 days. 



Also to Bridget, her affectionate sister, 
wife of J. W. Higgins, aged 31 years. 
They were lovely and pleasant in their lives and 
in their deaths they were not divided. 

Also in Memory of Conrad Xflaine, 
a man who died on the 10th of December 1831, 
at the Sandheads, on board the H. C. P. V. 
♦• Sea Horse," aged 47 years. 



To the Memory of P. O. M. Xfaine, 

who departed this life on the 11th April 1839, at 

Midnapore, aged 16 years, 7 months and 29 day*. 

A fine promising lad nipped off in the 

prime of youth and just as hthad commenced 

his career in life. 



Sacred to the Memory of Harriet. 

the beloved and affectionate wife of William 

Higgins, who departed this life on the 1st 

September 1824, aged 30 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Edi^eard Hall, 
who died on the 1st April 1835, aged 40 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Harriet Chalcraft, 
who died 1st September 1824, aged 21 years, 
5 months and 14 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Tnmer, 
died the 8th October 1824, aged 54 years. 
This Monument as a tribute of affection is erected 
by his disconsolate widow, Anna Turner. 

In Memory of Charles KnoTvles, 

third son of Charles Knowles Robison, one of the 

magistrates of Calcutta. Bom 2d September 

1827, died 22d July 1828. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain James Bontein, 
of the Ist Regt. Light Cavalry, who died on the 

24th October 1828, aged 38 years. 

Never man died more regretted by his brother 

officers. — St. John c. xiv. 25, 26. 



M. S. 
Harriott Trevor Charlotte, 

the daughter of Adeline and James Pattle, 
Natal. March, Obit. June 1828. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Butterworth Bayley, 

Infant son of Henry Vincent and Louisa Bayley, 
born and died at Calcutta 25th October 1839. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
IViUiam Bntterworth Bayley, 

Infant son of Henry Vincent and Louisa Bayley, 

born the 27 th September and died the 2d of 

October 1841, aged 5 days. 



Sacn^d to the Memory of Qeorg^ Corrie, 

the beloved child of John and Maria Jackson, 

bom on the 4th September 1839, departed this life 

on the 19th September 1841, aged 2 years 

and 15 days. 

*• Of such is the kingdom of heaven." 



Sacred to the Memory of Marg^aret, 

the infant child of John and Emily Craigie, taken 

from them the 2d of July 1828, aged 13 days. 



Sacred to tlie Memory of Maria, 

wife of Theodore Dickens, who lies with two of 

their infant sons in this grave. She died on tlie 2d 

of October 1834, aged 31 years. Her husband 

outlives her ; he has one son left. His 

hope is that this parting is not for ever 

Sacred to the Memory of Edward Francis, 
third son of Theodore and Maria Dickens, 
born 31st July, and died 2d August 1834, 
aged 2 days. 



120 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieutenant-Colonel Mills ^iThosBaa, 

46th Regt. N. Infantry, who departed this life on 

the 10th of May 1828, aged 44 yean. 

• 

Sacred to the Memory of 

\iriUiam BHaxard Smitli, 

the son of Henry Smith, Esq. and Hester Bevis, 

his wife, of Camberwell Grove, Surry, 
Natal 18th April 1794, Obiit 10th July A. D. 1835. 

In Memory of lUrilliam Tate. Esq. 
Attorney at Law, died 19th May 1828, ^Ut 35 
years and 3 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mary Snsannali, 

died at Calcutta on the 31st May 1828, 

aged 8 months. 

Also of IWllliam Morley, 

died at Mymunsing on the 14th April 1822, 

aged 2 years and 3 months. 

Also of Elixabetli Anne, 

died at Barrackpore on the 17th April 1825, aged 

3 years and 1 1 months ; 

children of William Hallows Belli, Esq. and of 

Sarah, his wife. 

Forgive blest shades the tributary tear. 
That mourns your exit from a world like this ; 
Forgive the wish that would have kept ye here. 
And stay'd your progress to the seats of bliss. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. SUsabeth Qeraldina, 

the affectionate and beloved wife ofMathew 
Uvedale. Bom the 7th of April 1807, and depart- 
ed thifi life on the 10th April 1828, aged 
21 years and 4 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Rachel Q. XJTedale, 

who died the 7th of July 1828, aged 

6 months and 19 days. 

To the Memory of Mrs. Sarali Davis, 
wife of Isaac Davis, Hair Dresser, who died the 7th 

of June 1828, by a sudden attack of Cholera, 

at the early age of 31 years, leaving a disconsolate 

husband to lament her irreparable loss. 

Also in Memory of Mr. Zaaac Davia, 

died 18th November 1836, aged 59 years. 

Mrs. Sooma, 
died 13th June 1825, aged 29 years. 



Sacr ed to the Memory of 

Joseph lUTatta. Esq. of Houreh, 

who departed this life 30th March 1828, 

aged 42 years and 10 months. 

This Monument is erected by his disconsolate 

widow, as a small tribute of respect to his Memory. 

** An honest man is the noblest work of God.'' 



Qeorgpe Twisden, died Dec. 9, 1820, 

aged 12 hours. 
Isabella SaTiflrny, died July 13, 1824, 

afrcd I year 10 months. 
Frances Twisden, died July 25, 1824,] 

aged 6 hours. 

Blanche Twisden. died June 4, 1827, 

aged 1 year 10 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of Sliaa iKickhart, 

the leoond daughter of W. D. S. Smith and 

the beloved and affectionate wife of Frederick 

Paschoud, who departed this life the 8th of Aug. 

1825, aged 23 years and 3 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of the inftmt daughter of 

Frederick Paschoud, 
bom the 6th May and died the 25th Aug. 1825. 



Sacred to the Memory of Slisa Helen PAschond, 

bom the 23d October 1823, and died the 19th 

July 1824, aged 8 months and 26 days. 

'' Suffer little children to come unto me and for- 

bid them not, for of such is the kingdom of 

heaven.'' — Luke, Chap. 18. v. 16. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
John Talbot Bhakespaar, 

who died on Board the H. C. ship **Ro8e," 

on the 12th April 1825. 

In testimony of their sincere regard for the 

sterling qualities which distinguished this lamented 

individual, his surviving friends have erected 

this Cenotaph, as a tribute of his worth and a 

memorial of their regret. 



To the Memory of MaSkw» ^^ of 

J. T. Shakespear, Esq. of the Bengal CfrO Service, 

died 29th September 1824, aged 40 years. 



n 



Suffer little children to come unto mc, for of 
such is the kingdom of heaven, and he took them 
up in his arms, put his hands upon them and 
blessed them." — Mat. x. 14,15. 



Sacred to the Memory of John Vang^nUn, 
late Livery stable keeper of Sooteridn Lane, 
who after a lingering and pahifol 
illness of nine months, which he bore with exem- 
plary patience, departed this life on the 13th 
December 1824, resting his hopes of a joyfbl re- 
surrection on the merits and mediation of hu 

Redeemer, aged 49 years. 

He was an affectionate husband, a loving fkther, 

and a sincere friend. In his public d^Mcity 

he has done his duty and given every satisfsction 

upon all occasions. He was much erteemed and 

respected for his upright conduct, 

by all who knew him. A friend 

to all, and enemy to none. 

His early death involves in grief severe, 

A loving partner and ten children dear ; 

The former, while die mourns her widow'd fivte 

Beholds the latter and laments their ttite. 

Too soon alas, deprived of their best earthly gaide. 

Their hearts are torn with grief, whiefa oranot soon 

subside. 
But tho* with perils their conditions fraught. 
To rest on Crod their hearts were early taught ; 
And deeply as their loss they do dolors 
They trust for safety in His mercy's slofe. 
Tho' low in earth, Ms form *8 decayed 
My faithful husband, my belov'd is laid ; 
Constantly you kept a wife's true heart 
To all but her as cold as now thou art. 
To name your tenderness ill betits her grief 
What was her bliss, can now give no n&Uef. 
Your widow mourns, the rest let fHendship tell ; 
Fame spread your worth, your wife she knew it well. 
This modest stone what few vain marbles can, 
May truly say, here lies an honest man. 

Ijanguage cannot adequately express the grief of 

the afflicted widow, who erected this monument as 

a small token of the deep and lasting regret 

of herself and numerous funily. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



121 



S acre d to the Memory of 

Mr mniliam Bartholomew, 

died 16th Feb. 1819, aged 25 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut-Col. JolmDeConrcy,ot the Bengal Army, 

who departed this life, 10th of December 

1824, aged 62 >ears. 

Sacred to the Memory ot Mrs. Amelia Courtex, 
who departed this life ou the 27th March 1829, 
aged 16 years, 4 months aud 23 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Muss M. V. Vaog^nlixi, 
died 9th May 1834, a(;ed 13 years, 
8 months and 1 9 days. 
Erected bj her affectionate sister, E. S. VauguUn. 

Sacred to the Memory of Gilson Rovee, Esq. 

who died on the 3d December 1824, aged 52 years. 

'* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 

blessed be the name of the Lord." 
Tliis Monument is erected by his affectionate 
widow as a last tribute of respect to his 
lamented memory. 



To Emily, wife of 
Captain A. Horsburgh, B. N. I. 
and daughter of Charles Hodgkinson, who departed 
this life on the 3d June 1825, aged 25 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

CaptaiQ Charlea VTilson, 

Assistant Commissary General on the Madras 

EsUblishment ; Obiit 13th October 1824, 

iEtat 43 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Henry Qaiven, 

of Greenwich, in the county of Kent, died January 

I7tli 1S34, aged 29 years and 2 months. 

Aa affectionate brother, a sincere friend, and a 

truly honest, upright man. He lived respected 

and died lamented by all who knew his worth. 

Saered to the Memory uf Maria Felicia, 

the beloved wife of Charles Been Boyce, who 

dbpartad this life July 17th 1833, aged 29 years 

and 4 months. 
To a truly pure and virtuous mind, with a mild and 

amiable disposition she combined all the 
fm 4 f f""g qualities of a most affectionate, faithful 

wife, and a tender mother. 

ReUgioiis without ostentation, meek, artless and 

benevolent, " each kindred virtue dwelt 

widiin her breast." 

Bdoived, best of wives, parallel'd by few, 
In meekness, goodness, tenderness, adieu I 
Adieu, Maria, till the day more blest. 
When, if permitted, I with thee shall rest. 



Also to the Memory of Caroline 
danghtw of the above, who died November i7th, 
1827, aged 1 year and 4 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of Bliaa Hornby Ziaw, 

the effectionate daughter of 

M. Law, Esq. and Welhelmina, his wife, 

wbo departed this life on 11th May 1828, aged 19 

years twenty-six days. 

To the Memory of Bo|^ IWlnter, Esq. 
Barrister at Law, 
wlw died on die 24tfa May 1828, aged 39 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Adaline Blunt, 

bom 30th August 1834, died 16th February 1835. 

" Suffer little children to come unto me, 
and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom 

of heaven." 



Sacred to the Memory of H. Blundell, Esq. 

who died 1 1th June 1825, and of his wife, 

A. J. M. Blundell, 

who died 1st August 1826. 

This Monument is raised to the sacred Memory of 
Henry VTebater, 

Attorney of the Court of King's Bench at 

Westminster and of the Supreme 

Court of Judicature at Fort William in Bengal, who 

departed this life on the 13th day of June 1825, 

aged thirty-three years, two months and two days. 

Here rest the mortal remains of 

Fances, wife of James Webster, 

who died June 7th 1825, aged 34 years. 

In death lamented as in life beloved, her sorrowing 

husband inscribes this sad tribute 
of fond affection to the Memory of an amiable and 

virtuous wife. 



Here lies interred Charles Henry, 

the infant son of C. and E. Stuart, of Calcutta, 

born 8th July 1824, died 30th July 1825. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut -Col. H. R. Browne, H. M. 87tli Rei^. 

who departed this life on the 5th June 1825, 

aged 39 years. 

This tomb is erected by his brother officers as a 

sincere token of their esteem tor his memory 

and deep regret at his loss. 

Sacred to the Memory of Charles VTiltshire, 

died 25th April 1825, aged 46 years. 

Also of Susan his wife, died 3d November 1825, 

aged 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
a virtuous mother, 3l8t March 1825. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Benjamin Deverell, l->q. 

who departed this life J 2d January 1825, 

aged 30 years. 

" The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 

blessed be the name of the Lord.'' 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Thonaaa Sheppard, 

late Senior Branch Pilot in the Honorable Com- 
pany's Bengal Marine Establishment, who de- 
parted this life on the 1st October 1825, 
aged 51 years and 10 months. 
Leaving a disconsolate widow and five children to 
lament his irreparable loss, and by whom this 
Monument is erected in testimony 
of their affection. 
Why on this mouldering tomb express his praise, 
Whose name can build what time can ne'er erase. 



I 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Thomas WiUiam KinfTi 

(Merchant and Accountant,) who departed this 

life at Calcutta on the 9th day of March 
A. D. 1825, deeply lamented by his family and 
friends, aged 46 years. 



vn 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



S«cr<>d to the Memory of Henrj Ma&nin|f| Esq. 

of the H. C. CWU Service, who departed this 

Ufe 22d of August 1825, at the early age of 27 

years and four months, leaving a disconsolate 

wife, who erects this Monument as a small mark 

of her unalterable affection, and a tribute of 

grateful remembrance to her ever beloved and 

much lamented husband. 



In Memorv of IfOnlMi, 

wife of 6. Dick, died 12th Nov. 1845, Mtmt 31. 

Alto Frances, only daughter of Jot. Dick. 

died 1 7th April 1842, age 29 yevrt ; 

and Gko. lUTard Dick, son of Geo. and Loui»a 

Dick, died 4th April 1843, aged 19 month* 

and 7 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of T. C. FitxQerald, 
Obit. 7th Sept. 1825, iEUt 36 years. 

Ah ! in this silent mansion of the dead 
The relics of my much lov'd Tom is laid ; 
Sleep dear departed worth in hopeful bliss, 
Till trump seraphic calls to endless peace. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Aane Xflindaey Speed, 

who was bom on the 17th Oct. 1823, and died 

on the 25th August 1825, aged 1 year, 

10 months and 8 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of D. VfT. H. Speed, 

who departed this life on the 4th June 1841, 
aged 50 years and 18 days. 
In life beloved, in death lamented, this tomb is 
erected by his affectionate widow. 

Here lies also the body of 

Qrace Ziindeay Speed, 

freed from all her worldly care and sorrows, 

died on the 17th of April 1844, aged 55 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mary ZSdvrarde, 

the aJBTectionate wife of William Thacker, Esq. 

Surgeon, who departed this life 19th 

August 1825, aged 26 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
two beloved infants, children of lient. -Colonel 

Bryant, and Marv Anna hi^ wife. Bdvrard, 

who died the 12th of June 1825, aged one month. 

A nd Mary Anna. 

who died the 15th of August 1825, aged 

1 year, 10 months and 5 daya. 

Also a third beloved infant. Iionlsa OadOf^aa, 

who died on the 7th of Oct. 1829, aged 6 months 

and 20 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John HUl, 

of the H. C. Marine, who departed this l^e 

on the 28th June 1825, aged 64 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Aane Ziavvrenaon, 
deceased 30th June 1825, aged 22 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of John Dick, Esq. 

of the H. C. Bengal Civil Service, bom August 

18, 1797, died July 20, 1825, aged 27. 

Thy brother, John, erects this stone 
O'er thy untimely grave, 
He came unnoticed and alone 
Thy bed with tears to lave. 

No more he'll see thy noble form 
Nor hear thy voice of mirth : 
No more will beat thy heart so warm. 
Now still and cold as earth. 

But trusts thy spirit lives above, 
Which Jesus died to save, 
Thro' whose atoning blood and love 
We all must pardon crave. 

Thou wert of five the youngest, John, 
Yet first on death's decree, 
Now I am the youngest thou art gone 
Yet first may follow thee. — Abercromby. 



In Memory of Mr. Josh. Dick, 
who died 26th August 1825, aged 40 years. 

Also his son Mr. T. O. Dick, 

who died at Bankipore, 1st October 1837, 

aged 29 years and 8 months. 



Mnjor VTilliam fiCian, 

late Secretary to Government in the Military 

Department, died the 15th June 1825, 

aged 44 years. 

This Monument is erected by some of hia oldest 

and most intimate friends in testimony of the 

sincere respect and esteem entertained by them 

for his character in public and private life, as 

an officer and a gentleman. 



Tn Memory of John. 

infant son of Mr. John Harris, and Caroline his 

wife, died 13th OcL 1834, aged 3 mondia 

and 5 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Catherine Hanis, 
wife of Mr. John Harris, 3d daughter of the late 

Henry Hall, Esq. of Carlisle, who died the 
22d June 1825, sincerely regretted, aged 22 years 
3 months and 10 days. 



Also to the Memory of 
Miss Harriet Hill Harris, 
who departed this life 13th January 1839, 
aged 14 years, 10 months and 23 daya. 



Underneath are the remains of Miss Jaae SBagper, 
who departed this life 16th Oct 1834. 
aged 23 years. 
Erected to her Memory by a sineere 



In Memory of the Rev. J. IiawMMay 
Pftstor of the Baptist Church, CireoJar Road, 

who died Oct. 22d, 1825, aged 38 yeara. 
His life was useful and his death triamphant. 



Also Marj Bntterworfh IiawsOAy 

who died Dec. 2d, 1825, aged 14 yeara. 

** Be ye also ready." 



Sacred to the Memory of Raehel , 

widow of the bite Henry William Money of the 

H. C. Civil Service, who departed this tifb on 

the 1st January 1826, aged 28 yeara. 

Also to the Memory ot her infaut daughter Sl__ 

who died on the 20th October 1825 at the 

age of 1 year and 6 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of JnUay daaghter of 
William Henry Oakea, aged 4 months and 27 dayt. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



123 



Sacred to the Memory of Wm. Jackson, Esq. 

Attorney at Law, who departed this life at 

Bud^ Bud^ on the 14 th December 

1825, aged 24 years. 

Also to the Memory of his brother 

Captain Samuel Jackson, of the Madras Army, 

who died at sea near Aleppey 

in April 1826, aged 27 years, 

Hie sons of the late John Jackson, Esq. and 

nephews of Randle Jackson, Esq. Barrister 

at Law, and a Bencher of the Hon. 

Society of the Middle Temple. 



Sacred to the Memory of *•«»«,, 

the beloved son of Henry axxd Ellen Elixa Clarke, 

who departed this life 12th Dec. 1837, aged 

8 years, 11 months and 29 days. 

To the Memory of Marf^aret. 
the affectionate wife of B. S. Ellis, 
died Sept. 27th 1826, aged 24 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Ljaxnin Hardtuan, E^q. 
died 20th January 1826, aged 38 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. Patrick Dndjreon, of the 14th Regt 
Commanding Sylhet Local Battalion, 
died 6th October 1825, aged 36 years. 



N.I. 



Sacred to the Memory of Lieut -Col. N. Bucke, 

who departed this life on the 8th Sept. 

1825, aged 43 years, 

borne a share in the conquest of Aracan, 

lie fell a victim to its baneful climate and 

to the ardent zeal for his profession which 

distinguished him through life. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Marj Jane Mansfield, 

died 10th April 1826, aged 27 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss Smma Beg^ble, 
who died 8th September 1825, aged 22 years. 



Here rest the mortal remains of Henrietta, 

wife of William Tomkyns, and eldest daughter of 

W. D. S. Smith, died 7th January 1826. 

aged 21 years, 7 months and 15 days. 

This Monument is e rect ed to the Memory of 

Colonel Gkorge mrilliam Hessingpi 

eldest son of the late Colonel John Hessing, who 

departed this life 6th January A. D. 1826, 

aged 44 years, deservedly lamented by all who had 

the happiness of his acquaintance, and 

more immediately by his family to whom he was 

an affectionate parent and sincere friend. 

" Blessed are the meek in spirit for they shall 

see God." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut Charles Smith, of the 27th Re?t. N. 
died 19th February 1826, aged 28 years. 



I. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Charles James Fox, Esq. 

of Calcutta, Merchant, who departed this life 

on the 23d Sept. 1825. aged 34 years. 

TUt Monument is erected by his brother as a last 

tribute to his worth. 



late 



Sacred to the Memory of mmiiam Fox, Esq. 

late of Calcutta, who departed this life 

on the 19th September 1833, 

■ged 34 years and 6 months. 

lUfl Monument is erected by his beloved wife 
•a a memorial of her affection. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Sarah Ann fiUsa Dorrett, 

who departed this life on the 1st day of January 

1826, aged 6 years and 1 month. 

This Monument is erected by her afflicted parents 

as a mark of their affection for her many 

amiable and endearing qualities. 

Sleep soft in dust, await th' Almighty's will, 
Then rise unchanged and be an angel still. 



Sacred to the Memory of Thomas Brae, Esq. 
Itbt of Rnttonpore, Kisenaghur, died 20th 
September 1825, aged 69 years. 

" Deadi cannot make his soul afraid, 
" ^K^iose God is with him there ; 

Soft is the passage through the shade, 

And all the prospect fair." 



Sacred to the Memory of Charlotte BCarjr, 

the beloved wife of Fry Magniac, Esq. 

who departed this life in Calcutta on the Ist ot 

November 1825, aged 28 years, 3 months 

and 12 days, deeply regretted. 

" I know that my Redeemer liveth and that he 
shall stand at the latter day upon the earth, and 
though after my skin, worms destroy this body, 
yet in my flesh shalll see God." — Job ziz. 25, 26. 



4t 



Sacred to the Memory of ZSmma, 

daughter of Lient.-Col. Humfrays ox the 

Bengid Engineers, and wife of Major William 

Stuart Beatson, Deputy Adjutant General, 

who died on the 16th of September 1825, 

tendsjs after the birth of her fourth child, in 

the 29th year of her age. 

irirtues and her talents, her highly cultivated 

nund ; her playful liveliness of temper and the 

generous warmth of her disposition, 

endeared her to her friends while her devoted 

attachment as a daughter, sister, wife and mother, 

made her the comfort and delight of her (now 

desolate) husband and of those near relations 

who lament her untimely death, but with 

the humble hope of rejoining her hereafter. 

a 2 



Sacred to the Memory of 

John Rycroft Best. il. C. Civil Service, 

who departed this life 23d December 1829, aged 

29 years and 7 months. 

"An honest man is the noblest work of God." 

Also to the Memory of Oeor^ana Maria, 

the infant daughter of John Rycroft and Georgiana 

Best, who died on the 28th February 1826, 

aged 7 months and 22 days. 



Siu:red to the Memory of 
Mr. James Depstell, ot tlio H. C. Marine, 
died 23d November 1825. aged 63 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Aug^ostus Henry Saunders. 

born 25th April and died 11th December 1825, 
aged 7 months and 16 days. 



124 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Saered to the Memory of 
MiM J«n« Sllsa Maclean, 

who departed this life 27th February 1826. 
This amiable young lady had only arrived the short 

space of 5 months and 1 1 days from 
England, when she fell a victim to one of the fatal 

diseases incident to the climate of India. 
She was in life respected and beloved for her many 

excellent qualities ; so in death ishe is deeply 
lamented by her parents, relatives and friends, who 
will ever bcwnil her irreparable loss. 
Aged 17 years, 4 months and 20 days. 



Sacred to the Memory tjf 



Sacred to the Memory of VT. K. Jackaon, Esq. 

Obiit 4th December 1825, ^Etat 69 years, 

8 months and 5 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. \irilliam Baaon, Branch Pilot, 

died 16th December 1825, aged 60 years. 

Mary Baaon, relict of the Inte W. Bason, 
died 23d October 1837, aged 65 years. 

Helen Baaon, wife of T. Bason, died 29th May 
1837, aged 34 years. 



Sac red to the Memory of 
Capt. mruiiam Stennard Skitter, 
who departed this life 23d May 1827, aged 41 years, 
8 months and 23 days. 



To the Memory of Marg^aret Nevirton. 

of Althorp in Northamptonshire, wife of Charles 

Newton, an Assistant Surgeon of this Presidency, 

who died at Seetapore in the kingdom of Oude, 

on the 24th August 1834, and w^as interred 

here on the 7th April 1836. 

A Iso Blisabetli Marg^aret lUTard Nenrton , 

the infant daughter of the above, who died 

on the 22d March 1836, 

aged 21 months and 25 days. 

This last tribute of affection was raised by the 

bereaved and disconsolate husband and father. 



IXnUiam Ziow Cantor, 

died 4th April 1836, aged 6 months and 1 day. 



Sacred to the Memory of J. C. mTatson, Esq. 

of Gazeepore, Merchant, died 9tl) May 

1827, aged 42 years. 

A tender and kind husband, an affectionate 

father and a sincere friend. 

This monument is erected by bis afflicted widow. 



Beneath this <)tone lie the remains of Blixa, 
the affectionate wife of W. G. Grieff, 

died in childbed 1st Augt. 1827, 
aged 22 years, 7 months and 26 days 

Rest Eliza dear, rest in peace. 
Secure from vanity and noise. 
For here thy earthly sorrows cease 
From hence commence thy heav'nly joys. 
Short was thy span — 'tis past — 'tis gone ; 
Early thou reach 'd'st the appointed goal, 
Freed from its clogs and upwards flown 
Angels received thy spotless soul. 
This Monument an afflicted husband reant, 
To prove his love and record his tears. 



the beloved daughter of Thomas Rdd and Helen 

Eliza Davidson, born the 25th August 

1827, died the 10th of November 1843. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

daughter of Thomas Reid and Helen 

Eliza Davidson. Obit 15th April 1827, 

aged 2 years, 8 months and 13 days. 

" Let them come unto me and forbid tfaem not 

for of such is the kingdom of heaven." 



Sacred to the Memory of Miss M. A. Vanristell, 
who departed this life 16th July 1827, 
aged 15 years, 3 months and 16 days. 



Under this tomb are buried the remains of 

a beloved child, Fannj Bhedden, 

whose parents erect this Monument to mark 

the spot Sacred to their infant's Memory. 

Into God's care they resign dieir babe, who was 

bom 15th October 1824, died 7th May 1827, 

aged 2 years, 6 months and 23 days. 



Sacred to the Memoir of 
ZSUsabetli Marj Haaaaraon, 

infant daughter of Lieut. H. B. Henderson, 
died 2d April 1824, MteX 11 months 27 days. 



Sacred to t he Memory of 

Captain IWllliam Blinaej, 

who departed this life 20th November 1823, 

aged 44 years. 

This Monument is erected by his affectionate wife. 

" Behold the Lord taketh away, who can hinder 

him ? who will say unto him what doest thou ?" 



This last and sorrowftil tribute marks the grate of 

Mrs. Mari^arat Xinsay, 

who (if those that knew her (est can judge) 

resigned her spirit to Giod on December the 6th 

1813, aged 21 years and 10 months. 

The infant daughter of 
William and Mary Anne Kinsej, 



Charlea Baaet Jones, died April 3rd 1819. 



Sacred to the Memory of Capt. Gkorya 
late commander of the ship " Robarts," and 
formerly of the H. C. Service, who departed this 
life 6th April 1820, aged 36 years. 



To the Memory of Mr. 

who departed this life on the IGtfa Sspt. 

1810, aged 58 years. 
He was a most worthy and honest man. 
Man on this stage is a frail imperfect creature, 
but an honest man is the noblest work of natort. 



To the Memory of Mrs. Harriot OliallMt 

who departed this life, Dec. 23d» 1809, 

aged 17 years; 

and Mr. John OkallMi 

who departed this life, Jnly 19^ 1819, 

aged 35 years 2 months. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



125 



Sacred to the Memory of a yirtaous and affec- 
tionate wife, a fond and tender mother, 
Mrs. Henry Jas. Chalke, 
who died the 25th July 1817, aged 
23 years and 9 months. 

She left the world without a tear. 
Save for her husband and children dear ; 
To heal their sorrows, O Lord, descend 
And to them erer prove a friend. 



In Memory of EUsa Sarah, 

the affectionate child of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. 
Chalke, died 18th April 1845, 
aged 5 years and 22 days. 

And of Sophia Caroline, 
who died 30th May 1846, aged 4 years 
and 20 days. 

Hope looks beyond the bounds of time, 
When what we now deplore, 
Shall rise in fall immortal prime. 
And bloom to fade no more. 

Tlien cease fond nature — cease thy tears. 
Religion points on high, 
There everlasting spring appears. 
And joys which cannot die. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Qeor|^e Peters, 

who departed this life 10th October 1814, in the 

44 th year of his age. 

Near this spot lie the remains of 
James Rayner Siddons, 
bom 24th April, died 19th August 1818. 
** Of such is the kingdom of God." 



Sacred to the Memory of Ann Broders, 

The wife of Mr. James Broders, 

who departed this life 18th May 1822, aged 19 

years and 3 months. 

Of excellence a pattern here is laid ; 
Nature's great debt in humble hope she paid. 
By nature form*d for every social part. 
Mild were her manners and sincere her heart. 



AIm Zijdia Broders, 

daughter of Mr. James Broders, a most dutifal and 
affectionate child, aged 10 years and 3 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of George Dnckett, 
who departed this life on the 13th February 1817, 
in the 34th year of his age, much regretted. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Hall, 
who departed this life 17th January 1817, aged 54 

years and 10 months. 
" Behold and see if there be any sorrow like unto 

my sorrow. — Sam. 1 chap. 12 verse." 

Jziacribed by her affectionate children, as their last 

lad Uibute, Charles and Celia Brodie. 



M. S. 



J. C. Burton, Mereaioris, Conjutris dilecta, 

Qua dam van is vitae officus Funge batar egre- 

gie Filia uxor matrona mater familias 

Pia tenara casta fnige ante diem eheu abrepta 

Propinquis cognatis amicis Deaiderium at conjugi 

Tarn gravi domua clade Saudo solo 

ptrpetuamsoUicitu dinem Atqne mae roremreliqiut. 

Annoa Nat« xzxii. ObC Decembri 26, 1816. 



J. la. mmeVmrUr, Obiit 12 Oclober 1816, 
iEt. 4 years and 7 months. 

Miss J. R. MaclKrhirter, 

Obt. 11th September 1820, Mt, 1 year and 
11 months. 

And Miss F. BE. MaclKrhirter, 
Obt. 12th September 1820, Mt, 3 years. 
*' Of such is the kingdom of heaven." 



Sacred to the Memory or Sd. Henry Molony, 
bom 21st August 1820, died 12th 
October 1821. 



To the Memory of 
Master James Xtidiard, 

Son of Richard Lidiard, Indigo Planter, 

who departed tliis life on the 2d day of Sept. 

1826, aged 14 years and 10 days. 

From all the varied ills below 
Safe doth my Jimmy sleep ; 
His little heart no pangs doth know, 
His eyes no more shall weep. 



tt 



tt 



Of such is the kingdom of heaven.' 
Here lie the remains of 
Charles Hodghinson and Anne Elisft, 
children of William and Anne Ryland. 
Charles died 16th June 1834, aged 1 year, 

5 months 11 days. 

Anne died the 13th July 1834, aged 3 years, 

6 months 3 days. 

'* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Hollow, 

the youngest daughter of the late 

Dr. Henry Buckley, of London, the beloved wife of 

Mr. Robert Hollow. Born on Monday the 19th 

December 1805, died on Sunday the 19th 

September 1830, aged 24 years, 9 

months and 2 days. 

Excellantissimo Sexus. 

As a record of conjugal affection, this Monument 

is erected by her grateful and 

afflicted husband. 

O ! early snacth'd from all who held her dear, 
As friend, wife, mother, she was matchless here ; 
Virtue like her's to earth is seldom giv'n, 
Too good to dwell with us, she's gone to Heaven. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut. Bdward S^ott, of H. M. 59th Regt. 

who died the 26th December 1815, aged 25 yeara. 

This Monument is erected by his brother 

officers as a mark of their esteem. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Henry Ohastenay, E^q* 

of the Bengal Civil Service, and iMvate Secretary 

to the Marquis of Hastings, 
Governor General of India. Obiit 27th May 1822, 

An. j£tat xxviii. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Bdward Molony, Esq. 

of the Bengal Civil Service, and Deputy Secretary 

to Government in the Territorial department, 

Obiit xviii. January 1830, An. ^tatxzxvi. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss Jsae Sdmnnd, 

who departed this life Itt Sept 1822, aged 2 

yean and 9 montha. 



126 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of T. BE. F«rqvliar, Ettq. 
died Uth July 1831, aged 25 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of If aney Gonaalvesy 

bom the Ist Nov. 1799, died the 3d Oct. 1821, 

on giving birth to her firstborn son, who also 

reposes on her side, aged 21 years, 

1 1 months and 3 days. 

This Monument is erected to departed virtue by 

her husband Victoriauo Gonsalves. 



Sacred to the Memory of Slimabeth, 

the wife of Samuel Smith, who departed this life 

at Calcutta on the 18th December 1821, 

aged 24 years. 

Resigned in all things to the will of the Almighty, 

Her afflicted husband bows submissive to ^e 
decree that has deprived him of the mother of his 

infant daughter, an affectionate wife, and an 

amiable companion, after a short but happy union 

of twenty months. 



Here also lie interred the infant remains of 
laydia Marianne Sno^r Strettell, 

bom the 19th August 1822, died the 
28th November 1822. 
Lovely in death so on the verdant plain. 
Falls the fair flower overcharged with rain ; 
Thus early transcient pure as snow new driv'n. 
She sparkled, was exhal'd, and went to Heav'n. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Oharles Matthew Strettell, 

a lovely, interesting and beloved child, bom the 

17th July 1819, died the 4th Oct. 1822. 

This Monument of affection is raised by his 

afflicted and bereaved parents. 

Beneath this rugged Monument, 

There sleeps the sweetest innocent 

That e'er with tender passions warm'd 

A parent's heart, or smiling charm'd. 

His wit mature, his rosy cheeks. 

As the op'ning blossoms gay. 

Or the star when morning breaks ; 

Heaven saw, and snatcb'd his soul away 

Amidst its cherub forms to shine 

Who waa like them so lovely and divine. 

Died of fever, 2d October 1835, 
IVederick, 

•on of the late Rev. John W. Astley, late Vicar 
of Quinington, Gloucestershire, aged 16 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. S. P. Zio^rder, 

who cUed on the 17th March 1837, aged 25 years, 

10 months and 27 days. 

-Afflictions sore long time I bore. 
Which wore my strength away. 
And made me long for endless rest 
That never will decay. 

This Monument is erected by her affectionate 
husband, Thomas Lowder, Engineer. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
the late Samuel STaaa, 
a native of Wales, who departed thia life on tha 
10th Febmary 1817, aged 48 years. 
By nature open, liberal and humane, but 
misfortune overtook him in his latt er age. 
Isaiah liv. Ch. 8. 
'' In a little wrath I hid my face from diee, bat 
with everlasting kindness will I have mercy on 
thee, saith the Lord my Redeemer." 
O may the Almighty God your soul rest in peace. 

For here thy earthly cares and troubles cease. 

This is erected in tribute by his affectionate and 

disconsolate widow. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr Bdward Sattarthwalte, 

late Midshipman Ship ** Lady Campbell," 

Capt. G. Betham, died 26th September 1825, 

aged 17 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. ...m. M^w»i.wm, 
of H. M. 46th Regt. who departed this life on the 

28th October 1826, aged 50 years. 
This tomb is erected by her son, Samuel Scottock, 
Serjt. H. M. 46th Regt. 



In Memory of HITm. St. John. 

infant son of Jno. and Elmily Becher, died 30th 
January 1836, aged 3 months 11 days. 

Cut down like a flower. 
" In the midst of life we are in death.'* 

Sacred to the Memory of Oharlotl^ Beekar, 

who departed this life on the 14th day of 
July A. D. 1818, at the early age of 23 yean. 

Ye, who here tread the gay fimtastic 

round of pleasures dear delights, one moment 

pause. Behold the record of the yoong, the 

gay, the innocent, low laid in kindred dost, 

and Oh ! reflect how short, how frail, 

the thread of human life ! And learn to live that 

yon may die to Gk>d. 



I 



Henrj Ooz, died on the Bth Feb. 1816. 

Aged 1 year, 7 months and 13 days. 

Erected by Ann W. B. Cox. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. BSair OoOsIt, 

the eldest daughter of Mr. Moran, 
who died on the 22d Dec. 1822, aged 35 yean. 

Also in Memory of Bdwmrd Moraa, Eaq. 

Deputy Commissary of Ordnanoe, 
who departed this life on tiie 12tli July 1827. 
in the 7 ist year of his age, deeply l*^«tf>n^ 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Rose Onrren, 

died 27th July 1826, aged 32 years. 

Erected by her affectionate daughter, 

Miss E. P. Cnrreu. 



Sacred to the Memory of ZMwbellay 

wife of Mr. James Walters of Lucknow, 

died 15th Sept 1825, aged 41 years. 

She lived excellent in every relation of private life. 

and died a pious Christian. 



In Memory of Mr. Gaor(« Oroipa, 

died 2 Ist December 1826, 

aged 37 years, 7 montfaa and 21 days. 

Tins Monument is erected as a tribate of 

affection to the best of hAen, 

by his dutiful son, J. 6. Crowe. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Itotltla Biitlar,^ 
relict of Mr. George Crowe, who departed 
this life 18th Jane 1837, 
aged 43 years, 1 month and 9 days. 
This simple tablet is raised to the Memory of 
one of the best and fondest of modiers, by hev- 
bereaved daughter, A. S. Crowe. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



127 



In Memory of Mr. D. Xi. Thornton, 

who died 29th Augt. 1822, aged 27 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Henrietta Xiavinia, 

daughter of H. Adams, Esq. who departed 

this life on the 5th Aagust 1843, 

aged 8 months and 29 days. 



Also to the Memory of ZZenry Adanui, Efiq. 

who departed this life on the 17th May 1845, 

aged 33 years, 3 months and 19 days. 

Also to the Memory of Mary ZZarriety 

daughter of the late H. Adams, Esq. died 25th 

May 1846, aged 4 years, 7 months and 29 days. 

Whate'er we fondly call our own 
Belongs to Heav'n's great Lord ; 
The blessings lent us for a day 
Are soon to be restored. 

'TIS God that lifts our comforts high, 
Or sinks them in the grave ; 
He gives, and when he takes away. 
He takes but what he gave. 

Then ever blessed he his name, 
His goodness swell'd our store ; 
His justice but resumes its own, 
'Tis ours still to adore. 



Sacred 



Esq. 



Here lies deposited the mortal remains of 

Adeline Sarah, the infHnt daughter of 

T. Steers, Esq. of the Native Hospital, 

who departed this life on the 3d May 1821, 

aged 2 years, 4 months and 18 days. 

TiB not for her but for yourselves ye mourn ; 

To happier regions is the spirit fled ; 

Nor ought of her, but mould 'ring clay is dead ; 

In heaven she lives. 

Where you will one day meet, 

And joy eternal make your bliss complete. 

In Memory of VTilliam Mackintosh, 
~ 13th October 1825, aged 27 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

T. J. la'IZerondell, Esq. 

who departed this life Feb. 15th 1831. 

aged 46 years. 

Ihia Monument is erected as a token of 

affection, by his two afflicted sons, 

F. M. L. and L. J. L. 



To the Memory of Lieut. 8. F. IVard, 

of H. M. S3d Regt. who died 4th September 

1816, aged 26 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain Robert Samnel Feildex\ 

who departed this life 3d July 1826, 

aged 31 years, 1 month and 13 days. 

Erected by hb brother, James 

Feilder, Branch Pilot. 



Mn. J. Sparrow, aged 45 years, 1835. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Sab-Conductor Oharlea newton, 
^ho departed this life the 28th July 1822, 
aged 22 years, 
^^mwmg a disconsolate widow and one child 
^ ^ttplore his loas. This tomb is erected by his 
belofed wife, Susanna Newton. 



cred to the Memory of Oharlea Sanndem. 1 
third officer of the H. C. Ship •♦ Minerva,*' 
who died the 8th Dec. 1815, aged 25 years. 
Erected as a mark of esteem by his brother officers. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Anne Ha^rkina, 

who departed this life 1st August 1816, 

aged 47 years. 

'' I know that my Redeemer liveth." 

Here lies the infant son of 

Mr. Thomaa Bnrt, 

bom and died 8th November 1831. 



Sacred to the Memory of John Johnaon, 

(late Proprietor of the Star Press,) who departed 

this life on the 11th July 1817, aged 43 years. 

Sacred to tlte Memory of Mrs. A. ZS. Johnson, 

relict of the late Mr. John Johnson, of the 
" Star Press," who died on the 18th August 1819, 

aged 38 years. 



Beneath are deposited the mortal remains of 
Major General John Oarstin, 

of the Corps of Engineers, who departed this life 

in the sixty-fourth year of his age, on the 

16th February 1820, 

Having established to his own memory in an 

honorable reputation justly acquired by a long and 

meritorious discharge of every duty, a 

more commemorative Monument than this tablet, 

which the affection of his children have 

inscribed in remembrance of his worth and in 

testimony of their gratitude and deep affection. 

The deceased was an officer, brave, 
zealous and able ; as a son, husband and father 

invariably kind and affectionate ; as a man 

distinguished by inflexible integrity, and ever 

ready beneficence. 



This edifice is erected by a sorrowful son 

to the affectionate memory of his mother, 

Mr». Amelia Cooper, 

who departed this life the 3d Sieptember 1822, 

aged 41 years. 
Our hearts are fastened to this world 

By strong and endless ties. 
While every sorrow cuts a string, 
And urges us to rise. 

To the Memory of Master Thos. HIT. Bolst, 
died 29th July 1818, aged 15 years, 3 months and 

14 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut. Patrick Panton, 12th Regt N. I. 

who died 25th January 1813, aged 26 years. 

This tomb is erected as a testimony of 

affectionate regard and esteem by his 

brother, W. Panton. 



Sacred to the Memorv of Mrs. Mary Orichton, 
who died on the 27th April 1819, aged 70 years. 

To the Memory of Caroline Sophia, 

the beloved wife of Charles Cowles, who died 

June 5th 1833, aged 33 years. 

Also Caroline Isabella Cowles, 

their daughter, who died December 1st, 1826, 
aged 1 year, 1 month, 24 days. 



i 



128 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Beneath are deposited the remains of 
Lieut. -Coloriel Valentine Blacker, 

Companion of the Bath ; of the Light Cavalry 

on the establishment of Fort Saint George. 

During ten years, Quarter Master General of the 

Madras Army, 
and subsequently Surveyor General of India. Obt. 
iv. February MDCCC XXVI. yEt. xl. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Blacker was, an GHficer 
distinguished alike for professional ability, for 
public zeal, for private worth, and for 
manliness of character. In testimony thereof his 
friends and comrades have caused this Monument 
to be erected to his memory. 



To the Memory of Maria Anij Debrett. 

born 13th April 1795, died 25th June 1826. 

This stone is erected by her brother. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Catherine Rodriig^ea. 

the wife of Mr. Anthony Rodrigues, ana daughter 
of the late Andrew Perroux, Esq. This 
amiable and virtuous lady departed this life on 
Monday the 1st May 1826, aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Ag^es, the beloved wife of 

Lieut. -Colonel C. S. Fagan, who departed this life 

on the 19th April 1826, aged 36 years. 
Than whom, for the exemplary discharge of her 
duties as a wife and a mother, no Woman was ever 

more eminently distinguished. In every 
other endearing relation of life, she was beloved 

and respected. 

The remains of the infant son of 
Lieut. J. A. Fairhead, 28th N. I. 1827. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Robert Oharlea CKeTenson, 

of H. M. 59th Regiment, who departed this life 
at Calcutta, on the 4th December 1826, aged 40 
years, leaving a widow and five helpless children 
to deplore the loss of the best of husbands 
and fathers. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain A. Stewart, 28th Regiment N. I. 

died 28th August 1826, aged 42 years. 

Rodney Ootterell Statham, 

died 5th August 1826, aged 56 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Francis St. Qeorg^ Farqubarson, Esq. 

who departed this life 4th May 1826, 

aged 26 years. 

This Monument was erected by his four brothers, 

resident in India, as a mark of their love and 

esteem for his person and regret for his loss. 



Sacred to the Memory of Obarlea Blaney, 

who departed this life at Calcutta on the 21st of 

July 1827, on Saturday, most deeply and 

deservedly regretted by a numerous circle 

of friends, aged 52 years, 7 months 

and 15 days. 



To the Memory of Poynts Ste^rart, Esq. M. O. 
died 16th July 1827, aged 27 years 10 months. 
And of his son IVilliam H. O. Stewart, died 
26th July 1827, aged 2 years 9 months. 



To the Memory of Thonuui Samest Driver, 
died 4th June 1827, aged 14 years 1 montii. 

In Memory of Thomas Thonisony Esq. 

Indigo Planter, who departed this life 19th July 
A. D. 1827, aged 23 years, 2 month sand 3 days. 

As a token of her affection, this Monument is 
erected by his disconsolate widow. 

** He that believeth in me, though he were dead, 
yet shall he live/' 

To the Memory of Matilda, 
the affectionate wife of Charles Mackenzie, Esq. 
died Sept. 30th 1827, aged 39. 

In Memory of Thonuui Ed^srard, 

son of Major Thomas and Louisa Maddock, 
bom 28th June 1826, died 8th August 1827. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

JoHn Burton Itonf^, Esq. 

who died 3l8t August 1827, aged 24 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander Freer Faleoner, 

son of the late Alexander Falconer, Esq. of Bel- 

nabarry, who died at Calcutta on the 29th 

•October 1827, aged 14 months. 



To the Memory of m^mmr,, 

wife of Captain John Uullock, died on the 9th 

April 1836, aged 32 years. 

In the bitterness of unutterable sorrow, this 

Monument b erected by her fondly attached 

husband and her five darling children, as a last 

mournful tribute of their most siTeetioiute 

and just veneration for her beloTed Bftemoiy. 

** But we shall go to her." 

Also of Captain John Iinsconbs ^V^ood, 

and his wife and child, who perished in command 

of the " Quebec Trader,'' in a tyfbon is the 

China Seas, in July 1835. 

Sacred to Hhb Memory of 

Lieut. Frederick Qrotd, 

of the Bengal Artillery, and Aide-de*Camp to die 

Governor Genersd ; sixth son of Gteorge 

Grote, Esq. of Badgemore in Oxfordshire, who 

departed this life April 21, 1828, aged 21 years. 



Sacred to tho Memory of Mrs. , 

wife of J. Tosh, Esq. who departed this lifel9th 
Dec. 1827, aged 21 years. 
Erected by her husband, James Tosh. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Blisaboth HfTood, 
who died the 20th November 1827| aged 39 yean 

and 10 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

the beloved daughter of Greorge and Anne truster, 

who departed this life on Uie 10& February 

1828, at the age of sixteen, 

deeply and desenredly lamented. 

That being the dispensation of him whose prorid- 

ence are ever kind, and wise and just, has <y^fM 

her early, not prematurely to himsdf. 

" For of such is the kingdom of Heaven." 



M.S. 
Thomas Fsttls, 

Obit, iii A igust 1826, .fitat zix. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



129 



Stered to the Memory of Jane If uthall, 

eldest daughter of Colonel John Nuthall, Bengal 

Light Cavalry, died Ist January 1827, 

aged 30 years. 

He is gone before. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain Henry Blake Pridham, 

rho departed this transitory life on the 15th Oct. 

A. D. 1826, sincerely regretted by his circle 

of relatives and friends. Bom Nov. 21st, 1791, 

aged 31 years, 10 months and 25 days. 

'* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken 

away, blessed be the name of the Lord." 

Also Oeorf^ Hamilton Gray, 

the beloved child of George and Eliza Slacfcran, 

born 14th August 1840, Obit 5th May 1843. 



Sacred to the Memory of C. T.^ETans, Esq, 
who departed this life on the 9'th September 

182G, aged 49 vears. 

This monument is erected by his affectionate 

and beloved wife. 

'* I know that my Redeemer liveth and that he 

will raise me up at the last day." 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Susannah Bush Cotton, 

the beloved wife of Thomas Forrest Cotton, 

bom 2l8t August 179C, and died after giving 

birth to a stillbom babe, 14th March, 1827. 



to the Memory of a dearly beloved son of 
J. M. and C. Heritage, 
who departed this life, 24th September 1826, 
aged 2 years, 9 months and 26 days. 

A child reposes underneath this sod, 

A diild to mem'ry dear and dear to God ; 

Rejoice, yet shed the sympathetic tear, 

Mathias Heritag^e lies buried here. 



taered to the Memory of Master James IVilliani, 
•on of J. M. and C. Heritage, died 8th August 

1827f aged 5 months and 4 days. 
'* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 

blesaed be the name of the Lord." 

Also of Charles Edward, 
infiut son of J. M. and C. Heritage, died 
nth Bfarch 1828, aged 1 montli 25 days. 

And of John Francis, 

eldest aon of J. M. and C. Heritage, 

who departed this life 20th October 1832, 

aged 14 years and 9 months. 

God forbid his longer stay ; 
God recall'd the precious loan ; 
God hath taken him away. 
From our bosoms to bus own. 
Surely what he wills is best ; 
Happy in his will we rest. 

Sacred to the Memory of her dearly 
lamented husband, 
•^HaMattiaas Heritag^e, Kranch Pilot, 
died 28th Oct. 1833, aged 42 yearsi, 
. . 9 months and 20 days. 

"* ^blet is dedicated by his disconsolate widow, 
^ record the virtues of an aflectionnte and 
'oving husband, a fond and tender father, 
^Qd a most generous and warm friend. 



Here lie the tenderest husband, father, friend, 
His life with goodness mark'd with grief his end ; 
His mind was calm, oh may his soul have rest, 
And he who others bless*d, himself be bless'd. 

And also of their youngest son, 
Henry 'William, 
died 4th June 1833, aged 2 years 
9 months and 22 days. 
" Suffer little children to come unto me 
and forbid them not, for of such 
is the kingdom of Heaven. 



•I 



In Memory of 
Bmmeline Felicia Gkorg^ana Heritag^e, 

died 7th June 1842, aged 8 years, 

9 months and 4 days. 

Her gentle manners and mild disposition endeared 

her to all who knew her, particularly her 
disconsolate mother, who is left: to bewail her loss. 

'* Take the child, no longer mine, 
Thine she is, for ever thine." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Caroline Olaudine Heritag^e, 

the beloved daughter of Mrs. C. Heritage, 
who departed this life on the 7th August 1846, 
aged 14 years, 6 months and 17 days. 
Though oblivious dews settle fast on thee now, 
There's one heart shall forget thee never ; 
And the stroke that shall end all my sorrow below, 
Shall unite us again for ever. 

*' It is the Lord, let him do whatseemeth 
him good." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
IMrs. Ann Catherine Pearson, 

wife of Mr. George Pearson, H. C. Marine, 

who departed this life the 23d December 1826, 

aged 26 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Eleanor, 
the beloved wife of William Graham, 
M. D. H. C. S. Obit. 2d October 1826, 
^tat 34 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Frederick Iiyona, 

son of Frederick and Eleanor Binns, 

died 19th July 1828, aged 9 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Charles Mellis, 
son of Frederick and Eleanor Binns, 
bom October 1st, 1824, died Feb. 11th, 1833, 
aged 8 years, 4 months and 11 days. 

Andrs'w Yonng^, the son of 

Henry and Frances Faithful, died 3d Sept. 

1824, aged nine months. 

Here are deposited the remains of Anothn Mary, 

daughter of Henry and Janet Buruey. 

She was bom at Ava, 13th Fcbraary 1832, 

and died at Calcutta 27th March 1833, 

following her sister to the kingdom of God. 

Mary Maing^, 

daughter of Henry and Janet Burney, born at 

Siam 13th March 1826, died at CalcutU 

22nd Feb. 1827. 

Poor little traveller. 



Sucred to the Memory of Mr. Malachi Ziyons, 

who departed this life March 4th, 1827| 

^t. 55 years. 



130 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of John Saaford, 

of the Bengal Civil Service, 

who departed tliis life the 23rd February 1827, 

aged 50 years. 



Sacre'l to the Memory of -Mr. Thomas Eastman, 

who departed this life 20th July 1834, 
aged 36 years. 

Let me remember that the portin": sisrh 
Appoints the just to slumber, not to die ; 
The starting tear, I'd check, 1 wtmld kiss the rod 
And not to earth resign liim but to God. 

Here lieth aho 
IVTa^tf^r IVilliam Hu^h Eastman, 
died 27th Dec. 1830, ajred 1 month and 5 days. 
I shall go to them, but they shall not return 

to me." 



ti 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Helen Eastman, 
wife of Mr. Thomas Eastman, ^ho departed 
this life on 14th March 1827, aged 25 years, 

4 months and 13 days. 
** Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord, 

even so gaith the spirit, for they rest from their 

labours." 



In Memory of Marf^aret, 

wife of David Tliomson, Junr. 

Obit. 15th February 1832, iEtat 26 years. 

When sorrow weeps o'er virtue's sarrcd dust, 
Our tears become us and our grief is just ; 
Such were the tears he shed, who grateful i)ays 
This last sad tribute of his love and praise ; 
\\Tio mourns the best of wives, and friends com- 
bined. 
Where female softness met a manly mind ; 
Mourns but not nmrmurs, sighs but not despairs, 
Feels as a man, and as a Christian bears. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann GaU, 

wife of T. M. Gale, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 28th April 18^1, 

aged 33 years and 5 months. 

A ho her son, Master Henry KMnQton ChJ«, 

died21st March 1827, aged 9 months and 16 days. 

This Monument an affectionate husband and fa- 
ther rears. 
To prove his love and record his tears ; 
Beneath this tomb, the beloved wife and infant lies. 
Till the last signal summon them to rise. 
Belov'd they lived, and lamented fell. 
None better than the afflicted sorrowing heart caa 
teU. 



To the Mrmory of David Thomson, K«q. 

born May 23rd 1750, died January 2Uh 1827, 

aged 70 years, S months and 1 day. 

Panse reader ! Here is laid a man of years, 
A long, long traveller tliro' a vale of tears ; 
He *8 gained the point to which the living tend, 
Of rich and poor, behold tlie journey's end. 

He was a good and ])ious Christian, a faithful 
and affectionate husband, a fond and tender father, 

and a sincere friend. 
Long time with sickness he lay sore oppressed 
Kind death has eas'd him ; he lies here at rest. 



Sacred to the Memory of Qeorg^e IVard, 

the infant son of Robert Saunders, Esq. of the 

Civil Service, and of Eliza Wallace, his wife, 

who departed this life on the 17th February 1827, 

aged 8 months and 10 days. 

Blisa mTallace Saunders, 

mother of the infant, whose remains are here 

deposited, departed this life at Singapore on the 

27th of JSeptcmber 1829, in the 28th year of 

her age. 

" Her ways were ways of pleasantaesSi and all 
her paths were peace." 



In Memory of my dear husband 
John Daniel Bristow, 

late Commander of the Bark '* Will watch." 
Died November 15th, 1841. 

J. C JD. 



To Gilbert Henry George Sllioty 

the beloved son of the Honorable J. £. Elliot, C.S. 
and Amelia Elliot his wife, died 8th March 
1827, aged 7 years, 6 months, 10 days. 
God will redeem my soul from the power of the 
grave, for he shall receive me." 



4< 



In Memory of Anna Meria, wife of 
James Black, Branch Pilot, 
who departed this Tife on the 18th March 1833, 

aged 35 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. M. SL — w., 

eldest daughter of James and ElisEab^h Black, 

who departed this life on the 28th Sept. 1833. 

aged 23 years, 8 months and 15 days. 
She was an aflcctionate wife and a loving mother ; 
I her loss is deeply regretted by all who Imew her. 
I ** Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord." 

1 the Memory of Mrs. Anna tHee d, 

mother of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Black, 

who died 11th December 1830, aged 75 yean. 

In Memory of Xionisa MatOda, 
wife of James Black, Branch Pilot, 
who departed this life 1 1th of December 1838, 
aged 21 years, 11 months and 13 days. 

To the Memory of Elisabethi 
I wife of James Black, Branch Pilot, who departed 
this life on the 17th of February 1827, 
aged 37 years. 

Also, Bdwin Joseph Black, 

the infant son of Elizabeth and James Black, 
aged 17 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Major General Charles Btuatt. 

who departed this life 31st Mardi 1828, 

aged 70 years. 



Sncred to the Memory of HfTiia. Doriay Esq. 
of the Civil Service, a Puisne Judge of the Co^ 

of 8udder Dewanny and Nisamut Adawlut* 
who departed this life on the 26th Dec. 18^^ • 

aged 37 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of M^w^y 
daughter of Captain Jas. JBontein, latfieu. Lt. C^' 
who died 20th April 1828, aged 13 yays* 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



131 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Ranald McDonald, 
of the ship " Alexander/' who departed this life 

dtii of January 1828, aged 28 years. 

TTiis Monument is erected by the owners of the 

" Alexander" as a gratefiil tribute for his 

faithful and valued services. 



In Memory of Mary, 

pious and affectionate wife, the only and much 

loved sister of the above, who died at sea 

5th July 1829, aged 23 years. 

This tablet is inscribed by her husband, 

Lieut. John Bartleman. 



Alexander Mnrdock, 

died 9th January 1828, aged 23 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Henry Panlin, Esq. 
solicitor to the Hon. the East India Company, 

Obit. March 7th, 1836, iEt. 43. 
This tablet is erected to the Memory of an affec- 
tionate &ther, by his son and daughter. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Caroline Mary, 
the affectionate wife of Henry Paulln, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 8th of Aug^t 1833, 

aged 37 years. 

In Memory of Margaret, 

the beloved wife of Jas. Gregory, died April 

16th, 1836, aged 25 years. 

Also their infant daughter, died June 3d, 1836, 

aged 11 days. 

To the Memory of 

Henry Donnithome, 

late a Lieut, in H. M. 44th Regt. who departed 

this life at the Presidency on the 28th day of 

August 1834, in the 35th year of his age. 

Here lien the remains of Elizabeth, 
the wife of John Spence, who departed this life 

on the 15th Sept. 1833, aged 33 years. 
This flrail memorial is placed here by her hus- 
band, whom she sincerely loved. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Misfi Maria Heviretsoni 

bom on the 2d April 1821, died on the 

21st September 1833. 

This sincere tribute of affection is inscribed by 

William Inglis. 

Phillip Oeorg^e Fmshard, 
Obit. 15th Sept. 1833. iEtat 26. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr<«. Elisabeth Ankbrose, 
wife of Mr. James Ambrose, ship builder, 
who departed this life on the 18th Sept. 1833, 

aged 28 years. 
She is gone where the wicked cease from trou- 
bling, and the weary find eternal rest. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Qeor^^e Chester, Jn. Esq. 
who departed this life on the 31st of Aug. 1833, 
deeply lamented, aged 20 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Edward Cripps, 

of the H. C. Marine, who departed this life August 

24tb, 1833, aged 30 years, 5 months and 1 £iy. 

a 2 



And Ann, his beloved wife, who departed this Ufa 

19th September 1833, aged 22 years, 

4 months and 12 days. 

" Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord." 

To the Memory of 
Wniiam Plutner W'ilson, 

who died 1st August 1833, aged 26 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. T. Gtibsoti, 

who (lied 21st June lt'33, aged 3fj year*. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

JMi<s Mary Mc Arthur, 

who departed this life on the 14th of 

July 1833, as^ed 22 years. Erected by 

her aftectionate brothers. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
ZZannah Maria Braddon, 

the beloved wife of W. Braddon, Esq. 

B. C. S. who died on the 8th August 

1833, in the 43d year of her age. 

She lived in thw habitual and cheerful exercise 

of those Christian graces and good works which, 

while they rendered her life an inestimable 

blessing to her family and friends, forbid them 

now to sorrow for her death, as though 

there was no hope in it. 

" Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord-, 

yea, saith the spirit, for they rest from their 

labours and their works do follow them." 

So she died, and thereby are those who 

loved her comforted. 



Sacred to the Memory of Anne Prances Breen, 

the beloved wife of William Chisholm Breen, 

who departed this life on the 28 th July 1833, 

aged 25 years, 3 months and 4 days. 



Anne Xiindsay, the infant dauprhter of 

The Hon'ble C. R. Lindsay, born 10th August 

1833, and died on the same day. 



Sacred to the Memory of Ziouisa Scott, 

the beloved wife of William Seton Charters, M. D. 

Surgeon H. C. Service, who departed this life 

23rd August 1833, aged 39 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of a beloved sister, 

Matilda Cox, 

Obit lOth June 1833, iEtat 24 yean. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr<t. Sophia Allcock, 

died 30th May 1833, aged 28 years, 

2 months and 1 day. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

James Rd. Barwell, K:iq. 

H. C. Civil Service, and sub -Treasurer of this 

PresidencY for 16 years. 

Died AprU l6th, 1833, aged 49. 






Sacred to the Mpmory of Mr. John Cook, 
who died on the 3rd June 1833, aged 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of George Chester, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 16th November 

1833, deeply lamented. Aged 52 yean. 



m 



SOrTlI PARK STUEET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacrt:<l to tht; M<inory •>( MrH. Slimabeth Hayer, 

the beloved wife of Mr. F. Ilayer, who deported 

thU life on the I3th February 1833, 

aged 18 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Fidel Hayer, 
died 7th November 1836, aged 45 years. 

To the Memory of Mrs. Ann Maniy. 

Wife of L. Manly, Esq. Merchant, died 2d 

March 1833, aged 59 years. 

This stone is laid by her affectionate daughter, 

Fanny Ewin. 

Also Charles IVellington Swin, 

Bom 3d of November 1832, died 25th 

September 1833, much lamented by his 

affectionate mother, F. Ewin. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Richard Mabert, 
died 2l8t May 1845, aged 42 years and 
11 months. 
O ye, whose cheek the tear of pity stains. 
Draw near with pious reverence and attend. 
Here lie the loving husband's dear remains. 
The tender father and the generous friend. 
This tribute of affection is raised by his 
wife and children. 

To the Memory of Mr. VfT. P. Mabert, 

who departed this life on the 3rd May 1833, 

aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomaji Moore Gale, Esq. 
who died on the 6th November 1833, 
aged 40 years, sincerely regretted. 

Jacob Iioois Otho ZKlthey, 

bom at Breslau 10th November 1804, died at 
Calcutta 26th April 1833. 



Sacretl to the Memory of Mr. Thomas IXThite, 
Branch Pilot, Pensioner in the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life on the 2d May 1833, 
aged 69 years. 
The sea of life I have weathered, 
My destined port I have found, 
Receive my soul, O Gracious Lord, 
Within ^y celestial bound. 
This tablet is erected by his affectionate 
wife, E. D. White. 



Sacred to the Memory of Falls Hartt, Esq. 

Assistant Surgeon, 41st Regiment N. I. died 

nth May 183G, aged 37 years. 

Also Master Q, T. IVaffbrd, 

died 24th November 1836, aged 1 year 
and 9 days. 



Sacredto the Memory of 

Major VTilliam Mitchell, 

of the Bengal Artillery, who departed this life 

on the 6th October 1817. 



Erected in Memory of .»«.•«»»«, 
the wife of George Richardson, Esq. of the Civil 

Service, and daughter of the late Roger 
Swctenham, Esq. of Somerford, in the county 
of Chester who departed this life the ISth July 
1817, aged 22 years. 



Sacnnl to the Memory of 

wife of Ebenezer Tliompson, who departed this 

transitory life almost without a warning, on 

the 4tli November 1817, at the early 

age of 20 yean, 

leaving 4 helpless children, a disccmsolBte father 

and a truly affectionate husband, to mourn her 

irreparable loss in the several relations of 
daughter, wife, mother and friend. Long will she 

remain remembered with fond affection. 

O best of wives, O dearer far to me than when 

thy virgin charms were yielded to my arms ; 

(But for your lovely pledges) 

How can my soul endure the losa of thee. 

Yes, my Anna, thy breast was the mansion uf 

goodness and you suspected no evil in others : 

your prudence of management was an honor 

to me, and I heard your praise with secret 

delight. Happy thy Eby who made thee his wife, 

Happy our dear babes who called thee Maminii. 

Oh may each passer bye, the lesson learn. 
Which can alone the bleeding heart sustain ; 
(Where friendship weeps at virtue's funeral urn,) 
That to the pure in heart to die is. gain. 

To commemorate her virtues this monument is 
erected by her severely afflicted husband, who 
alone is best able to judge of their influence 
and effects, and who is anxious to record this 
lasting testimony of the fdicity of their conjugal 
union during a period of six years and eight 
days, bcmg married 27th October 1811. Of the 
affection, love, gratitude, and r er e re n ce which 
be feels for her dear memory, and of the deep 
and indelible anguish whidi the premature 
loss of her has impressed upon, his perturbed 
mind. Also to the memory of lu|r infant 
son, who died October 28th, 1816^ 

Farewell ! yet broken pillars of my fate* 
My life's companion and my infimt son. 
Yet, while this silent stone I consecrate. 
To conjugal paternal love forlorn. 

" The Lord gave and the Lord haA tdcen away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.''— -Joh» i. 21. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. E. «»*,«««, 

wife of Lieut. J. F. Hyde, assistnit to the 

Surveyor General. The premature death of this 

most amiable, accompUshed and Tirtuous lady, 

holds out an awful example, how uncertain 

our tenure in this vale of tears. 
Died 17th November 1817, aged 23 years. 



Here lies the remains of Mr. _ 
who departed this life on tiie 16th day of March 
1818, aged 19 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of .^..^ ^ ^ ^ 

the wife of Alexander Bioss, of the Best India 

Company's Civil Service. She died on the 5th 

January 1818, aged 26 years and 9 months. 



Sacred to t he Memory of 
lieutenant UIHIliam OrawKordy 

of the Ist Battn. 16th Regt. N. I. who dcparte«^ 
this life on the 16th of April 1818, in the 25«A^ 
year of his age. 
This monument is erected by the officers of th*^ 
I corps, as a Listing testimony of their sincere 
I esteem and regard for his genuine worth. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



las 



Sacred to the Memory of Captain John IVales, 

of the U. C. Bombay Marine, and Marine 

Surveyor General of India, who died Jaauary 

15th, 1810, aged 44 years. 



Sacred to the Memory and virtues of 

PricilUt Forbes, 

the wife of James Forbes, of Calcutta, Gentleman, 

one of the Attornies of the Supreme Court of 

Judicature at Fort William in Bengal, who 

departed this life in the town of Calcutta March 

2l8t, 1808, in the 49tli year of her age. 



In Memory of a beloved child, Frances Sophia, 

daughter of Lane and Margaret Magniac. She 

died on the 4th June 1820, aged 7 months 

22 days. 



Sacred to the Memory uf Mr. John * . »««« , 
late pensioner m the llon'ble Company *s Marine, 
who died the 14th February 1810, aged 70 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Peter Galbrith, alias Patrick aalbrith, 
a native of Greenock in Scotland, pensioner on 
the H. C. Marine Establishment, who departed 
this life on the 9th May 1815, aged 70 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of IV. C. Jones, 
Boi^ Engineers, Obit 18th December 1818, 
iEt. 23 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. William Bdwin Davies, 

who died on the Ist of March 1819, in the 23d 

year of his age. 
** Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.'' 



Sacied to the fond Memory of a beloved child, 

Anna Paris Dick, 

daughter of George Stuart and Mary Dick, who 

died 18th May 1820, aged 1 year, 9 months 

and 28 days. 

'* Efen so Father for so it seemed good in 

thy sight.' 



t* 



Sacred to the Memory of 
afibctionate and dutiful daughter, 

Frastfses Ann Dick, 
who died on the 7th July 1819, 
aged 26 years, 9 months and 4 days. 
t 

Lieut. Frederick Anstice, 17th Regt. B. N. 1. 
Obit. 29th August 1819, aged 28 years. 



Sacre<l to the Memory of John Street, 

who departed this life Sept. 27th, 1819, 

aged 40 years. 



*« 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Frederick Thonkas Barfoot, 

son of Thomaa Barfoot, who departed this life 

October 9th, 1822, aged 11 years. 
*' I loTe them that love me and those that seek 
me early shall find me." 

Also of Blisabetk Barfoot, 
wife of Thomas Barfoot, who departed this life 

Jan. 24th, 1823, aged 50 years. 
Ood is a spirit and they that worship him must 
worship him in spirit and in truth." 



Sacred to the Muniory of Mrs Aaffosta Jones, 

who departed this life on the 31st of August 

1819, age<l 31 years. 

i'o the Memory of Q. VTllliams, Ksq. 
late chief officer of the H. C. Ship 
" Thomas Grenville," 
who died 10th Oct. 1819, aged 26 years. 

Mr. Andre^v Bowie 

Was a well known shipwright, and proprietor 
of Morton's patent slip at Gussery. lie was an 
entiTprizing and scientific individual, and believed 
to be the tirst who introduced Morton's useful in- 
vention. He was mild and amiable in liis man- 
ners, died after a residence of seventeen years in 
this country, esteemed and lamented by all who 
knew him. 

The following is the epitaph over him ;— 

Andire'vir Bovrie, Ksq. 
died 17th Sept. 1835, aged 45 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Jenning^s, 
who departed this life May the 3d, 1824, 
aged 38 years. 
" Tlie Lord gare and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be tlie name of the Lord.'' 

** Prepare to follow me." 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs Anne Boririe, 
wife of Mr. Andrew Bowie, head assistant to 

Messrs. Kyd and Co. Kidderpoi-e, 
who departed this life on the 5th Sept. 1826, 

aged 28 years. 
Eleven days after giving birth to a male child, 

who died 8 hours after his birth. 
** The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be tlie name of the Lord.'' 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Caroline Maria XaO^ 

wife of Captain Robert Ijow, of the ship ** Com- 
petitor," who departed this life on the 6th July 
1821, aged 24 years. 
After a few days illness which sho bore 
witli Christian patience and fortitude. Her amiable 
and virtuous disposition and good temper 
rendered her dear to her relatives and friends, 
and an irreparable loss to her affectionate 
and disconsolate husband. 
** The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away." 



Sacred to the Memory of Elijah Zmpey, 

Obit. June 10th, 1821. 

He was a pious Christian, zealous and skilful 

in his profession and ejccellent in every 

relation of private lite. In the same grave lies hi» 

beloved child Slvira Bliza Harriet, 

aged 3 years. Obit. August 14th, 1821. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Janet Bryce, 

widow of the late D. Bryce, Esq. of Jamaica, 

who departed this life May 30th, 1821, 

aged 62 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Francis ZHckson, Esq. 

a Captain in the 26th Bengal Infantry 

and Aide-de-Camp to the Marquis of Hastings, 

died on the 11th of May 1821, ^Etet 38. 

Deeply regretted by his numerous friends. 



134 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Duncan Forbes Robertson, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 27th June 1821. 

aged 21 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Qeor^e laindesay, 

of the Engineers on the Bengal Establishment, 
eldest son of George Lindesay, Esq. of 
Wormiston in Pifeshire, who after 12 years 
service, in which he acquired not only the appro- 
bation of his superiors, but the warm regard 
and esteem of many private friends, 
prematurely perished on the 10th of Oct. 1821, 
in the 31st year of his age. 
(In company with John Morrison, Esq, 
an Assistant Surgeon on this establishment,) 
by the upsetting of a Pinnace near Kedgeree. 
This memorial is erected by a few of those who 
most highly valued their departed friend as a 
slight tribute to his worth. 

Jonathan Beanland, 
died 25th Dec. 1821, aged II months. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
MisA Slisa D. Mathew, 

who departed this life on the 21st May 1823, 
aged 10 years. 

Slisabethy 

wife of Henry Thomas Celebrokc, Esq. 
Pious, benign and exemplary. Died Slst 
Oct. 1814, aged 29. 

Mr!*. Elixa Meg^e, 

died 8th July 1817, aged 19 years, 10 months 

and 12 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Mary Ann Rnsa, 

who departed this life on the 18th of June 1817, 

aged 28 years. 



Sacre to the Memory of Mrs. Mary ••<«••, 
who departed this life on the 22d of Sept. 1820, 

aged 25 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Rnss, 

late a Master in the H. C. Pilot service, Obit. 15th 

March 1823, aged 39 years. 

Erected by his afflicted widow. 



In Memory of Mary Ann Ross, 

died 6th December 1841, aged 28 years, 

7 months 14 days. 

Happy soul ! thy days are ended. 
All thy mourning days below ; 
Go, by angel guards attended. 
To the throne of Jesus, go ! 
Waiting to receive thy spirit 
Lo ! the Saviour stands above, 
Claims the purchase of His merit, 
Reaches forth the crown of love. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. M arga re t Bennett, 
died 25th November 1834, aged 38 years 

and 16 days. 

Tlis tablet of Memory is given by her son, 

G. W. Keymer* 



To the Memory of Mr. ^ 

late Master in the H. C. Marine, who departed 
thia life on the 4th of May 1817, 
aged 29 yean. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrft. Blisabeth BLoymer, 

wife of Mr. G. W. Keymer, died 6th April 1836, 

aged 20 years. 

Weep not for mc, lament no more, 
I am not dead, but gone before. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Marg^aret Stewart. 

who departed this life the 4th July 1831, 

aged 48 years, 7 months and 2 days. 

Forgive blest shade the tributary tear, 

That mourns thy exit from a world like tide ; 

Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here. 

And stay'd thy progress to seat of bliss. 

No more confin'd to grov'ling scenes of night. 

No more a tenant pent on mortal clay 

How should I rather hail thy glorious flight. 

And trace thy progress to the realms of Saj. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

the late Mr. Fraaoia Stewart, 

Branch Pilot in the H. C.'s Marine, 

who departed this life 29th October A. D. 1816, 

aged 43 years, 2 months and 25 days. 

O take these tears — mortality's relief, 
And till we share your joys forgive our gjief ; 
These little rites, a stone, a verse receive, 
'Tis all a consort, all a friend can give. 

Mrs. Mary Stawart, 

died 21st October 1812, aged 70 yean. 



In Memory of Mrs. 
relict of Mr. John Brown, died 24th April 1842, 

aged 76 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John 
who died the 4th March 1817, aged 49 years. 



Sacred to the Memoir of 
Lieutenant-Cieneral Kug'li StaArdf 
who departed this life 13th January 1819, 
aged 67 years. 



Matilda Maria Mc'VIThirtar If n nil, 

died 11th June 1822, aged 8 months and 19 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut -Colonel Arch. Oampbally 

of the Bengal Army, who died on the 19th 

March 1821, aged 57. 
To the active duties of a soldier in India, thirty- 
seven years of his life was devotsd ; dorkig this 
period various offices of responsibility wers en- 

trusted to him. In the discharge of which, 
the warmth of his heart, his mild and eqnal man- 
ners ; his disposition uniformly humane, 
considerate and kind, his sowid judgment, and 
spotless integrity secured the affection of his 
associates, the good will of the comrntmity, and 
commanded the esteem and confidenee of the 
state. It may with truth be said of this worthy 
man, that he never made a man hk fbe 
nor ever lost a 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



135 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut-Colonel Colin Mackensie, 

«f Engiaeers on the Madras Establi^ment, and 

Surveyor (General of India, who departed this 

life on the 8th May MDCCCXXI. 

iEt. S. LXVIII. 



Sacred to the Memory of two brothers, 

niomAs BoileaUy 

bom 29th Feb. and died i5th May 1820. 

And Bolomon, born 14tii March and died 

30th June 1824. 

Eire sin could blight or sorrow fade, 
Death came with friendly care, 
The op'ning buds to heaven convey 'd, 
And iMide them blossom there. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Frances Ann Bedell, 

the lovely and very beloved infant of William 

and Frances E. A. Bedell, bom 24th March 

1829, died 28th December 1830. 

" The Lord gave and the Lord bath taken away, 

blessed be the name of the Lord." 



'Sacred to the Memory of Alicia, 

he daughter S. H. Boileaii and Harriet, his wife, 

bom 8th February and died 17th March 1839. 

" Of such is the kingdom of heaven." 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Robert Martindell, 

who departed this life on the 1 9th February 

1835, aged 31 years. 

This stone is erected to his Memory by his 

affectionate wife. 



Sacred to the Memory of IVilliam, 

the lovelv infant son of William and Frances 

£. A. Bedell, born 26th October 1832, died 

28tb May 1833. 

" It is the Lord, let liim do what seemeth 

him good." 



Sacred to the Memory of Frances BedeU, 
the very beloved and third daughter of William 

and Frances £. A. Bedell, born 29th August 

1834, died 30th September 1842. She was a 
most affectionate and dutihil child. 
" To him that loved us and washed us from our 

sins in His own blood to him be the glory." 



i 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Robert Qabriel Martindell, 

amott lovely and beloved child, born 2 1st of 

July 1824, died 2d of September 1825. 

*' But Jesus called them unto him, and said, 

goffer little children to come unto me and forbid 

them not, for of such is the kingdom of God." 

nil atone is put up by his poor afflicted parents, 

Robert and Maria Martindell. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Sllinor Mary Martindell, 

a lovely and affectionate child, born 9th 
November 1813, died 18th February 1820. 
Sleep soft in dust, await the Almighty's will, 
Then riae ondiang'd and be an angel still. 

Sacred to the Memory ot Anna Gk*ace, 

the beloved daughter of Henry and Eliza 

Martindell, bom 9th March 1817, and died 

12th April 1828. 

Her father's and mother's pride, beloved she 
lived and lamented died, in the full assurance of 

everlasting bliss through the merits of Jesus 

Cbrkt, having in the agonies of death called out 

" she was hapjjy." 

" Of such is the kingdom of heaven." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Iionisa Richards Martindell, 

the beloved wife of H. Martindell, Esq. Attorney 

at Law, who departed this life on the 24 Ih 

November 1840, aged 20 years. 

deeply and sincerely regretted. This Tablet is 

erected by her disconsolate husband. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Henrj Oabriel Martindell, E<)q. 
Attorney at Law, who departed this life on the 

3rd October 1844, aged 33 years. 

** Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord." 

This tablet is erected by his brothers to his 

nradi respected Memory. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Cnptain Thomas Qeorg^ Street, 

of the ship *' Triumph," who departed this life 

on the 2nd December 1820, in the 41st year 

of his age, leaving an afflicted wife and children 

and many friends to regret hb loss. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr-s. Jane Ann Jones, 
the wife of Arthur Jones, Esq. who departed tins 
life 3rd October 1820, aged 20 years 
and 10 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of Thomas Dormer, Esq. 

Commander of the H. C. C. S. Coldstream, 

who departed this life the 10th of October 

1820, aged 50 years. 

In Memory of Patrick Icindesay, 

2nd officer of the H. C. S. " Sir David Scott," 

who died at Sanger on the 4th June 182i, 

aged 27 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Miss Mary Dick, 
who died 8th April 1820, aged 56 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Henry Chalcroft, Junr. 
who died 23rd December 1830, aged 21 years, 
11 months and 24 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. AnnMaberty 
who died 14 th of October 1826, leaving a 
husband and 2 infants to lament her loss. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Richard Morton Paye, Esq. 
died 13th February 1827, aged 38 years. 



To the Memory of 
Edward Oomwallis TITilmot, 

of the Bengal Civil Service, who died at Calcutta 

23rd December 1826, aged 19 years and 

3 months. 

This monument is erected by his fellow-students 

and friends. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Blisabeth Webster, 

wife of Mr. John Webster, who departed this life 

on the 9th April 1827, aged 18 years. 



136 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Major Harrie Ificl&elsoa, 

of the 15th Regiment N. 1. late Pa3^a8tcr 
to the Bengal Division of Troops serving nnder 
Major General Sir A. Campbell, K. C. B. in Ava, 
who departed this life on the 20th of Dec. 1826, 
aged 40 years, 9 months and 13 days. 
By the death of Major Nichelson, 
the Army has lost a brave and zealous officer, 
and many of its members, a generous- 
hearted friend ; whilst among his own immediate 
relatives his loss is most sincerely 
and deeply felt. 

To the Memory of P. J. Miller, 
son of Lieut. G. Miller, 25th Regt. N. L 
Obit. 10th February 1832, 
i£t. 1 year, 11 mouths, 26 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Jane ZZarriet Rice, 

daughter of the late Richard Blechynden, Esq. 

of Calcutta. She departed this life on the 4th of 

Jany. 1827. at the early age of 20years & 12 days. 

Her career on earth was finished ; as a wife, 
sister and friend, she was most exemplary and has 
left the memorial of her virtues deeply engraven 

ill the hearts of those who have known and 

loved her from her infancy, who must ever mourn 

her early and sudden removal. 

Her infont daughter lies beside her. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Charlotte VITelcliinan, 

relict of C. \V. Welchman, Esq. of the Bengal 

Medical Service, died 18th August 1832, 

aged 39 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Alexander IVardrop, Esq. 

Surgeon H. C. Service, died 6th July 1832, 

aged 37 years. 



In Memory of Charles Cashmere, 

late of Birmingham, Assistant New Mint, 

died 25th June 1832, aged 32 years. 



Robert Henrj Stuart, Esq. 

Honorable C. C. Service, eldest son of 

Major General the Honorable Patrick Stuart, 

departed this life 22d August 1832, aged 21 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Bmily Qeorgiana IVetenhall, 
wife of Wm. Marsden Wetenhall, Esq. 

Captain of H. M. 10th Regt. 

who died at Calcutta 2nd October 1842, 

aged 33 years. 



To the Memory of 
Miss Bmily Elizabeth Dickie, 

aged 19 years, 8 mouths 22 days, 
died 10th June 1832. 

Also to the Memory of Thomas Harton, Esq. 
who died 23d October 1833, aged 56 years. 



Thomas Dougfal, 

bom at Montrose, N. B. 23d August 1807, 
died 11th AprU 1832, in his 25lh year. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Harriet Dagat, 

wlio died 19th October 1832, 

aged 27 years, 9 months, 10 days. 

Also ill Memory of P ie i Te Itoois Dof^at, 

who died 25th Sept. 1837, aged 42 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of James Fraser, Vm\. 
bom at Kelso, in the ooimty of Roxburgh, N. B. 

for many years Indigo Planter and Superin- 
tendent of embankments in the district of Jessore, 
residing at Damoodiah. Obit, at Calcutta 
16th AprU 1832, Mt. 83 years. 
This Monument is erected by his children as a 
token of their affection. 



Sacred to the Memory of Margaret Hof^^an, 

who after a life of unpretending piety and virtue 

calmly ft^ asleep, relying securely on the 

merits of her Redeemer, 13th August 1832, 

aged 41 years. 

** Blessed are the pure in heart for they 

shall see God.'' 



Lieut. Robert SScFarlaae Oampb«]l,23d N'. I. 
bom 23d May 1805, died 8th April 1832, aged 27. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Aui^osta Jones, 
who departed this life on the Slst of Aug. 1819. 

aged 31 yean. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Streynsham Iierh Master, Esq. 

who departed this life July 17th, 1832, 

aged 27 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Anna Robertson, 
relict of the late Mr. R. Robertson, who departed 
this life 10th Not. 1830, aged 57 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of! 
the wife of John Henry Barlow, Bsq. Bengal 
Civil Senrice, Obit. 4 th September 
1830, aged 35 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. •«««• «*«^w««y 
the good, the affectionate and charitable wife of 

R. W. Bmce, Esq. eldest daughter of the 

late Major Adam Brown of the Madras Army, 

by his second marriage, died 27tfa October 

1830, aged 28 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Marf^aret Templetott. 

eldest daughter of Colonel William Hopper, 

of the Bengal Artillery, and wife of Mr. John 

Templeton, who departed this life on the 

lith August 1830, aged 28 years, 

and 10 months. 

** The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away 

blessed be the name of the Lord.'' 

This Monument is erected by her afflicted hus- 
band, who is left with a young family to 
deplore her irreparable Imi. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mujor-Geiieral VTilliaA noipper, 

of the Bengal Artillery, who after having served 

the Honorable Company for a period of sixty 

years, departed this life on the 6th of July 1843, 

aged 77 years, 11 months. 

lie was respected through life by all who knew 

him^ and died sincerely lameoted. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



J3r 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Andrew Anderson, Esq. 

of the Civil Service, who died the 1st of 

Sept. 1818, aged 26 years. 

Forgive blest shade the tributary tear 
That mourns thy exit from a world like this ; 
Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here 
And stay'd thy progress to the seat of bliss. 
No more coufin'd to grov'ling scenes of night ; 
No more a tenant pent in mortal clay, 
Now should I rather hail thy glorious flight, 
And trace thy progress to the realms of day. 

Sacred to the Memory of Sarah, 
wife of Major J. L. Stuart, Aid-de-Camp to the 

Governor General, and daughter of the late 

R. Morris, M. P. for Gloster, who departed this 

life 16th September 1818, aged 24. 

To record the lamented loss of her whose 

domestic virtues and afl'ectionatc heart 

endeared her to her family 

and friends, 

TtiB stone is inscribed by her disconsolate 

husband. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Deut.- Colonel J. I«. Stuart, 
who departed this life 3d Sept. 1827, aged 44. 
Inscribed by an affectionate and grateful friend. 



Here lies the body of my friend 

Colonel George Flenun^, J. A. S. 

He died on the 3d July 1818, at the age of 57. 

To the Memory of 

Ensign IVm. Heinrett, 

died 2l8t Oct. 1818, aged 17 years. 



Here lyeth the body of Ann ZZnring^on, 

wife of Wm. Harington, Esq. of the 11. C. 
Civil Service, Madras. Obit. 4th January 1819, 

^t. 52. 

*' I have fought a good fight, I have finished 
my coarse. I have kept the faith, heneforth is 
laid up for me a crown of righteousness." 

'* Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord 
that they may rest from their labours, and their 
works do follow them." 

** The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



Sacred to the Memory of James Zrvirin, Esq. 

of the H. C. Civil Service, who died 5th 

Dec. 1818, aged 40 years. 

He ma in life distinguished for the benevolent 

warmth of his disposition ; as a public servant 

his career was strongly marked by unabating zeal 

and the firmest integrity. In his domestic 

relations as a son, a husband and a 

fotiier, he was truly exemplary, and as a friend 

ardent and sincere. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mary Fendall, 
Uie wife of John Fendall, Esq. who departed this 
life on the 8th September 1818. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Harriet Anf^oata Trotter, 
the beloved wife of T. C. Trotter, B. C. S. 
who died at Calcutta on the 30th of July 1838, 
aged 21 years, 1 month and 24 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Zianra Maria Trotter, 

wife of Archibald Trotter, B. C. S. who died at 

Calcutta on the 21st Nov. 1818, aged 26 years 

and 6 months. 

This Monument is erected by her hiLsband, as a 

record of his devoted attachment, and a token 

of affectionate remembrance of that exemplary 

worth which endeared her to her friends and 

acquired her the esteem and regard of the society 

in which she lived. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. James Bamett, 
of the 16th Regt. B. N. I. who departed this life 
the nth day of April, A. D. 1819, 
aged 26 years. 
" Into thine hand I commit my spirit ; Thju 
hast redeemed me, O Lord God of truth." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Eliaa Bathgate, 
who departed this life on the 12th of March 1819, 
aged 19 years and 3 days. 



Here lyeth the Mortal remains of 
Ohaa. Nicolson, Esq. 
Merchant and Indigo Planter, who departed this 

life in a sure and certain hope of a joyful 

resurrection, on the 9th May, A. D. 1819, aged 

75 years, who feared God but not death, and 

maintained independence, but sought not riches ; 

who thought none below him but the base and 

unjust ; none above him but the wise and virtuous 

who loved his family, frieiul.H and kindred, the 

poor and needy, with an ardour which was the 

chief source of all his pleasures and his pains. 

The righteous souls that take their flijjlit, 
Far from this world of pain, 
In God's paternal bosom blest. 
For ever shall remain. 



This tomb covers the remains of 
Alexander Oolvin, 
whose life was passed in the exercise of all the 
charities which flow from Christian principle 
and from the purest benevolence of heart. 
His affectionate and amiable temper gained him 
the love of society, and rendered hhn inexpressi- 
bly dear to his wife, his children, and his family. 

As an eminent merchant of this city during a 
period of forty years his candour, integrity and 
conciliatory disposition secured to him the 
respect and attachment of the Mercantile 
community, who erect tliis monument in 
Memory of his virtues and in testimony of their 
affectionate esteem. Born A. D. 1756. 
Died A. D. 1818. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomaa Montg^omerie, 

of the Bengal Artillery, Aid-de-camp to the 
Governor General, who died the 18th day of 

April A. D. 1819, aged 22 years. 

He was highly respectetd in his professional, 

and much loved in his private character. 



To the Memory of 81. Blackburn, Esq. 
Obit 24th May 1819, aged 59. 
In life he hoped for salvation in Jesus Christ ; in 
death he rests in peace until the fulness of time. 



138 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Knsifcn R. E. Blackburn, 

dieil 11th Juno 1825, aged 19 year». 

Blessed Lord receive his soul. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Maria Blackburn, 

Relict of the late Samuel Blackburn, 

aged 62 years, 10 months 23 days. 

Obit 17th May 1840. 

*' I am become like a broken vessel, take me, 

for whom have I in heaven but thee ; my hope hath 

been in thee ; thou art my God.'* 

Sacred to the Memory of Captain James Randle, 

of the country service, who departed this life 

on the 10th February 1841, aged 42 

years, 1 1 months and 4 days. 

Also his infant daughter, 

Emily Jane Dunlop Handle, 

who died 17th January 1842, aged 2 years, 

4 months and 7 days. 

Re^it be unto their souls. 



Affection's tribute by four young Orphans to 

the memory of a dear departed mother. 

And is Sacred to 

Mrs. Isabella Maria Handle. 

Relict of the late Captain James Randle, died 

30th November 1846, aged 37 years 11 months. 

** The Lord in mercy tempereth the wind 

to the shorn lamb.^' 



Sacred to the Memory of Master lUTm. P.Taylor, 
who departed this life on the 8th of August 
1821, aged 1 year, 5 months and 27 days. 

Catherine Herbert. 



To the Memory of Edward Pond, 
of the H. C. CivU Service, died on the 12th 
December 1819, aged 33 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Elisa Forsyth, 

daughter of Isaac Forsyth of Elgin, Scotland, 

who died at Calcutta 30th June 1821, aged 19. 

On distant shores from kindred dust remov'd, 

Here rest the relics of a maid belov'd, 

Who grace to virtue, taste to knowledge join'd, 

And sense and temper happily combined. 

With warm affections and devoutly pure, 

Her faith was steadfast and her hope secure, 

Secure her bliss, where her best thoughts were 

given, 
She fled from earth and gained her Saviour's 

heaven. 



Sacred to the Memory of l^lliam Ritchie,Esq. 
Merchant, who died at Calcutta, 5th June 1819, 

aged 23 years. 

This Monument is erected by his attached friends 

and partners Donald Macintyre and John 

Anderson. 



Mis.4 Mary Hewett, 

who departed this life 7th July 1821, aged 7 dys. 

To the Memory of Charlotte TVhittle, 

and her infant daughter, wife of Lieut. H. Whittle, 

R. N. who deported this life August 1st, 1820. 



Sacred to the Memonr of 
Major Peter laewis Otrant, 

r2tli Regiment Bengal N. Infantry, acting Town 

Major of Fort WiUkm, who died 12th of 

June 1819, in the 39th year of his age. 

The merits of Mi^or Grant at an officer, are 

inscribed in the records of the state, and 

his gallant conduct daring the memorable siege of 

fihurtpore obtained for him the warmest 
approbation of Lord Lake, Commander-in-chief 

of the army in India ; by his brother oflicerii, 
he was esteemed, by the soldiers, inspected and 

beloved ; in private life, his cheerful temper 

and amiable qualities gained him many friends 

who sincerely deplored his loss. And to the 

memory of Anne his wife, daughter of George 

Powney, Esq. ofGrosvenor Square, who departed 

thiii life the 2nd of Sept. 1819, ^ged 26 years, 

deeplyregrctted by her family and nnmerous 

friends. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Boknd Bfielaen mTolff, 

who departed this life the 18th August 1819, 
aged 33 years, and much regretted. 
It id appointed unto all men once to die." 



II 



Underneath are dmosited the remtine of 
Samuel Mnnckley DnatB«, Esq. 

late assistant superintendent of Pblioe 
in the Lower Provinces, who departed this life 

19th August 1819, aged 25 yean. 

Deeply and generally regretted ; his orhanity of 

manners, and benevolence of heart made him 

admired and beloved by all classes, and the 

pride of every circle. This humble inscription to 

the memory of departed worth and csoellence is 

offered by an old friend and school-fellow 

who had intimately known him upwards 

of seventeen years, and owed him 

many, very many obligatiotts. 

Mr. "^Villiam Qraham, 
bom Feb. 1775, died Dec. 1819. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

a Lieut, in die H. C. 2d Bat. 25th Regt. B. N. I. 

and a Sub-Assistant Commiaaary Genend« 

who departed this life 23d of AagQat 

1819, aged 34 yean. 

To mark their respect for his prineiplet end 

intelligent zeal in the public service, and their 

esteem for his virtues which endeared him to a 

large circle of friends, the officers of his 

corps have caused this Monument 

to be erected over his remains. 



Here lieth the remains of 
LieuU Thomas Dini^wall Fordycc, 

of the Bengal ArtiUery, 
who departed this life 7th of January 1820, 

aged 28 years and 9 months. 
*' I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that be 
shall stand at the last day upon the earth, and 
though after my skin, worms destroy this body, 
yet in my flesh shall I see Gkxi." 

This Memorial is erected by a disconsolate 
widow, who laments the early death of an 
affectionate husband and a faithful friend. 



Sacred to the Memory of John Alsagvry Esq. 

who departed this life on the 

5th of September 1819, aged 27 yetn. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



139 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Matilda Adolphus Xiidding^n, 

amiable and highly accomplished youn^ lady, 
who departed this life 10th of Jan. 1820, 
aged 19 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Eosign James Donnithome 

who departed this life on the 17 th day of 
September 1819, aged 19 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain IXTUliain Peacock Fulcher, 
Obit. 22d day of July 1820, JEt. 32 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Ohristiana Anne, 

wife of John Alexander Pringle, 
who departed this life on the 12th day of Nov. 
1830, aged 26 years. 
** He said, weep not, she is not dead but sleepetli. 



Oliarlotte Christina Helen, the daughter of 

David and Frances Pringle, died 20th AprU 1834, 

aged 2 years and 6 months. 

" Jesus called them unto him and said, suffer 

little children to come unto me and forbid them 

not, for of soch is the kingdom of God.'' 



To the Memory of Major &. Ziawrence, 

Assistant Secretaj-y to Government, Military 

Department, Obit. 12th November 1830, JEt. 44. 



To the Memory of Miss Marg^aret Brae, 
bom lOtb August 1788, died 23d Nov. 1830. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrmiam IVhite, Esq. 
eldest son of the late James White, Esq. 
Merchant in Glasgow, who departed 
this life 21st Oct. 1831, aged 36. 

Also to the Memory of Lieut. James VThite, 
49th Regt. Bengal Native Infantry, 
second son of the late James White, Esq. 
who died at Arracan 24th August 1825, aged 25. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Henrj Ohalcraft, 
who died 22d October 1831, aged 43 years. 

To the Memory of Donald Macleod, Esq. 
died 6th Nov. 1831, aged 32 years. 

Also of his SOD Alexander, 
died 20th Nov. 1831, aged 1 year 2 months. 

Frances Mary, daughter of 

H. H. and Prances Wilson, bom 20th October 

1830, died 25th November 1831. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Adam Nicholson, Esq. 

late Branch Pilot H. C. Marine, 

died 18th August 1832, aged 58 years. 

To the Memory of Charles Clark Roberts, 
bom 20th Dec 1825, died 31st Jan. 1833. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Jacob Frederick Plusker, »q 
of Chin»arah,bom 11th Nov. 1796, died 22rl 
Oct. 1832, Mt, 45 years, 11 months, 11 dnys. 

T 2 



Soli Deo Honor sit ct gloria in secula 

seculorum. Amen. 

Beneath this tablet lie entombed the venerable 

remains of 
Mrs. Slixa Margt. Harding;, 
who departed tliis life on the 9th Oct. 1832, 
in the 78th year of her age. 

As those we love decay, we die in part, 
String after string is sever'd from the heart, 
Till loosen'd life at last but breathing clay 
Without one pang is glad to fall away. 
Yet friends when dead, arc but removed from 

sight, 
Sunk in tlie lustre of eternal light. 
And when the parting storms of life arc o'er 
May still rejoin us on a happier shore. 



In Memory of 

Charles Fleming Hunter, Esq. 

Member of the Mercantile Firm of Gilmore i*<f Co. 

of this city, who died at Calcutta 5th 

Oct. 1832, aged 17 years. 

To the Memory of 

Edwrard Marjoribanks, Esq. 

of the Civil Service, eldest son of Sir John 

Marjoribanks, Bart, of Lees, bom 1 Uh 

Jan. 1792, died 1st Jan. 1833. 



" The righteous die under God's covenant of 
everlasting life." 
Sacred to the Memory of Sophia Amelia, 

the beloved wife of J. H. Patton, C. S. who de- 
parted thiii life on the 26tli November 1832. 
Aged 29 years. 

Sainted spirit lleaven-ward rise, 
Soar the native of tlie skies. 
Pearl of price, by Jesus bought. 
To his glorious likeness w roiight ; 
Go to shine before his throne, 
Deck his mediatorial crown, 
Go His triumphs to adorn, 
Born of God, to God return. 
Lo he beckons from on high, 
Fearless to his presence fly. 
Thine the merit of his blood, 
Thine the righteousness of God. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Major Zrving; Maling^, 
Presidency Paymaster, Fort William. Obit. 17th 
November 1831, iEtat 50 years. 

Here lie the remains of 
Charles Hunter, Esq. 
Member of the Medical Board, who departed tliis 

life the 7th May 1831, aged 58 years. 
The most khid and afTectionate brother, the sin- 
cere friend and the truly worthy man. 

Sacred to the Memory of Jane, 

eldest daughter of Peter Andrew, Esq. 

who departed this life January 18th 1838, 

aged 42 years, 6 months 29 days. 

Tliis Monument is raised in grateful remembrance 

by an affectionate brother, who long will lament 

the vanished ray that scnttered gladness 

over his path. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

David itndre^v, E*q. 

who departed this life 25th November 1837, 

aged 69 years, 2 montht and 20 days. 



140 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of IJITillUiii, 

3rd son of David Andrew, Esq. born Ist August 

1840, died Ist August 1841. 

Sacred to the Memory of Francis Harris, 

4th son of David Andrew, Esq. who departed this 

life on the 22d Nov. 1844, aged 2 years, 

4 months and 22 days. 

This tablet is raised by Helen Harris, to the 

Sacred Memory of her husband, 

Francis Harris, Esq. 

of Khal Boalya, Kisheiiaghur, who departed this 

life at Bombay, to which place he went for 

the beneftt of his health, on the 6:h day 
of September 1843, aged 42 years, 5 months 

and 18 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Peter Andre'wr, Ksq. 

who departed this life 27th August 1839, 

aged 68 years, 11 months and 15 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of David, 

eldest son of David Andrew, Esq. who departed 

tliis life on the 26th July 1842, aged 12 years, 

2 months and 6 days. 

This tablet is raised to the Memory of Jane, 

daughter of David Andrew, Esq. who departed 

this life nth day of April 1831, at Mnlnaut, 

aged 1 year, 3 months and 12 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Jane Isabella, 
eldest daughter of Helen and Francis Harris, Esq. 
who departed tliis life May 14th, 1831, 
aged 3 years, 4 months, 8 days. 
'* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.'' 



Sacred to the Memory of Jolm Siidth, Esq. 
of Drongan, in the county of Ayr, Senior member 
of the firm of Fcrgusson & Co. of this city, who 
died of cholera on the 3rd December 1830, aged 
44 years and 5 months. 
As a friend, warm and sincere ; as a merchant, 
honourable and upright ; in every relation of life, 
kind, liberal and generous, his loss will long 
be regretted by all who knew him. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Cudbert Thomhill Qlass, Esq. 

of the Hon'ble Company's Civil Service on their 

Bengal establishment, and eldest son of Lieut. 

Col. Glass of St. Andrews, Fifeahire, North 

Britain, and formerly of the Bengal Artillery, who 

departed this life 14th December 1830, 

aged 37 years. 

Francis Howard IXTliite, 

Obit 26th November 1830, iEUt 21. 



Sacred to the Memory of David Sd'vrard, 

second son of Helen and Francis Harris, Esq. 

who departed this life March 4th 1840, 

aged 2 years, 3 mouths and 22 days. 

Sacred to tlie Memory of Mary, 
only daughter of the late Joseph Bird, Esq. 
of the Dooria Factory, Tirhoot, who de])arted 
this life 2l8t March 1844, aged 21 years. 

In Memory of IXniliam, infant son of 
W. F. and Marian Fergusson, who died on the 
23d June 1834, aged 9 months and 23 days. 
His parents have placed this stone. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Colonel Thomas Robertson, 

of the corps of Engineers, who departed this life 
on the 8th of June 1831. He entered the service 

in the year 1781, and was engaged in most of 
Lord Lake's Campaigns, and died, having comple- 
ted a period of service of 50 years of 
unblemished reputation and acknowledged zeal 
and integrity ; esteemed and respected for his 
talents, and beloved for his private worth and 
benevolent dispositions. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Charles Pattenson, Esq. 

H. C. Civil Service, who departed this life on the 

1st Jan. 1831, aged 54 years 6 months. 

His last hours were soothed by a cheerful hope 

and unwavering trust in the mercy of God 

and Christ. 



Solomonis Hamilton, 

Armigeri Advocati Hoc Monumento memoriam 

Coluit Liberorum Amor Natus in Hibemia. 

September MDCCLIII. Obut eheu Calcutta, Mul- 

tis amatas dinque deflendus Mort MDCCCXX. 

To the Memory of the Rev. J. P. Nof^ent, 

who died the 29th September 1819, 
aged 45 yean. 



Here lieth the body of 
Mrs. Catherine BUsabath Swinhoe, 

wife of John Henry Swinhoe, Esq. and daughter 

of Robert Penny, Esq. of Weymouth, 

Dorsetshire, who departed this life 28th June 

1820, aged 25 years and 10 months. 

To a mind highly cultivated and to those 

ornamental accomplishments valuable to society, 

the deceased in an eminent d^;Tee added 
unaffected piety. Though formed 1>y education and 

sweetness of disposition to adorn and add zest 
to the more brilliant and higher circles of life, she 
fully proved herself the amiable and dutiful 
daughter the dear and affectionate wile, the 
most truly attentive and tender mother, and the 
ever kind sister. This pillar is erected by her grate- 
ful husband, who, as he appreciated her worth 
while living, will ever cherish the most sincere re- 
gard for her memory, and who looks forward 
with fond and humble hope tiirough tiie mercy of 
Providence to a joyful reunion in that world 
where sorrow is not known. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

John Henry Swinhoe, Esq. 

late officiating solicitor to the H. £. I. Company 

at Calcutta, born on the 3rd February 1794, 

died on the 13th October 1837. 

He was a generous and an honest man, and has 

left many who well knew his worth to deplore his 

early death. This pillar is erected by his 

afflicted brother, T. £. Swinhoe. 



Sacred to the Memory Alice Oookey 
Daughter of Captain Jno. and Elizabeth Marie 
Cooke, of Calcutta. 
This amiable and truly affectionate young woman 

was torn from her afflicted parents and family 

at the early age of 17 years, 6 months and 2 day«, 

on the 2Ut of October 1819. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



141 



To the Memory of 

an affectionate wife, mother of 15 children, 

Mrs. Slisabeth Marie Cookey 

who after a paiiifiil illness of 4 months which, she 

bore with exemplary patience and fortitude, 

departed this life on the 25th October 1827, 

aged 52 years, 5 months, 15 days, 

leaviiig a husband and ten children to bewail her 

irreparabie loss. Also of Joseph, her eldest son, 

who left the Calcutta Pilot, March 1820, in 
command of " Fatalmaine,'' bound to Bussorah, 

and was never after heard of. 
Also of Slisabeth, her eldest daughter and infant, 

periahed with her husband Captain Auldjo, 

Comnumding the Bombay ship ** Alexander," in 

the English channel. Also of Henry, her second 

son, who died at School when in England for his 

education. Also of John, her third son, who 

died in infancy. 

A Iso to the Memory of Captain John Cooke, 

Bom in the county of Sufiblk, 4th November 

1764, and died at Calcutta, by a sudden attack of 

cholera, on the 13th May 1828, aged G3 years, 

6 months 9 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Harriet Adelaide, 
second daughter of Captain William and Harriet 
Clarke, died 13th January 1829, aged 10 
months and 20 days. 

Happy infant ! early blest ! 
Rest in peaceful slumber, rest, 
£larly rescued from the cares, 
'^liich increase with growing years. 

The infant daughter of D. McF. and M. A. 

McF. aged 2 montlis and 18 days, 

died 18th March 1832. 

On the 2nd Nov. 1838, were interred twins, 

a boy and girl boni prematurely. 

On the Ist Dec. 1843, was interred Robert, 
their infant brother, aged 1 month and 10 days. 



Here rest the mortal remains of 
Marianne Matilda Iiindstedt, 
the beloved wife of Chas. Wm. Lindstedt, 
who departed this life on the 15th June A. D. 

1820, aged 21 years and 10 months. 

In gratitude to whose memory and in testimony 

of his conjugal love and esteem, 

this monument is erected by her faithful 

and disconsolate husband. Farewell ! my loved 

Marianne, though this mouldering tomb may for a 

idiile preserve the memory of thy name, 

yet the recollection of thy virtues will ever live 

in the hearts of thy fond husband and friends. 



To the Memory of 
Ohmrlas IVilliam Iiindstedt, 

eldest son of Lieutenant William Lindstedt, 

H. C. European Regiment, 

and Deputy Register, Military Department. 

Bom 18th May 1788, Died llth August 1844, 

iEtat 56 years, 3 months and 1 day. 

" Thy wUl be done." 



In Memory of 
Marianne Rose Iiindstedt, 

second daughter of the late C. W. Lindstedt, 

who died 12th August 1845. 

aged 20 years, 1 month and 2 days. 

Humble, unaffected and pious in person, 



comely, and for virtue loved, she blossomed here to 

bright maturity, then by her pleai»ed and 

pitying Redeemer was snatched tiirough brief 

mortal suffering to bloom for ever in the 

mansions of the blest. 

Father, thy gracious hand wc own. 
And bow submissive to thy rod ; 
That must be wise which Thou hast done, 
It must be kind, for " Thou art God." 



In Memory of Robert Ghregory Morris, Esq. 

of the Bombay Civil Service, 

who died in Fort William, 19th October 1819, 

in the 27th year of his age. 

To record his virtues and their loss, 

this monument is erected by those to whom he 

was in life a tender and most affectionate brother. 

Alas ! my brother. 

J. C. M., G. J. M., and W. R. M. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Frances Alice IJirillian&s, 

sixth daughter of Mrs. M. Williams, who died 
25th Jan. 1833, aged 25 years and 3 months. 



Sacred to the Memo ry of 
Miss Iiouisa Elisabeth IJIfilliams, 

who departed this life on the 4th January 1820, 

aged IG years and 27 days. 

This monument is erected by a fond 

and bereaved mother to whom and to her six 

affectionate sisters, as well as to a large circle of 

relations and friends, 

This departed child had endeared herself by the 

urbanity of her manners and amiable disposition. 

*' Let them not grieve as those withimt hope." 

*' The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 

blessed be the name of the Lord." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret VTilliams, 

widow of the late Mr. Robt. Williams, 

who departed this life on the 29th October 1829, 

aged 57 years, 10 months and 13 days. 

This monument is erected 

by five surviving daughters, as a small tribute 

of affection to a fond and kind parent. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Jane Caroline Hudson, 

the beloved wife of Captain John Hudson, 

who departed this life on the 3rd October 1829» 

aged 27 years, 7 months and 14 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Nathaniel John Hudson, 

the eldest and beloved son of 

Nathaniel and Margaret Hudson, 

who departed this life on ike 30th Sept. 1842, 

aged 24 years and 1 1 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Nathaniel Hudson, 

who departed this life on the 5th July 1846, 
aged 51 years and 10 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Qeorg^e Sdward Hudson, Esq. 

who departed this life at Calcutta on the 23rd 

April 1839, aged 36 years, 9 months and 12 days, 

sincerely and deeply regretted. 



142 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
John Bannister Hudjion, Esq. 
who departed this life 13th October 1819, 
in the 55th year of his age. 

Robert Rayner Yonng^, 

a Captain in the 27th Regt. of Native Infantry, 

on the E. I. Company's Bengal Establishment, 

Sub-Assistant Commissary General of the Staff, 

and Officiating Deputy Secretary to the Supreme 

Government in the Military Department. 

He died at Calcutta on the 14th July 1819. 

In the 30th year of his age. 

How much beloved and how much regretted 

all those can tell who knew him 

in public and in private life. 

His sorrowing widow and brothers have erected 

this memorial of past happiness. 

Sophia, John, James, and William. 

To the Memory of 
Arthur Jacob Macan, 

who departed this life on the 19th Sept. 1819, 

aged 45 years. 
With a pure and st^fast faith in the tenets of the 

Gospel, he endeavoured in every situation 

to make his actions accord with its divine precepts, 

and devoted his time, his talents and his 

fortune to relieve the distressed, 

and to encourage virtue and piety, of which he was 

a bright but unostentatious example. 

Sacred to the Memory of Richard Chase, Esq. 

of the H. C. Civil Service, 

who departed this life 24th November 1819, 

aged 24 years. 

A tribute of friendship, 

this Monument is erected to the Memory of 

Henry Taylor, Khiq. of the H. C. Civil Service, 

who expired on the 23d day of June 1820, 

at the early age of 24 years, 

most deeply and sincerely lamented. 

To the Memory of Jan&es Steuart. Esq. 

seventh son of David Steuart, Esq. of Edinburgh, 

and late a Lieut, of H. M. S. " Hebrus." 

He died 11th April 1820, 

at the early age of 25 years. 

John Robert, and Thomas David Steuart 

have caused this memorial of a beloved brother 

to be erected. 



Sacred to the Memory of Thomas Roebuck, 

Captain in the Madras N. Infantry, 
and Examiner in the Hindostanee, Bruj Bhosha, 
Persian and Arabic Languages, 
in the College of Fort William. 
Bom December 1784, deceased December 1819. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Benjamin Barons, 

Bom at Chcshunt in Hertfordshire, 27th July 

1764, Obit. 5th March 1820, 

after a residence of 36 years in India. 

He hoped for salyation through Christ Jesus. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret Barons, 
died 26th June 1832, aged 57 years. 



In (he Memory of Mi»; Harriet Barons, 

Obit. 12th December 1841, MtaX 48 years. 

Loveil in life and lamented in death. 



To the Memory of Hngh Inrlis Ker, 

a Captain in tlie 7th Regt. B. N. Cavalry, 

who (tied at Bourdah in Baitool, on the 20th 

Dec. 1818, in his SOtii year. 

Distinguished for gallantry in tbe field, 

beloved and honored in aU the 

relations of private life. 

This tablet on his brother's tomb Is ooniecrated. 



Erected in Memory of Robert Ker, 

one of the Civil Servants of the East India 

Company on the Bengal Establishment, 

who died on the 3d Dec. 1819, aged 45 years. 

During a service of 22 years Mr. Ker 
passed through various situations of trust and 
difficulty, in all evincing an admirable strictness of 
principle, soundness of judgment and force 
of character. Able, laborious and 
independent, anxious only for the public interests ; 
expecting reputation and favor solely through 
the discharge of public duty, 
gaining both unsolicited. In 1814 Mr. Ker 
was selected to fill a seat in the Supreme 
Native Court at this Presidency ; the unanimous 
choice of his fellows directed the choice. 
His excellent administration honored it. 
In 1818 unhappy disturbances agitating Cuttack, 
Mr. Ker was called to the Civil adminvtration of 
the province, in which while yet a 
youth, he had by a just and wise government 

eminently rdsed the British name and 
powerfully attached the affections of a newly 
conquered people, for the public good, 
readily sacrificing his personal comforts. 
He freely exposed himself, labouring under disease, 

in an unhcaltliy climate, and Ml a Tictim 
to public duty, having, to the province eommitted 
to his charge, restored peace, security and order. 

The virtues of Mr. Ker in private life were 
not less distinguished than his merits as a public 

man, and bore the same stamp of unaffected 
truth and unpretending sincerity. Kind, geoeroes, 
humane and warm-hearted, 

Never was one more dearly loved ; 
Never more deeply lamented. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Msavfield, 
died on the 11th June 1821, aged 30 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John ..««»«•, 

who departed this life on tiie 8th of Dec. 1821, 

aged 47 yean. 

God my Redeemer lives. 

And often from the skies 

Looks down and watches all my dust. 

Till he shall bid it rise. 

Tliis tomb is erected as a token of affection by his 
disconsolate widow, Margaret Barnes. 



1 o the Memory of Mrs. Slisa Anns Iiowrrie, 
who died 25th July 1820, aged 22 years, 
3 months and 25 days. 



To the Memory of Miss Franees Morrell, 

who departed this life 2d October 1819, 

aged 20 years. 



IJITilliam Irwin, 

infant son of Paul Marriot Wynch, Esq. B. C. S. 

bom 2lst Feb. 1828, died 5th June 1828, 

aged 3 months 15 days. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



143 



Sacred to the Memory of Capt. Haas Jensen, 

a natiYe of Copenhagen, who dep.irtcd this life 

on the 3l8t Oct. 1820, aged 35 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Bafpiall, 
who departed this life 19th Novemher 1821, 

aged 38 years. 

This Monument is erected by her affectionate 

husband, Richard Bagnall. 

Sacred to the Memory of Richard Bafpiall, 

Senior Pensioner of the Military and Police Office, 

died 8th February 1847, aged 72 years, 

10 months and 22 days. 

Tliia tablet is placed by his afflicted widow. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John BapiaU, 

who died 6th April 1844, aged 25 years, 

7 months and 20 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. F. Q. Stacy, 
died 25th August 1831, aged 31 years. 

And of his son, Aog^ustas Thomas, died 18th 

Dec. 1831, age^ 4 years, 4 months, 10 days. 

Not lost but gone before. 

Within are deposited the remains of 

Sarah Frances Rosalinda, 

the dearly loved wife of 

The Rey. Henry Pratt, M. A. Chaplain to the 

Hon'ble Company, 

died 4th January 1831, aged 28 years 11 months. 

Few erer possessed so high a sense of her 
rdatife duties. None ever performed them more 

conscientiously. 

Tbe above was the eldest daughter of 

James and Sarah Hall, 

Grove house, Willesdon, Middlesex, England. 

Forgive, blest shade, the tributary tear 
That mourns thy exit from a world like this, 
Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here. 
And stay'd thy progress to the seats of bliss. 
No more confined to grov'ling scenes of night. 
No more a tenant pent in mortal clay, 
Now should I rather hail thy glorious flight 
And trace thy journey to the realms of day. 



In Memoir of Mrs. Anne Iiedlie Pratt, 

vriio died 28th April 1831, aged 31 years. 

Alto, Anes Mcliean Pratt, 

who died 17th November 1831, aged 12 years. 

The beloved wife and affectionate daughter of 

C. M. Pratt. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. John Cripps, H. C. Marine, 
departed this life 6th April A. D. 1831, aged 26 
years. In death lamented as in life beloved. 



1 Sacred to the Memory of 

I Capt. James Hector, of the barque Diederick a, 
I who departed this life on the 10th April 1831, 

aged 37 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

John Iiathbory TnTner^ of Exeter, 

many years resident at Colgong, 

who departed this life Jan. 19, 1832, aged 48 3rrs. 

leaving his widow & 7 children to deplore his loss. 

To the Memory of 
I'he Hon. Henry Davenport Shakespear, Esq. 

Member of the Supreme Council of India, 

who died March 20, 1838, in the 53d year of his age. 

Also of two infant daughters of the above, 

and Louisa his wife — Annette, 

who died Feb. 19, 1832, aged 4 ms. and 19 days. 

And Amelia Anna, who died March 8, 183B, 

aged 1 year, 1 month and 27 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Georf^ Sres, 

died 18th April 1832, aged 42 years, 

esteemed and beloved by all who had the pleasure 

of his acquaintance. 

Sacred to the Memory of IValter, 

infant son of H. S. Lane, Esq. of the Civil Service, 

who died Oct. 30, 1832, aged 2 ms. and 13 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of IJITilliani Orxunp, 
who departed this life on the 1 3th December 1832, 

aged 45 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Slisa Johanna, 
the beloved wife of Captain J. Satchwell, 

Assistant Commissary General, 

who departed this life 4th January 1833, 

at the premature age of 26 years, 

deeply lamented by her afflicted husband, cliildren, 

relations and friends. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Oatharine Penman, who departed tliis life 

on the 7th April 1831, aged 45 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

IXnniam Jan&es Alexander Dnncan, 

formerly of Madras, and late of Calcutta, 
who departed this life 13th Apnl A. D. 1831, 

aged 34 years and 10 days, 

deeply and sincerely regretted by a numerous 

circle of friends. 



Under this Monument 

is deposited all that was mortal of Tempe, 

late the affectionate wife of Edward S. Ellis, 

died 1st November 1820, 

deeply lamented by her afflicted husband. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Alexander Thellnsson, Esq. 

of the Hon'ble Company's Civil Service, 

who died at Calcutta on the 15th day of Nov. 1820, 

in the 21st year of his age. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

John Dyer, Esq. Superintending Surgeon, 

who departed this life on the 16th Dec. 1820, 

aged 56 years. 

To the Memory of Xklward Millett, 

born 29th Aug. 1801, died 15th Feb. 1821, 
aged 19 years. 



To the ISIemory of James Hales, 

Captain in the H. C. 21st Regt. Native Infantry, 

who died the 18th Dec. 1820, aged 35 years." 

Esteemed and regretted. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

John Zves Bosanqnet, Esq. 

who departed this life 20th December 1820, 

aged 26 years, 11 months and 4 days. 



144 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Charles Chaston Assey, E<tq. 

of the Medical Establishment of this Presidency, 

and Chief Secretary to the British Govt, of Java, 

until the restoration of that Island. 

He died at Calcutta, 21st March IS21, 

aged 41 years. 

Esteemed for his talents, beloved for his virtues. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Henry Alston, 
who died on the 30th March 1821, aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memories of Robert Svans, 
died 11th April A. D. 1821, aged 53 years, 

3 months. 

A nd his son Edvrard, 

who departed this life on the 2Cth day of July 

A. D. 1823, aged 13 years, 2 months. 

Entomb 'd within this humble cell doth lie, 
Entwiu'd in love and affectionate tie, 
A father and a son, to whose mem'ries dear, 
Have often been shed full many a tear ! 
To relate whose virtues, and living worth, 
Would seem to bestow on flattery birth ; 
Suffice it then to say that each was kind, 
Of manners gentle and unerring mind« 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Gkorg^e Elde Darby, Esq. 

who departed this life the 24th August 1820, 

aged 44 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
IV. R. B. Bennett, Esq. 
of the H. C. Civil Service, who departed this life 
on the 28th of June 1820, aged 34 years. 



1 o the Memory of Mr. John Sllerton. 

of Malda, who departed this life 16th of 

Sept. 1820, aged 52 years and 7 months. 

His Mem ory is ble ss e d . 

" To him to live was Christ, to die was gain.'' 

*' Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 
They rest from their labours and their works 
follow them." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain V^, B. Robert, H. M. 17th Ilegt. 
who departed this life June 30th, 1820, 
aged 33 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
John Fulton Meade, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 29th August 1820, 

aged 17 years. 



Also of diristopher Meade, Esq. 
who departed this life on the Ist of May 1823, 

aged 22 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. John IValker, 
1st Battalion 11th Regiment N. I. who departed 
• this life on the 7th day of June 1820, 
aged 23 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

J. R. de Beauregard, Esq. 

Captain 2d Bengal Native Infantry, Obit. 25th 

May 1820, yEt. 34 years. 

He was a good soldier and an honest friend. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mari^aret Jones, 

who departed this life Dec. 16th, 1829, 
aged 31 years and 5 months. 
This is dedicated to an affectionate wife, by her 
husband, R. £. Jones, in grateful remem- 
brance of her kindness of heart. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Richard Sastis Jones, 

who departed this life August 30tii, 1832, 

aged 45 years. 

This tablet is erected by his affectionate wife, 

Agnes Jones. 



Here lies the remains of 

a much beloved and lamented child, 

Richard Ooss, 

the infant son of Richard E^asties and Elizabeth 

Jones, who departed this life June 27th, 1820, 

of that dreadful disorder the Hydrophobia, 

having been bitten by a piah dog, three months 

before his death, aged 3 yrs. 5 mths. and 25 dys. 

Sweet Innocent ! thy pure soul will certainly 

be received by thy Creator and enter 

into the joy of thy Lord, which is the best conso- 

lation left to thy parents. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Anthony Ooss, 
who departed this life on the 12th February 1826, 

aged 64 years. 

To the Memory of Mrs. Elisabeth Jones, 

who departed this life Nov. 14th, 1822, aged 23 yrs. 

This is a tribute of sincere regard 

to an affectionate wife. 



Also to the Memory of Mr. Thoaaas 
Brother-in-law to R. E. Jones, who departed 
this life June 15th, 1821, aged 34 years. 

Erected to the Memory of 

Sdward Comls. IVederick Pike, Esq. 

by two friends who knew lus worth. He died 

on the 10th June, 1819, aged 28 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of ^ , 

the beloved wife of Robert Campbell, Esq. 

whose virtues in the various relations of life 

eminently endeared her to the whole circle of 

her friends, and all who knew her. 

Her gentle, affectionate and pure spirit, 

associated as it was with an artless, heartfelt piety, 

justifies the hope that thro' the Divine mercy 

of her ever blessed Redeemer 

her faith will have been accepted of God. 

Died 5th April 1820, aged 40 years and 7 months. 

Also to the Memory of Robert Oampbell, Esq. 

who survived her only a few months. 

He died on the 3rd September 1820, aged 52, 

having endured with the fortitude and 

resignation of a good christian, a 

of misfortunes for many years. 



This Monument in testimony of sincere regard 

to the Memory of Henry Ohristoiiher» Esq. 

late Commander of the Ship •* Charles Mills,'' 

who died in the 48th year of his age at Budge 

Budge, on the 11th July, A. D. 1817. 

Is erected by those of his friends who were 

enabled to appreciate those many manly virtues 

which characterized him thro' life as an 

officer and a man. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



145 



Sttcred to the Memory of Alicia, 
wife of William Leycester, Esq. 
of Uie Civil Service. 
Her many virtues, her sense of religion ; 
her practical devotion ; the sympathy she ever 
felt in the sorrows of others ; 
her exertions to soothe and relieve them ; 
the deep regret of her many valued friends and 
relatives ; her exemplary conduct in every 
vicissitiide of life ; the kindness of her domestic 
habits ; her unceasing maternal vigilamce ; 
the unshaken confidence and affection wliich 
ever united her to the bosom of a grieving husband, 
afford him the strongest hope, under heaven, 
that thro' the mediation of our blessed Saviour 
and Redeemer, she may be received into bliss 
eternal and happiness for ever. Amen. 
Bom 2d Sept. 1784 ; Died 23d Sept. 1821, 
agCMi 37 years. 

Here lie deposited by the side of a sister who was 

ever dear to her heart, the remains of 

Henrietta, 

the devotedly attached and tenderly beloved wife 

of Duncan Mcleod, Lt.-Col. of Engineers, 

whose grief for his own loss, is 

deeply enhanced by the reflection that 

liis children have in her sustained the irreparable 

privation of an affectionate and most judicious 

mother. Bom 7th Oct 1782 ; Died 28th 

Nov. 1830. 



In Memory of Charlotte Iieycester Ck>rdon, 

Che dearly loved child of George Gordon 
Macpberson, Esq. Bengal Medical Establishment, 

and Charlotte his wife. 
Bom 10th September 1838, died 5th Jan. 18 iO. 

" Suffer little children to come unto me, and 
forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of 

Heaven." 



To the Memory of IValter DaTidson, 

A Member of the Mercantile Firm of 

Hogoe Davidson and Robertson, 

who died on the 12th Sept. 1820, aged 40 years, 

sincerely lamented by all who had a 

knowledge of his worth. 



S acred to the Memory of 

Lieut, mniliam Forbes, R. N. 

Aged 25 years, son of Sir William Forbes of 

Craigivar, Baronet. Calcutta 4th October 1820. 



Sacred to the Memory of John Simson, 

third son of George Simson, Esq. of Fifeshire, 

who died at Calcutta on the 19th September 1820. 

aged 21 years. 

His da]ra were few, but rich in tliv promise of 

future excellence ; his affectionate warmth of heart, 

his candid and generous temper ; his honest 

ambition and rising talents formed in his life 

the pride and the delight of his family aiul his 

friends, and the recollection of his steadfEusttiess 

in the principles of Christianity 

forbids that those who survive to mouni 

for him should sorrow as without hope or 

consolation. 



Sacred to the Memory of ZSlixa MacDowell, 

wife of Captain MacDowell, Bengal Ai tilleiy, 

wlio departed this life 

on the 30th October 1820, aged 30 years. 



Here lie interred the moilal remains of 

Rebecca Bag^shawr. aged 37 years. 

Also of Oatharine Bag^hawr, aged 16 years. 

The wife and eldest daughter of 

John Bagshaw, Esq. of Calcutta, who 

on the 1 9th Oct. 1820, were in one sad moment 

drowned by the upsetting of a pinnace 

near the Armenian Ghaut. 

The afflicted husband and father, suddenly 

bereaved of the beloved objects of his affection, 

looks forward thro' the merits of his Redeemer 

to a re-imion with them in a better world, 

and desires at once to leam and enforce 

upon others this lesson of wisdom ; 

*' Boast not thyself of to-morrow, for thou 

knowest not what a day may bring forth." — 

Prov. 27. 1. 



This perishable Monument 

covers tlie revered remains of the late 

Georce Ewan Iiaw, Esq., 

of the Civil Service of Bengal. 

Natus the 28tli October 1 796. 

Obit, the 6th day of November A. D. 1820, 

iEtatis 24 years 

Erected by J. and C. Hayes, as a 

faint memento of their unceasing affection 

for the irreparable loss of their justly beloved 

and truly virtuous son-in-law, 1821. 



Buried here are the remains of 

Oeorg^e Evtran Iiawr, Knq. 

Late Principal Assistant hi the Secret and Politi- 

cal department of the Goveniment at Calcutta, ^c. 

lie Was the third son of Ewan Law, Esquire, of 

Horstcd place in the county of Sussex, 
formerly for many years chief of the Provincial 

Council at Patna. He was educated at 
Westminster School, and he married Charlotte, 
eldest daughter of Commodore John Hayes, 
Master Attendant of the Port of Calcutta, 
by whom he left two sons and a daughter. He waj 
bom on the 28th of October 1796, and died 
the 6th of November 1820, aged 24 years. 
No common sorrow lingers on his early grave ; 
tears from the deepest sources of affection honor 
the memory of one who possessed on extra- 
ordinary share of human excellence ; of strong 
and pure attachments, of noble and generous sjiirit 
of mild and modest manners ; with a clear and 
powerful understanding ; with an elegant and 
richly informed mind, firm in principle, zealous in 

action, he was marked from early youth as one 
that should reflect honour upon his family and his 

country. It pleased God to shorten his 

earthly pilgrimage yet so long was he spared as to 

have fulfilled the duties of each domestic 

obligation, and to be distinguished as an able 

servant of the public interests with that grateful 

sense of the mercies of Christianity wliich 
characterized his course through life. He resigned 

himself in death humbly and readily to the 

will of the Almighty. This taljlet is placed by his 

unhappy widow a Monument of his virtues 

and of the unbounded affection and respect. 



Master Thomas Thompson^ 

Bom 15th July 1805, died 17th July 1805. 

Mr. Thomas Thompson, 

Died the 24th Febmary 1807, aged 25. 

i\lr. Richard Oatton, 
Died the 22d May 1815, aged 39 years. 



u 



i 



146 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUKD. 



Here lieth the body of Irwin Lewis Rees, 

Son of John Mitford and Harriet Anne Rees, died 

16th December 1818, JEtatU 1 month and 

28 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr8.SliBabetlilVhite, 
Died (universally beloved for the sauvity of her 

disposition) on tlie 11th Sept, 1822, aged 33 years. 
*' I know that my Redeemer Uveth and in whom 

I believe." Her last words were *' I shall be a 

prisoner three hours longer.' 



t$ 



Sacrcil to the Memory of Mrs. Slimabetli Do'W^ 
born on the 12th of Oct. 1799, and died on the 
6th of May 1828, aged 28 years, 6 months, 

and 24 days. 

Tlie flower just nipped as it began to blossom in 

the parents' view. 

In memory of James* Brig^htmaa Dow, 

Aged 11 months and 14 days, died 24 March 1824. 

Mr. Sdward Brig^htman, 

departed this life after residing 39 years in India, 
on the 24th of February 1791, aged LXIII years. 

'i o the Memory of Mrs. Mary Brig^htman, 
wife of Mr. Edward Brightman, who departed 
this life on the 23rd February 1808, 
aged 21 years. 

Also of Mr. Jol&n Jaqnes Brie^htmaa, 

who departed this life on the 12th August 1807, 

aged 24 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Bdward Brig^htman, Visq. 
For many years a merchant of this city. Obit 26th 
December 1833, aged 52 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. SUsabetli Brig^htman, 

who departed this life on the 21st March 1801, 
aged 19 years. 

Too early lost ! just in thy bloom of youth, 
Go noblest pattern of unshaken truth, 
Absolved from earth, that peaceful shore ascend, 
"Where angels live and to their Maker bend. 

The infant son of 8. Swinton, Esq. 
Nat. 28th August 1809, Obit. 28th August 1810, 

James, the infant son of 
Samuel Swinton, Esq. of the H. C. Service, bom 
2nd September 1822, died 24th September 1822. 

Sacred to the Memory of A. H. Xrrine, 
who died 13th February 1818, aged 23 days. 

In this grave were enterred the remams of two 

children, Amelia Johnston Harincton. born 

16th April 1809, and died the 7th June 1811. 

IXfllliam Thomason Haiin^on, bom 

2nd October 1811, died 10th August 1812. 

** Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid 

them not, for of such is the kingdom of God." 

Mark xv. 14. 

In the vault beneath are deposited the remains of 

Captain Herbert Hawes, 

formeriy of the East India Company's Service, 

who departed tliis life on the 5th October 1832, 

aged 52 years. 
An honest man, in life respected, in death lamented. 



In Memory of Master J. F. Tnlloli, 
died 23rd May 1825, aged 15 years 6 monUis. 

Here lies interred the remaine of 

Bleanor ^^atson, 

bom 6th May 1751, and died the 19th of 

October, 1776. 

And also of Samuel IXTatson. her son, 
born 11th of October and died the 25th. 



Here also lyeth ye body of 

Mrs. Mary Ohapmaa, 

who departed this life on ye 23 of January, 

in ye year of our Lord 1784, aged 63 years. 

Universally lamented by aU that knew her ; being 

a pattern of virtue, pi^, charity, and friendship. 

No empty form of words are here ezpress'd. 

But simple truth as it's by nature dren'd. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Terrenee Karanaiph, died April I4tlil8'21, 

aged 44 years, 7 months and 8 days. 

Also Jolm KMwtakm^lkf 
aged 40 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Jam«s TnUoli, 

Bora at Campbleton near Fort George, Invemes- 

shire, North Britam.^Obit 29th August 1819, 

aged 44 years. 

In Memory of Miss Marj Taylor, 
Obit 18th August 1832, aged 52 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of the late 
Mr. JaioMlVad*, 

A native of Waterford, Ireland, and many years 

Senior Branch Pilot on this establishment, who 

departed this life on the 22nd day of April 1819, 

aged 75 years. 
Intelligent in his profiession, and intrepid in mind, 

he by his personal exertions saved the Uves of 

many, and in society he was highly esteemed for 

his honest heart and liberal hand, which were 

always open to his friends and the poor. 

May he rest in peace. 

Sacred to the Memory of Horatio Tonkor, Esq. 
Obit 27th February 1813, JSt. 62 years. 
Many years in the Civil Service of the India 
Company at Bencoolen. 
Also on the north side of this Tomb, 
Mrs. Pamela Tomar. 
Relict of the above. Obit 14th May 1816, 
iEt. 64 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Rev. David 1 
who was ten years Senior Chaplain at the 

dency and Provost of the College of Fort 

William ; he also held in trust the ministry of the 

Old Church one and twenty years. He died 

June 14th, 1812, aged 48 years. 

The Memory of the just is blessed. 

In Memory of Frances Oowlay, 

Daughter of the Rev. David Brown, and of 

Frances his wife ; she died Mardi 3rd, 1824, 

aged 18 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss M. A. R. SerentrOy 

who (lied 31st March 1816, aged 1 year, 6 months 

and 16 days. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



147 



Sacred to the Memory of IVUliam Iiayton, 
who died the 31st January 1816. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Soaannah Morrison, 

wife of George Morrison, who departed this life 

on the 3rd of October 1809, aged 28. 

Affection's last sad tribute. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jessy Scott, 
relict of the late James Scott, Esq. ; she departed 
this life on the 25th November 1818, in the Fifty- 
sixth year of her age. The virtues of humanity 
were possessed by her in an eminent degree, and 
her pure and intelligent mind was ennobled by a 
heart warm, generous and sincere, which rendered 

her esteemed and respected by all who knew 
her. Hub Monument is erected over her remains 
by her affectionate brother, John Hunter. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mary l^ells, 

the beloved wife of Mr. Joseph Wells, of the 

Pilot Service, who departed this life on the 17 th of 

June 1844, aged 35 years and 3 months, 

nnoerdy regretted. And also of their infant son 

James Tarenor IVells, 

■ who departed ^is life on the 16th September 

1843, aged 5 months and 16 days. 

Great Arbiter of life and death, 
I bow to thy decree. 
From thee first came the vital breath, 
I yield again to thee. 
Thou who canst dear the darkest day, 
Or doad the brightest sun. 
Grant me submission still to say. 
Thy work, O Lord, be done.'' 



u 



Sacved to the Memory of Mr. Joseph IXTells, 

Late Branch Pilot in the H. Co.'s Marine, who was 

inddenly snatched from the bosom of his friends 

after bearing with Christian-like fortitude for 
■even months, a painful trial of his Maker's will, 
leaving behind him a disconsolate widow and 
yoong children to lament his untimely loss. 



How blest that man who in retirement does find, 
The soft endearments of his bosomed friends, 
Whose social virtues lightens o'er his mind. 
With Christian fortitude against the world con- 

tbnds* 
Sodi WIS the partner of my worldly care, 
Such was the father of our dearest pledge, 
But death relentless teaches to beware. 
The fleeting joys that fill our transcient age. 

Died 21st March 1823, aged 42 years and 3 ms. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas IVells, 

of the H. C. Marine, who departed tins life on the 

Slst August 1833, aged 22 years and 8 days. 

Mary Clarissa, the beloved daughter of 

Joseph and Muy Wells, who departed this life 

24th July 1835, aged 15 months and 8 days. 

" Ihe Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 

blessed be the name of the Lord." 



Here lieth the infant son of 

Mr. H. T. Metcalfe, 

died the 29th day of December 1812, aged eleven 

months and twenty days. ** Of !)uch is the 

kingdom of heaven." 

u 2 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Alice Saunders, 
who departed this life 21st of May 1813, 
aged 34 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Saunders, 
died 24th of May 1829, aged 73 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Samuel Saunders, 

assistant at the M. A. G. office, who departed 
this life much respected and lamented, November 
20th, in the year of our Lord 1809, 
aged 22 years, 6 months and 27 days. 
A dutiful son and an affectionate mother, whose 
amiable and benevolent disposition endeared him 
to all who knew him. 

When blooming youth is snatch'd away 

By death's resistless hand. 

Our hearts the mournful tribute pay 

Which pity must demand ; 

But why bemoan departing friends 

Or shake at death's alarms, 

'Tis but the voice that Jesus sends 

To call them to his arms. 

Why then their loss deplore, they are not lost 

Why wanders wretched thought their tombs around 

All, all on earth is shadow 

All beyond is substance, 

How ])opulous ! How vital is the grave ! 
This is creation's melancholy vault. 
This is the desert, this the solitude ; 
The land of apparitions, empty shades, 
How solid all where change shall be no more. 



Sacred to the Memory of James Sampson, 
who departed tliis life 7th Novr. 1809, aged 50. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mar|B^aret Zna, 
who departed this life on the 30th January 1810, 

aged 45. 



Captain John Clement, of the Country Servioa, 
died 10th August, 1812. 



Sacred to the Memory of Joshua Slston, 

who departed this life 16th September 1813, 

aged 44 years, 

who was generous, benevolent and humane. 

possessing a mind adorned with many brandies uf 

scientific knowledge ; and a heart dilated 

with many social and manly virtues, who devoted 

the chief part of a life of industry, skill an j 

ingenuity to the service of his fellow-creatures. 

endeared by his varied talents and amiable qualities 

to his family and friends. He lived with 
independent fortitude, respected as a philosopher, 
and died with christian piety ; lamented as a 
philanthropist, this Monument is erected by his 
disconsolate Widow. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Isaac Qolledf^, 

Assistant Deputy Master Attendant, who 

departed this life on the 2d of April 1802, 

aged 44 years. 

An upright honest man, beloved and lamented by 

all who knew him. 



And also to the Memory of Mr. John OoUed^e, 

son of the above, who departed this life on 

the 15th July 1824, aged 22 years. 



149 



SOUTH PARK STREET BXHllAL GROUND. 



Sacreil to the ivremory of Mr. Francis Lemesle, 
who departed th'is life tlie I9th Oc-tober 1822, 

agrd 77 yeara. 

He was steward for upwards of 27 y«irs to the 

following (jovcmors and Governors General 

formerly in BcngiU : — 
The Right Hon'ble Earl Comwallis, K. G. ; 
Sir John Shore, Bt.; the Most Noble Marquis 
Wellesley, K. G. ; Sir G. H. Barlow, Bt. ; the 
Most Noble Marquis Comwallis, K. G. and 
Gilbert Lord Minto. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. E. • «•«•«•», 
who departed this life on the &th of January 1822, 

iEt. 43 years, 
much regretted by all who knew her. 
" Blessed are the dead tliat die in the Lord .'' 
Tliis Monument is erected by her affectionate 
friend, Mr. F. Leuiesle. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

INIrs. Blixabetli Hannah Dent, 

Obit 20th February 1817, Aitat 49 years and half. 

A Isu oi Elisabeth Catharine her daughter, 

aged one month. Likewise to 

Chas. VfFnt, Oibson, Esq. 

Obiit. 27th Sept. 1817, ^t. 47 years and half. 

Also 
Sacred to the ISIemory of Thos. Ross]>ent, Esq. 
who departed this life the 4th February 1821, 
aged 47 years and 11 months. 

Within this tomb is interred the body of 

Mrs. Elisabeth Oibson, 

eldest daughter of Thomas Felling, Esq. 

of Madras, Free Merchant, who departed this life 

on the nineteenth day of May 1801, in her 

fifty-second year. 

Her parents experienced in her a dutiful daughter, 

her husband a faithful and tender wife, her 
relations an equal and sincere aifection, the poor, 

a ready and compassionate supporter, and her 
children a steady friend and affectionate mother. 
With deep sorrow they lament their 
irreparable loss. 
Also sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Tk<nnas OHbson, her husband, 
who was interred near this spot in his thirty- 
second year, on the twenty.fourth day of 
November 1772. 



Sacred to the Memory of departed worth, 

Jan&es Scott, K^q. 

who died on the 19th of July 1816, aged 60 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Athanass, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 1st of Sept. 1835, 

aged 82 years. 
Despising ostentation and happy in retirement, 

the world knew him but little and appreciated 
him less, yet the i>oor whom that world n^lects 

will bless him for those ample prorisions, 
which his charity bequeathed to their wants. But 
it was in his family where all his affections 
centered, that his real virtues were displayed. 
Purity, veracity and piety evinced the good- 
ness of his heart, and the sincerity of his faith, and 
led his children to award this testimonial, and 
to love the father and revere the christian. 



Here Heth the body ofCIeori^ Athanass, 
son of John Athanass, who departed thi^ life the 
20th Sept. 1809, aged 19 years, 1 1 months, 12 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mt«s Sophia Athanass, 

daughter of John Athanass, who departed this life 

on the I9th May 1797, aged 6 years, 

10 months tnd 3 «fa^s. 

Oecilia, the infant daughter of 

Robert W. Poe, Esq. bom 21tt Nov. 1819, 

died on the same day. 



Sacred to the Memory of «»«Hry, 
the infant son of Captain H. Hesrman, H. M. S. 

and Eliza his wife, who departed ^is Kfie 
20th Oct. 1832, aged 1 yr. 1 month and 18 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomas Oeors« OlttrkSy 

who departed this life on the 17tfa August 1825, 
aged 7 months and 22 days^ 



Sscred to the Memory of Ji ■ mm^wwwkm^, 

the «on of James Colvin, Esq. who died 13tb 

Dec. 1814, aged 2 months and 8 days. 



Saered to the Memory of IXnilUm Jt..»w-, 
Uie infiint son of Robert and EUisa Strickland, 
died July 2d, 1828, aged 4 montfaa and 11 days. 

Thomas Howard Christfo. and Sarah 
Ohrlstia, 

whose remains are here interred, departed thb life, 
the former on the 14th of Febniary 1818, 
aged 5 months and 15 days ; 
the btter on the 1st of July 1819, aiged 8 months 

and 27 days. 

Ere sin could blight or sorrow fiule 
Death came with friendly care. 
The opening buds to heaven coovey'd. 
And bade them blossom there. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. , 

who departed Uiis life on the 17th of Fdb. 1799, 
i^ged xxxvii. years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
wife of Richard Bird, Esq. Solicitor, died 41 
Sept. 1833, aged 21 years and 11 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

DndlsT Robort Smithy 

(late Lt. and Adjt. of Grardnor's Local Hone.) 

Ob. June 10th A. D. 1826, Mt. 28 years, 

5 months 10 days. An affectionate husba n d, 

a tender father, a warm and nslons firiend. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Alexander RofperSy 

who departed this life on the 4th of Aug. 1814, 

aged 50 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of HfUUsoa Uoyd, 
died 6th May 1828, aged 10 months and 6 ilays. 

To the Memory of Thos. Qlllaiidsrs, Em«^ 
died 23d Feb. 1828, a^ed 59 years. 



To the Memory of 
the inCuit son of Maria Glass, 
who departed this life the 2l8t October 1 816, 

aged 1 year, 3 months and 21 dajrs. 
** And Jesus said unto them, suffer little children 
to come unto me and forbid them not, for of 
such is the kingdom of heaven." — ^Mark chap, 
la-v. 14. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



149 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Ohas. VKTilliains, 
late architect, died on the 28th November 1824, 

aged 45 years. 

lliifl Monament as a tribate of filial affection 

is erected by his son, A. W. 

In Memory of Master S. A. liamourouz, 

son of P. A. and Mary Lamouroux, 

who departed this life on the 11th October 1829, 

aged 1 month and 3 days. 



To the Memory of Master H. D. 8. Ross, 
died the 30th October 1819, aged 10 months 

and 8 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Hexury Herbert Barnes, 
son of Richard and Frances Barnes, 
who departed this life August 12th, 1823, 
aged 7 months and 18 days. 
** Tlw Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
bless his holy name.^ 



t» 



Slixa Picard, 
aged 24, died the 7th of May 1817. 

What tho' in death's embrace her body lies 
Her blameless spirit to its Maker flies, 
To taste those joys which heaven alone can give 
And in the presence of her Saviour live. 

Oatbsrine Jones, a^d 36. 
Departed tiiis life on the 14th of November 1821. 

Her meek, her blameless soul has wing'd its way 
To meet her God in everlasting day ; 
In realms of bliss, in endless joy to move, 
Cbeer'd by a Saviour's all redeeming love. 



Saered to the Memory of Captain John Mills, 

who for 14 years commanded the H. C.'s Yacht, 

the ' Charlotte,' bom in London the 2nd Nov. 

1734, and died on the 13th August 1814, 

aged 69 years, 9 months and 11 days. 

Sweet shades of departed worth Farewell, 
To bereft of thee, we still love to dwell * 
Onthyfond'memory, the theme we ne'er can forget 
Until life's 'ebb is o'er, until our sim is set. 

Inscribed by the widow and two sons. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Shearman, I>q. 

who departed this life 1st December 1815, 

i^ged 53 years. 

He was fSor many years, Register in the Revenue 

Board Office, a worthy, benevolent, humane, phi- 

lantropic character, sincerely beloved in life and 

Uwfk^ntmA in death by all who knew him. 

Saered to the Memory of Frederick Joshua, 

second son of Major Waters and Elizabeth his wife, 

who terminated his short career on the 1 7 th 

June 1823, aged 7 months and 17 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. 'William Youngs, 

late a branch Pilot in the H. C. Marine, 

who departed this life on the 2nd of Sept. 1821, 

aged 48 years and 25 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Margaret Ceams, 
wife of Mr. J. Cearns, Branch Pilot, who tie- 
parted this life on the 2nd December 1^38, 
aged 40 years and 1 month. 
Also an tnfont son bom 25th December 1828, 
died 30th December 1828, aged G days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs Elisabeth Younspi, 

wife of Mr. William Youngs, of the H. C. Marine, 

who departed this life April 25th, 1808, 

aged 26 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Sarah, 

wife of Mr. Charles Warden, died 29th Dec. 1825, 

aged 22 years and 28 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Peter Andrewr, Junr. 

who departed this Ufe 8th February 1822, 

aged 22 years and 1 month. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Gentloom Aviet, Esq. Junr. 
^ who departed this life on the 13th of 

September A. D. 1836. 

Tliis Monument is erected by his afflicted widow 

in token of her affection and esteem. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Jan&es Taylor, Jr. 

who departed this life on the 3 1st July 1834, 

aged 19 years and 2 months. 



Sacrc<l to the Memory of Miss Slisabeth Meller, 

who departed this life on the 23d September 

1834, aged 42 years and 13 days. 

Sacred to the ISIemory of Slisa Jane Fraser, 

daughter of A. B. and M. A. Fraser, 

who died 2d October 1822, aged 1 year 6 months 

and 22 days. 

Master Frederick Gillanders, 

the infant son of G. R. Gillanders, Esquire, 

Attorney at Law. 

Bom 19th March 1833, died 16th Sept. 1833. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Sleanor Oantopher, 

wife of Mr. Robert Cantopher of the Political 

office, bom 30th April 1805, Obiit. 22d March 

1829, iEtotis 23 years 10 months and 22 days. 

Excellentissima Sexus. 

As a record of conjugal affection, this tablet is 

inscribed by her grateful and afRicted husband. 

O early snatch'd from all who held her dear 

As friend, wife, mother, she was matchless here ; 

Virtue like her's, to earth is seldom giv'n. 

Too good to dwell with us, she 's gone to Heaven. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Mills, 

bom 15th November 1790, and departed this life 

8th May 1826, aged 35 years, 5 months 

and 23 days. 

She was an affectionate wife, a tender mother, a 

warm friend, a kuid mistress and 

a sincere Christian. 

Gentle Reader, if departed worth deserves a tear. 
Stop, and the pious tribute render here. 

Inscribed by her affeetionate husband. 



Sacred to theMemory of Mr. El- R. Stout, 
Master in the 11. C. Pilot Service, died on the 

6th October 1826, aged 29 years, 5 months 
and 21 days. Also his infant son aged 8 days. 

Mrs. Blisabeth Hudson, 
Obiit. October 22d, 1829, aged 35. 



150 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Junes Maanel, 
who departed this life on the 30th October 

1817, aged 15 years. 
This Monument is erected by his Godmother 
Mrs. C. Williams. 



In Memory of Oeorf^ Dic^by, 

son of John Davison Smith and Caroline his wife, 

who departed this life May 25th, 1827, 

aged 2 years and 3 months. In the same grave 

are deposited the remains of 

HenriTf their infant son, 

who died January 28th, 1832 aged 1 month 

and 18 days. 

In the same grave are deposited the remains of 

Chas. Alexander, their infant son, 

who di^ 2d June 1833, aged 2 mons. and 2 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of * 

Mrs. Mary Hubbard 
died 3d August 1834, aged 27 years. 

Mrs. John Florence, 

died 22d July 1835, aged 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Hng^h Moor, 
who died 14th Sept. 1834, aged 17 years. 



To the Memory of T. H. IXnikineon, Esq. 
late a Purser of the ship ** Barossa," died 14th 
July 1824, aged 35 years. 

In Memory of Mr. Gkorg^e Seeberjr, 

who died the 27th Oct. MDCCXCIV. 

aged 32 years. 

In Memory of Maria Ora^irford, 
died 13th Dec. 1832, aged 60 years. 

To the Memory of Mr. John Sheppard, 
died 9th May 1828, aged 29 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain R. N. Haram, 

died the 25th Nov. 1819, aged 37 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Robert «««»»», 
Late Midshipman of the H. C. S. '* Mangles,'' 
and brother to her Commander, aged 14 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. R. D. Oabell, 

Assistant Assay Master in the H. C. Biint, 

Calcutta, who died on the 31st January 1817, 

aged 26 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. P. Templeton, 

Obit 20th day of January 1817, aged 23 years. 

This Monument has been erected by her friends to 

perpetuate the Memory of her they in life 

respected and in death revere. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. IXTm. Roacoe, 
died 25th Jan. 1832, aged 45 years, 3 months 

and 9 days, 
Sincerely regretted by his affectionate widow. 

'Tis God that lifts our comforts high, 

Or sinks them in the grave, 

He gives, and blessed be His name, 

He takes but what he gave. 

Tn INTemory of Mim Charlotte Bamilton, 
eldest daughter of Mr. H. Hamilton, Surveyor, 
Madras Establishment, who departed this life on 
the 13th of November 1824, aged 2 years, 
4 months and 19 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of John 
inftmt son of Sarah and Captain John Hall, of the 

Hon'ble Company's Bombay Marine. Qui Obit 
nth of May A. D. 1817, aged 9 months 5 days. 

Sleep sweet babe ! removed from cun'd miifor- 

tunes pow'r, 
Free from the tempest's blast here rest in peace ; 
Wither'd in ite bud, nature's tend'rest (low'r. 
Angelic babe, my darling, rest in peace ; 
How few ite days, how sure death s unerring dart, 
(Alas ! soon as the blooming child began,) 
That pierc'd oh ite poor litUe ftntt'ring heart. 
And dash'd a parent's hope in the growing man. 
Sleep on my babe, for heaven's aU rigfateoos King, 
Hath to lasting summer, chang'd thy short liv'd 

spring. 

** Suffer little children to come unto me, and 
forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of 
God, and he took them up in his arms, pat his 
hands upon them, and blessed them." — St. Bfark, 
X. 14, 16. Y. 



In Memory of Mrs. M. Oonraa, 

who died 7th September 1824, aged 18 years 

and 10 months. 



Mrs. 






died 8th December 1824, aged 22 yean 



7th 



In Memory of Marsraret, 
wife of J. W. Roberto, H. C. Marine, 
August 1837, aged 28 years. 

Within this silent tomb, 
A wife, a mother sleeps. 
In whose calm breast, 
Peacefiil virtue dwelt. 

Ardour of affection, humble views of self, and 

faith in God. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. D. J. Mnnynrd, 

H. C. Pilot Service, who departed this life 

October 26th, 1827, aged 34 years. 

Also J|pe, his wife, died 15 days after, aged 35 yean. 

In death they were not divided. 



Sacred to the Memory of i.^.^.^, ..wwvmv, 
who died 8th Nov. 1833, aged 14 ym. 25 days. 



P. Delaah. 

Obit 10th April 1804, ^t. 25 
The tribute of a inend. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

MrB. Marg^aretlXTrulity 

Widow of the late Mr. James Wright, who 

departed this life on the 5th Aogost 1833, 

aged 48 years and 3 months. 

Imucj Bleanora Priest, 
Obit 21st January 1832. 

Round Heaven's high throne myriads of angds 

throng, 
Another angel comes, each wafts the sound. 
Then to the Almighty soar'd in grateful song. 
And '* Hallelujahs" through &e vast expanse 

rebound. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain DIT. B. DaTioMMSy 

who died on the 2l8t October 1827, 

aged 30 years. 



i 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



151 



to the Memory of Adelaide Jaae, 
aft daughter of J. Rerely of Penang, 
Jtnnary 1837. 

the Memory of Mr. TTiniliani Sealy, 

1 the 23d April 1820, aged 22 years. 

Beneath lay the remains of 

Captain Charles Dew, 
x>iintry service, who died on the 22d 
Nov. 1824 1 aged 42 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
[rs. Slisa Jane IVUkinson, 
i late Conductor Wilkinson, who died 
le 28th Dec. 1827» aged 60 years. 



femory of Mrs. Mary Locken, 
. R. Locken, H. C. Marine, bom 15th 
rch 1802, died 4th March 1829. 
oot of the above, Richard James, 
13d Dec. 1819, died 4th June 1821. 

And Joseph Henry, 
)th July 1821, died 10th June 1824. 

the Memory of Q. A. Home, 
farch 1830, aged 4 yrs. 1 month, 8 days. 

meath are deposited the remains of 

Mrs. Ann Shepherd, 
d 28th January 1818, in the fortieth 

jear of her age. 
mory this pillar is erected by her yery 
te husband, the Rev. Henry Shepherd, 
or Chaplain at this Presidency. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Anne Smn&er, 
f the late John Bentley, Esq. bom 26th 
•b. 1797, died lltii Dec. 1827. 
a Monument has been erected by 
)Bentley, as a tribute of sincere mater- 
tioii to Uie memory of the deceased. 



EnUly Corrie, 

* of the Rererend D. Corrie, died the 
one 1815, aged 6 months and 18 days. 

Memory of Mr. IJITilliani Myers. 
L2th of July 1758, died the 19th of 
January 1817. 

B know that if our earthly house of this 
were dissolved, we have a building of 
(Hiae not made with hands eternal in the 
—2d Cor. T. ch. 1 ver. 



Sacred to the Memorv of 

€kor|^ Twin, child of 
d Emilia Barton, died 19th Nov. 1822, 
aged 16 months and 6 days. 

OkorifS IXTalter Smith, 

th April 1831, ^t. 8 months 10 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Captaio Darid Miller, 
Commander of the H. C. C. Ship 
-- " died 16th Jan. 1829, aged 42 yrs. 



am 



Sacred to the Memory of 
fohn Bethnne IngUs, Esq. 
irted thia life on the 25th April 1821, 
aged 39 years. 



Also Slisa, wife of John William Inglis, Esq. 
died 7th August 1839, aged 32 years. 

In Memory of 
Henry Atkins Phillips, 

infant son of Mr. Henry Phillips, 
died 11th Sept. 1826, aged 2 years, 7 months 

and 4 days. 
** The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.'' 



This last tribute of affection is consecrated 

by her husband. 

To the Memory of Elisabeth Harwood, 

who resigned this life on the 4th of March 1815, 

^tat 27 years. 

No laurels crown her weeping urn. 
Nor wisdom's pride proclaim her fame. 
Yet virtue's lamp holds out to bum. 
And sheds sweet fragrance o'er her name. 
Unstrain'd by follies of the g^'eat, 
From scenes of envy far remov'd, 
She knew no malice, knew no hate, 
By all esteemed, by all beloved. 
Connubial love inspir'd her heart, 
Of each endearing gift possess't, 
Her only care was to impart, 
The charms with which her mind was blest. 
Sleep, then, fair virtue's daughter, here. 
Until the final trump shall sound. 
Thy God for thee shall soon appear. 
And raise thy form with radiance crown'd. 

Sacred to the Memory of Robsrt OKbson, 

of Denmark Hill, Surry, who departed this me 

6th February 1823. 

Bom in the parish of Slains, Aberdeenshire, 

North Britain, A. D. 1759. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Richard Pauling^, 

who died 20th October 1822, aged 39 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mary Panlinff, 

relict of the late Richard Pauling, who departed 

this life on the 22d March 1824, aged 28 years. 

Memoris Sacrum GKbson, 

Obit September Ist, Anno Domino 1813, 

^tatis suae 24. 

Also to the Memory of 
Oeorg^e Thomas GKbson, 

who departed this life the 5th of Dec. 1826, 
aged 43 years. 

Mr John Gke, bora 27th of August 1791, 
died 30th of March 1830, aged 38 years 7 months. 

Michael SUder, died 29th March 1830, 
aged 51 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Master T. V. Soady, 
died 22nd March 1830, aged 10 years 4 months 

and 20 days. 
" The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. O. A. Maither, 

who daparted this life on the 17th March 1826, 

aged 26 years and 7 months. 

This tomb is erected by her most affectionate 

friend, Mrs. E. Taylor. 



152 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Mr. Junes Garrod, 

died 16th May 1830, aged 25 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. R. N. Carter, 
8on of the Rev. W. Carter, Rector of Ashted 
Surry, late of the Ilon'ble C.*s Bengal Marine, 
who was unfortunately washed overboard from 
the floating light vessel Torch, in the dn^ful 
gale of the Sand Heads on the 27th May 1823. 
lie was a pious Christian, a true friend and affec- 
tionate son. All who knew him loved him and 
sincerely lament his loss. Aged 21 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Maun, 

died on the 18th November 1827, ag^ 80 years, 

1 month and 10 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Charles Flemingf walker, 

late chief officer of tlie Ship " Bombay Mer- 
chant," died 22nd July 1819, aged 23 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Miss Susan Yonng^i 

daughter of W. Young, Esq. of Batavia, 

who departed this life on the 25th May 1823, 

aged 9 yean. 

Also Miss Christiana Yoan|^, 

who departed this life on the 5tb March 1826, 

aged 14 years. 

Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord, even 
so says the spirit, for from henceforth they rest 
from their labours. 



In Memory of ISIr. Charles Browen, 

died 1 St Jan. 1830, aged 36 years. 

Highly esteemed and sincerely regretted. 

Alfred Gillanders, 

Ob. 25th Feb. 1836, Mi. 5 yrs. 3 ms. and 16 dys. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

IStrs. Slisabeth Jalla, wife of Mr. Paul Jalla, 

who departed this life on the 3rd May 1829, 

aged 22 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Sarah, wife of Mr. R. Sansum, 

died 15th October 1821, aged 30 years. 

A sincere christian. 
The memory of the just shall be blessed. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

MisH IssabeUa Sarah Jolee, 

who departed this life on the 21st Oct. 1836, 

aged 17 years, 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mils Issabella Oio s s we l ly 

died nth Jan. 1823, aged 11 yean and 8 months. 



In Memory of Mrs. Marj Ann Soott, 

died 23rd May 1831, 
aged 17 years, 6 months and 23 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs, J. Boehe, wife of Captain J. Roche, 

died 30th Nov. 1833, aged 24 yean. 



Sacred to the Bfemory of 

Jane Ann, daughter of N. and J. Fdiologus, 

who died 30th November 1833, 

aged 4 years, 3 months and 7 days. 



Sacre<I to the Memory of ! 
who departed this life on the 23rd of Bfay 1823, 

aged 62 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. J. O. Oonrani 

son of the late Major Henry Conran, 

who departed this life on the 18th March 1829, 

aged 29 yean. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss J. M. Conran, 

daughter of the late Migor Henry Conran, 

who departed this life on the 23rd Sept. 1829, 

aged 36 yean. 



HENRY CONRAN, ESQ.— (La/e a Major in hu Britannic Mqfeiiy's Sermee.) 

This Gentleman entered at an early age into the service of his country, and was sent with his regi- 
ment during the glorious War of 1735-6 to America, where he had the honor to serve nnder the im- 
mortal Wolf ; and was present in 1759, at the death of that Hero, in the battle fought on the heighths 
of Abraham, near Quebiec ; he served subsequently under Lord Townshed, and assbted in the rednctioa 
of the Capital, and province of Canada at the close of the war he returned to Europe, and after some 
time retired from the army on half pay. — Major Conran came to India by way of Aleppo, and the great 
desert, about the year 1780, in charge of a packet from the Court of Directors to the Bengal Government, 
which service he performed with expedition and success. Mr. Hastings, the then Governor General, 
appointed him an Aid-de-Camp, and Private Secretary, in which situation he remained, till the 
return of Mr. Hastings to Europe, in 1785, since that time Major Conran generally lived in Calcutta 
much esteemed by his friends and acquaintance. He had a paralytic stroke about two yean before hu 
death which deprived him almost entirely of the use of speech, and his right arm was also so much 
aifected, that he was unable to write ; nevertheless he continued cheerful and in good spirits, ei^oying 
with unimpaired delight, till within two days of his death, the rational amusements of reading and 
8{)eculating on the events of the day. He died at Calcutta, on Friday evening, the 15th of May 1810, 
at the advanced age of 72 years. 

(The /of lowing In»cription is taken from his Monument in the North Ground :) 

Sacred to the Memory of Major Henrj Conran, 

who departed this life on the 15th of May 1810, aged 72 years. 

This stone is placed to his Memory by a beloved and sincere friend. 



SOUTH PARK STKEET BUUIAL GROUND. 



153 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Scott, 
who deputed this life on the 12th January 1821. 

aged 46 years. 

» ■» 

To the Memory of James Rattray. 
He was bom on the 5th May 1776, and closed an 
faonorable and useful life as second Judge of tlie 
FroYincial Court of Dacca on the 13tb Feb. 1818. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Keymer, 
of the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life 24th June 1819 aged 34 yrs. 
liiis Monument is erected as a la.sting 
testimony of his virtues by his affectionate 
brother, James Keymer. 
Adieiii my friend, a long and sad farewell ; 
No thought can utter, nor no tongue can tell, 
The pangs I feel at the dear word farewell. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jane Keymer, 

wife of Mr. James Keymer, Junior, 

of ^e Hon'ble Company's Bengal Marine, 

who departed this life on the 1st October 1822, 

aged 23 years, 1 month and 1 1 days, 

after a few days illness which she bore with 

Christian patience and fortitude. Her amiable 

and yirtuous disposition and good temper, 

rendered her dear to her relations and friend.<t, 

and an irreparable loss to her afflicted and 

disconsolate husband and parents. 

lliii Monument is erected by her mother as a 

record of her devoted attachment, and as a token 

of affectionate remembrance of her 

exemplary worth. 

"The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away." 

Id Memory of IJITilliam Henry, 
inlk&t son of Mr. 6. H. Keymer, U. C. Marine, 
died 16th July 1828, aged 1 year, 9 months 
and 14 days. — Job. Ist chap. 21 v. 



To the Memory of 

Mrs. Sarah De lianong^erede, 

wife of Mr. L. DeLanougerede, who departed this 

fifeToesday 26th Sept. 1826, aged 27 years, 

11 months and 10 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of the still-born infant of 

Gjsbert Van Voorst, and of Louisa Elizabeth 

his wife, 21st May 1830. 

" SniFer little children to come unto me for of 

such ii the kingdom of heaven. And he took 

them up in his arms, put his hand upon them and 

them."— Matt. x. 14—15. 



Sscred to the Memory of Lavinia Adeline, 

ddeet daughter of Mr. J. R. and Mrs. M. J. 

Camp, bom 11th Oct. 1817, died 28th Dec. 1821 

■* Of such is the kingdom of God." 

And her sister, Matilda Nancy, 

bora 19th Not. 1819, died 27th April 1827, 

both sincerely and deeply regretted by all. 



Also of their mother, 

Matilda Jane Camp, who died 9th April 1842, 

aged 45 years, 2 months and 2 days. 



Hie infent ton of Stephen Parker, bom 5th 
October 1834, died 26th May 1835. 



In Memory of Mrs. E. Barwrell, 
who died on the 9th Jane 1826. aged 37 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of G^org^iana, 
the daughter of George Powney Thompson, Esq. 
of the Civil Service, and Harriet his wife, who 
departed this life 26th May 1838, aged 10 months. 

To the Memory of Mr. Charles Bowbear, 
Obit. 5th May 1824, aged 28 yrs. and 9 luos. 
" Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, 
for the end of that man is peace." 

In Memory of Mr. C. D. Bakker, 

who died 7th May 1827, aged 19 years. 
This tomb is erected by his mother. 



James Gk*ant Yates, 

bom 28th Nov. 1823, died 19th May 182 J. 

Here lie<; the bo<ly of James Moore Hunter, 

who died 10th June 1816, aged 21 years, 

to whose memory this tribute of respect and 

attachment is erected by his friends. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain Saniuel Massing^ham, 

born at Holt, in Norfolk, departed this life 29th 

April 1824, aged 37 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Jan&es Ferrier, Junior, 

son of James Ferrier, Esq. of Juanporc. who 

dt^parted this life the 28th April 1827, aged six 

vears, four months and ten davs. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Master John jyOjlj, 

who departed this life on the 29th April 1824. 
aged 4 years and 6 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Mills, 
who died Jan. 25th 1826, aged 29 yrs. and 7 mos. 

With gentle manners and with modest worth. 
Meekly he spent his dcstin'd course on earth, 
Beloved, and most by those who knew him best, 
Deep were liis kindness on their hearts im- 

press'd ; 
The dutious son, fond father and kind friend. 
Are each deplor'd in his untimely end. 

Sacred to the Memory ol Master Peter Mills, 
who died February 9th 1822, aged 6 years, 
9 months 9 davs. 

• 

Thou dearest child, my once delight, 
Where art thou gone ? now left my sight ; 
1 hope ui heaven an angel bright, 
To live with Christ by day and night. 
Yet still thy absence I deplore. 
Until my soul to heaven shall soar. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Peter Mills, 

who died the 16th February 1818, in the 56tli 

year of his age. 

The unaffected simplicity of his heart, joined to a 

life of virtue and piety, must ever make his wife. 

his children and his friends lament his loss. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Abraham James. 
Printer, son of Major Abraham James, Obit 1 1th 
November 1828, at the age of 32. 

By nature form'd for erery social part, 
Mild were his manners and sincere his heart. 
This Monument is erected by his affectionate 
wife, Louisa James. 



1.W 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to xUo Miinory oi James Stenvari, Esq. 
who tlcpartcil this life on the 17th June 182S. 

Dt'neath thi< humble stone now rests enshrin'd, 
Alas ! what onre enclosed the purest mind, 
Yet whilst he k-avos us for his kindred skies, 
See from the expiring flame a Phoenix rise, 
By the same liand se\'erally kind was given, 
To us a man, and a saint to Heaven. 
Adieu, bless'd shade, alas too early fled. 
Who knew thee living but laments thee dead ; 
A soul so calm, so free from every stain, 
So tried by torture and unmov'd by pain ; 
Without a groan with agonies he strove, 
Ileav'n wondering snatch'd him to the joys above 



Sacred to the Metriory of Mr. Abraham James, 

who departed this life on the 4th August, 1834, 

aged 1 7 years, 1 1 months and 29 days. 

Here lies the tenderest son, brother, friend ; 
His life with goodness mark'd, with grief his 

end ; 
His mind was calm, O may his soul have rest ; 
He gave to ev'ry Chrbtian virtue scope. 
And what liis practice was is now his hope. 



This Monument was erected by Mr. and Mrs. 

Moris, 
To the Memory of Master Jno. Thos. Smith, 
who departed this life on the 12th April 1814, 
aged 2 years and 7 days. 



Here lies the remains of Benjaioain Turner, 

For many years an Attorney of the Supreme 

Court of Judicature of this PrMidency, and one of 

the oldest British inhabitants of this plaice. A man 

who to high professional character and 

attainments, united a primitive simplicity of 

manners, and an unbounded benevolence of heart, 

discharged the duties of civil and social life 
with exemplary propriety and fidelity, and in the 
several relations of husband, father, friend, and 
fellow-citizen was uniformly actuated by princi- 
ples of the purest rectitude, by the warmest 
and most generous emotions of the soul. Respect- 
ed by the community in which he dwelt, beloved 
by his fi-iends, reverenced by a numerous family, 
he closed an honorable and useful career on 
the 7th day of July 1819, in the 66th year 
of his age, 
after enduring with unshal^ fortitude, and with 
the meekness and resignation which becomes a 
Christian, the torments of a protracted and 
excruciating disease. 
Here also is deposited the body of 
Benjaioain Tomer, Junior, 
his second son and successor in business, the 
early partner of his tomb. A man of the most 
upright and honourable principles, cut off by the 
ravages of a cruel disease on the 12th day of 

April 1821, in the 25th year of his age, 
affording a memorable warning, that " in the 

midst of life we are in death.*' 

In testimony of his worth and of her affection, 

this stone is inscribed by his afflicted widow, M . T. 



To the Memory of ^Vllliam HoUingni, £$q. 
Obit 10th October 1815, aged 45. 

This last melancholy and affectionate tribute is 
paid by his wife Sophia, He was distinguished 
during life for his virtues, and an enlightened and 
benevolent mind. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. S. HoUini^s, 
who expired on the 10th August 1831, 
dged 50 years. 
Deep and sincere was the grief which her losi 
occasioned ; she was a faithful wife, an affec- 
tionate mother and a truly benevolent woman. 
Long will, the memory of her virtues be cherished 
by her afflicted family, by whom this Monu- 
ment has been erected as a tribute of affection, 
and as a proof that they were not unmindful 
of all she had endured for their sake. 



Mr. John OhrUff, 
died nth May 1808, aged 39 yean. 

Mrs. Oatherins OhrUffy 

died 10th May 1816, aged 32 yean. 
This Monument is erected by their aflectionate 
son, W. G. Grieff. 



Sacred to the Memory ef Mr. J. S. drant. 
who died on the 7th Feb. 1837, aged 27 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 



bom Nov. 30th 1810, died May 23d, 1827. 



In Memory of O. A. Thi 
died 15th May, 1833, aged 28 yean. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Charlotte Franeos Breen. 

who departed this life on the Gth April 1833, 
aged 2 months and 27 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Aii&s Oatherine, 

wife of Mr. John Goldsmith, who died on the 

7th April 1824, aged 21 yean, 8 months 

and 25 days. 

May her soul rest in peace. 

This himable testimony of their esteem has been 

erected by & few friends^ 

To the Memory of Sdward BIiin^hy« E»q. 

Died 8th March 1832, aged 20 yn. and 9 mot. 

Mr. Samuel Stons, 

Died 4th June 1846, aged 24 yesn. 

In Memory of Martha Slisabath, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth Gash, died 11th 

June 1 836, aged 9 months and 22 dm. 
Also to the Memory of Mrs. EUsabstii Oash, 
wife of Mr. John Gash, who departed this life on 
the 6th June 1838, aged 34 yean. 

Miss B. M. Oash, died 5th JafM 1846, 
aged 8 yean. 

To the Memory of Mr. CharlM BveUandy 
died 4th March 1836, aged 52 yean, one moath 

and 4 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. B. M. Qee, 
born 14th April 1808, died 30th Nov. 183:^- 



Charles, son of Wm. Mathews, Esq. 

of Juanpore, bom 6th December 1817, and «^*^ 

24th April 1827. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margraret Sophia Bold, 
relict of the late Capt. Hugh Atkins ReiJ • 
who departed this life at Calcutta on the 2^^ ^ 
June 1833, aged 59 yean. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



ldi> 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Youni^, 

who departed thia life 22d April 1823, 

aged 40 years. 

Here lies the bciy of Mr:*. Ann Ridg^e, 
who departed this life on the 31st Dec. 1828, 

aged 68 years. 
This Monument is erected by her son as a tes- 
timony of his affection to a good mother. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Ireland, 

born 25th Dec. 1819, died 29th Aug. 1833, 

deeply and sincerely regretted. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Paul Kellner, Esq. 

formerly a Lieutenant in the Wirtemberg Regt. 

who departed this life on the 29th Dec. 1822, 

aged 55 years and 6 months. 

In Memory of Master Qeorge May, 
son of Capt. John Frederick May, 
^ed 31st March 1834, aged 7 years and 10 mos. 

Boger Shine, Obit. 30th May 1831. 

In Memory of Catherine, 
bom 11th and died 16th Nov. 1823. 
And Robert, born Ist and died 10th Nov. 1824, 
children ox John and Catherine Payne, Jr. 



Also of Mr. John Payne, Sr. 
died 16th May 1826, aged 53 years. 
And of his son John Payne, Jr. 
^^ho died 20th Dec. 1833, aged 34 years, II mos. 

and 26 days. 
Inscribed by his afflicted mother. 



Saered to the Memory of Alexander Forbes, 

fon of Major General John Forbes, 
who departed this life at Sooksaugur on the 16th 
day of November, A. D. 1823, aged 45 years, 
4 months and 20 days, leaving liis afflicted 
wife, Fanny Forbes and children to deplore his loss, 
who erected this Monument as a tribute of es- 
teem and regard to a most pious, affectiouate 
and fond beloved husband. 
** The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



To the Memory of Mr. C. N. Phillips, 
kte nu^geon of the Ship " Victory,*' who was 
drowned on the 12th of May 1836. 



Id Memory of Mi*s. Jessy Randolph, 
the dearly beloved wife of Henry Randoph, of 
Chittagong. She died January 19th, 1837, aged 29 

yean, 9 months and 27 days, 

fenvii^ three infant children and a disconsolate 

husband to deplore their loss. 

" Tlioiigfa He slay me, yet will I trust in Him." — 

Job xiii. — 15. 



Mr. N. Davies, died 29th July IU3G. 
aged 36 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. B. IX. Daunt, 

who died 15th May 183(. nged 28 years. 

Erected by his afTectionate widow. 

Sacred to tlie Memory of Mary, 

^iff of Mr. John Collins, who departed this life 

the 12th March 1822. aged 36 years. 

X 2 



Sacred to the Memory of Sliaabeth, 

wife of Mr. James Montgomery, ship builder 

at Sulkeah, who departed this Ufe on the 18th 

Sept. 1820, aged 25 years. 
And also two of her children, who died youug. 

Here lies the infant son of Daniel and Amelia 

Cordozo, Obit. 13th July 1827. 
O fairest flower, no sooner blown but blasted. 



Sacred to the Memory of Master P. R. H. Smith, 

bom 18th January 1823, and departed this 
life 12th May 1826. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Smith, 
of Terrl. Dept. son of Samuel Smith. 

Long time with grief surely 
And disappoint't was I sore oppress'd, 
At last kind death has eas'd me. 
And I comfortably lay here at rest. 

Died 19th Dec. 1820, aged 19yrs. 11 ms. 17 ds. 

Sacred to the Memory of Alexander Salter, 

Shipwright, who died 2d September 1824, 

aged 29 years, 8 months and 8 days. 

Here lies the infant son of H. T. Travcrs, Esq. 
Obit. 21st February 1805. 

Miss Maria Anne Donclas, 

eldest daughter of J. R. and M. IS. Douglas, 
died 10th June 1833, aged 16 years, 
10 months and 8 days. 
Here lies beneath the earthly sod, 
A flower which pleas'd both man and God ; 
With dying lips she thus did call, 
Jesus my life, my love, my all. 

J\f rs. Maria Elisabeth Dong^las, 

wife of Mr. J. R. Douglas, died 26th Dec. 1819, 
aged 20 years, 4 months and 9 days. 

To the Memory of Mr. James Reynolds, 
Obit. 16th Sept. 1817, iEut 17 years. 

Here lies beneath this monumental stone 
A youth to fortune and to fame unknown, 
Afflictions sore long time I bore, 
Which wore my strength away, 
And made me long for endless rest 
That never will decay. 

Mary Anne Francis, daugrhter of 

the Honorable Andrew and Rachel Ramsny, 

is entcrred here. Born 7th June 1820, 

died 18th January 1822. 



In Memory of Master R. G. I>ixon, 

infant son of Mr. J. Dixon, H. C. Marine, 
born 29th July and died 31st July 1822. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieutenant John Anderson, R. X. 

Commander of the Ship, ** Katharine Stewart 
Forbes," died 8th September IHM, 
aged 42 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

MiHs Mary Susan Gomes, 

who departed this life on the 1 2th Dec. 1825, 

aged 3 years, 7 months and 13 days. 

And her sister, Sarah Ann, died 12th 

Oct. 1828, aged 2 years. 



i 



156 



SOUTH PARK STREET BUR lAL GROLWD. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Elimab«tl& Qotnea, the wife of Mr. 

Domingo Gomet, who departed this life 28th 

Sept. 1817, aged 37 years, 
leaving a beloved husband and eight children 

to lament their loss. 

** Be not slothful but followers of them who 

through faith and patience inherit the promise." — 

Heb. vi. 12. 
Life how short, eternity how long. 

In the cold earth Elizabetli, rest, secure, 
Nor fear those ills which once thou didst endure ; 
No pain, nor sickness here can reach thy bones, 
Then sleep in hope within these sculptured stones. 
Once shalt thou rise to see thy Saviour's face, 
And share the bounties of his promised grace. 
How lov'd, how valuM once avails thee not ; 
To whom related, or by whom begot, 
A heap of dust alone remains of thee, 
'Tis all thou art and all the proud shall be. 
She died a few hours after the birth of her 
fourteenth child, September 28th, 1817, 
in the 37th year of her age. 

Sacred to the Memory of Thomaa Robinson, 

son of Thomas Robinson, Commander of the 

Ship •• Intrepid" of Hull, died 6th Nov. 1833, 

aged 14 years, 6 mouths and 8 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Mathow Smith, of Howrah, 
who departed this life 11th Nov. 1822, aged 54. 

In Memory of James Moffat, 
Surgeon of the *' Phoenix," East Indiaman, 
who departed this life October 31, A. D. 1788, 
aged 55 years. 

Also of Mr. John Moffat, brother to the above, 
who died A. D. 1791, aged 56 years. 

This humble tomb is erected by William Moffat, 
son of the abovenamed James Moffat, who com- 
mandedthe ''Phoenix" at this port in the year 1800. 

Sacred to the Memory of Richard Brooks, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 10th Nov. 1822. 

aged 28 years and 4 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Helen Marian Xng^le, infant daughter of 

Lieut. H. Ingle, 2nd Bn. 15th R. N. I. 

Obit. 3 August 1823, ^tat 6 montlis 17 day. 

Sacred to the Memory of Marianne, 

daughter of the late Lieut. -Colonel Muller, 

who died on the 1 1th August 1833, 

in the 38th year of her age. 

Mrs. Xionisa Peat, 

wife of W. Peat, Master Pilot, who departed 

this life 8th January 1833, 

aged 23 years, 5 months and 20 days. 

To the Memory of jCaptain \irilliam Peat, 
(A friend of the poor,) who departed this life be- 
tween Diamond Harbour and Kedgeree, on board 

the Steamer ** Forbes," on the 17th of June, 

A. D. 1837, and enterred at the latter place, 

aged 41 years, 

leaving four disconsolate children to bemoan their 

irreparable loss. 

** He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto 
the Lord, and that which he hath given will he pay 
him again." — Prov. xix. 17. j 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Joseph Matlh«irs, 

who died 8th Nov. 1822, aged 50 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Slisabeth Matthews, 

who died 23d March 1839, aged 75 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Harriet McKenny, 

who departed this life 4th Angost 1824, 
aged 13 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Anne Martha IMITall, 

who died 4th of August 1833, aged 7 yean 

and 7 days. 

Also, Harriet Jane IKTall, 

died 23d July 1834, a ged 2 years, and 8 months. 

And Qeorjre William IKTaU, 

Volunteer H. C. B. Marine, who was drowned 

19tli October 1837, while learning to swim, 

aged 14 years, 8 months and 17 days. 
His unassuming manners and mild disposition 
endeared him to all who knew him, particularly 
his disconsolate parents, who are left to 
bewdl his loss. 
" The Lord gave and the Lord bath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Robert Bwinly. 

late Branch Pilot H. C. Bengal Marine, 
I who departed this life on the lltfa January 1824, 

aged 90 years. 



Also Mrs, Ann Swinlj, his wife, 
who departed this life on the 21tt July 1832, 
aged 90 years. 
Erected by T. Scalkn. 



) 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Iiooisa ScaUan, 

who departed this life 6th Febroary 1810, 
aged 24 years. 
Likewise her five diildren. 
"%Ie.ssed are the pure in heart, for they shall 
see God." — Mat. c. 5. ▼. 8. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Oeori^ Ommp, Lsq. 

who died on the 9th of Dec. 1824, aged 54 years 

3 months and 9 days. 
Here lies the tenderest husband, father, friend ; 
His life with gooduess marked, with grief his end 
His mind was calm. Oh ! may his soul have reit. 
And he who others bless'd, himself he bless'd. 
He gave to every christian virtue scope, 
And what his practice was is now his hope. 
As a grateful tribute to his memory, this Monis 
ment is erected by his affectionate widow 
and children. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mils M. 8* Ommii^ 
who departed this life on the 25th July 1832, 
aged 15 years and 2 months. 



Suered to the Memory of Mr, Jamti 

who departed this Hfe 2Sd January 1830, 
aged 40 y^san. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



157 



Iso in Memory of Harriett, 
ho died 3d Feb. 1834, aged 29 years 
and 3 months. 



be Memory of Mr. Thomas ZZig^ipi, 
iparted this life 24th March 1852, 

aged 42 years, 
kiso in Memory ot Harriett, 
10 died 24th Oct. 1828, aged 24 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Thomas Jessop, 

loved wife of George Jesiiop, Esq. 
ed this life 8th June 1834, aged 29 yrs. 
2 months and 22 days. 

of Goorg^e Edward Jessop, 
. son of George and Mary Jessop, 
irtad this life 28th AprU 1827, aged 
4 months and 4 days. 

le Memory of Thomas Brace, 
int son of T. B. Swinhoe, Esq. 
I on the 22d August, died on the 
2l8t September 1828. 

Aaiputa Elixa, 

aaghter of Thomas Bruce Swinhoe, 
ley at Law, bom 11th Aug. 1819, 

died 10th March 1820. 
such is the kingdom of heaTcn.'' 

in of Robert Swinhoe, Esq. born on tlie 
7 1830, died on the 3rd June 1831. 

Caroline Sarah, 
f Robert Swinhoe, Esq. bom 18th day 
iber 1831, died 2d day of Oct. 1832. 

he Memory of Mr. John Roxburg^h, 
I7th September 1823, aged 46 years. 

oiiiment, as a tribute of affection, is 
his disconsolate widow, Catherine 



the Memory of T. P. Qennoe, 

9th September 1832, aged 39 years : 
aghter, Sarah Ii. Oennoe, born 16ih 
er 1830, died 19th September 1834, 
aged 4 years and 3 day. 

^^^."^■^."■^"^ 

In Memory of 
■ Bllen Oatherine Oennoe, 

ed Ist October 1835, aged 6 years, 
8 months 15 days. 

Stored to the Memory of 
Mr. B. M. R. Richmond, 

»d this life on the 8th Febmary 1837, 
18 years, 1 month and 13 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
hantL Marfraret Helen Oook, 
r of the late J. R. Cook, Esq. Indigo 
rho departed this life on the 29th April 
Sed 14 years, 2 months and 16 days. 
h is the kingdom of heaven." 

Memory of Mr. James BXannd, 
28th July 1825, aged 16 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
fohn Hennr Qninand, Esq. 
ttah, who died 18th of April 1790, 
aged 30 years. 



Also of his son, 
Lieut. Robert Samnel Gtiinand, 

of the H. C. Artillery, who died 15th of October 
1810, aged 22 years. 

Death with his dart did pierce my heart. 
Whilst 1 was in my prime, 
My friends most dear your grief forbear, 
'Twas God's appointed time. 



Sacred to (he Memory of Slisa Alfred, 
died 14th Aug. 1827, aged 12 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. David Ohnrcher, 
who departed this life the 28th of August 1824, 

aged 27 years. 

Sincere in friendship and in dealings just, 
In every action equal to the trust ; 
Such was the man whom God to us had given, 
So soon to merit and to enter heaven. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. ZX. F. Ohnrcher, 

who departed this life on the 31st October 1833, 

aged 28 years, 9 months and 2 days. 
** The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



Here lies also the remains of the infemt son and 

daughter of Henry Francis and Eleanor 

Churcher ; the former departed this life on the 

18 th December 1825, and the latter on the 

1st June 1830. 

Ere sin could blight or sorrow fisde, 
Death came with friendly care. 
The opening buds to heaven convey'd. 
And bade them blossom there. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. S. Fallon, 
Mate in the H. C. Pilot Service, who died 22d 

September 1823, aged 28 years. 
He has left a disconsolate widow and 2 children. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Abraham Bailey, Esq. 

late of Jessore, Indigo Planter, who departed this 

life on the 5th September 1822, aged 46 years. 

Also to the Memory of ElimabeUi, his wife, 

who survived him only 3 months and 

19 days, aged 48 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Maria IKTattell, 

who died 11th January 1822, aged 32 years. 

I rest in hope. 



Oeorg^e IT^fiUiam, son of Digby William and 
Elizabeth Shuttleworth, aged 8 months. 



To the Memory of John Parsons, Esq. 
who departed this life the 3rd day of Aug. 1824 

aged 39 years. 



In Memory of the infant son of Major Fast, bom 
12th and died 13th July 1823. 



Sacred to the Memory of Samnel Qreentrajr, 
bom 29th October 1802, died 27th July 1811, 
the eldest son of Samuel and Rose Anne Green- 
way. He was a child of great promise. 



158 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Mrs. Amelia Horn, 

the widow of Captain John Horn, died 5th Dec. 
1818, aged 41 years. 

Here are enterred the mortal remains of 

Mrs. Elisabeth Jones, 

who died the 26th September 1819, aged 51 yrs. 

This Monument was erected by her eldest son, 

W. R. Jones. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. A. K. Penninf^on, 

who departed this life on the 6th December 1821, 

a^ed 33 years ; and on the 8th, 

Rebecca K. Pennington, 

aged 5 years and 2 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Master R. R. O. Pennington, 

who departed this life on the 10th of Feb. 1823, 
aged 6 years, 3 months and 5 days. 

Mary Elisabeth, 

daughter of Thomas and Sarah Waterman, bom 
20th May 1822, died 2d August 1823. 

Saored to the Memory of James Penrose, 
son of C. B. Francis, Esq. Surgeon, died 16th 
January 1834, aged 13 months and 11 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Master J. IKT. Johnson, 
who departed this life 24th of September 1822, 

aged 1 7 years, 1 month and 24 days. 
This stone is put up by his affectionate mother, 

and relations. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Swinden, 

late superintendent of the Government Park at 

fiarrackpore, who departed this life 23rd Feb. 

1819, aged 31 years, 

deservedly and sincerely regretted by all who had 

the pleasure of his acquaintance. 

The husband, father, fnend sincere. 
In death's cold embrace lies buried here, 
Untimely nipt in the bloom of life. 
Leaving two children and loving wife. 
Who in deep distress sheds iiffliction's tear. 
For their husband, father, friend, sincere. 

As a tribute of regard to the Memory of her late 
husband, this stone is placed by his disconsolate 

widow. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Joseph IVeldon, 

late Branch Pilot in the Hon'ble Company's 

Marine, who departed this life the 25th January 

1815, aged 50 years. 

Living beloved, in all relations true. 
Exposed to follies but inclined to few ; 
Reader — reflect and copy if you can. 
The social virtues of this worthy man. 



Sacred to the Memory of the late 
Captaiu Robert Beek, 
died 22d July 1821, aged 64 years and 2 days. 
Boreas' bl<|8t and Neptunes* waves have tossed 
me to and fro. 
But to an anchor I am come and safely here below. 
And at an anchor I do ride with many in the fleet. 
And once again we shall set sail our Lord and 
Christ to meet. 

Also to the Memory of Mr. Robert Beek, 
son of the late Captain Robert Beek, died 27th 
October 1822, aged 16 yrs. 5 mos. and 23 days. 



I To the Memory of Elisabeth Marr, 

' daughter of Mr. H. T. Metcalfe, Obit 7th Sept. 
1813, i£t. 4 years, 1 month and 18 days. 
'* Of such is the kingdom of heaven." 

A. A. and Mam's 
infant daughter, buried 11th December 1837. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Master Richard Smith, 

who departed this life on the 24th July 1821, 

aged 9 years, 8 months and 14 days. 



Master Ohas 
died 23rd August 1821, aged 9 years. 

This stone thy parents' love would shew, 
This verse their grief would bring to view, 
Thy parents' love, their deep distreaa, 
Nor stone can shew nor words express. 

Sacred to the Memory of Doctor Joha Ohear. 



Sacred to the Memory of ^«**— 
daughter of A. H. and Eliza Smith, who departed 
thU life on the 3d of April 1815, 
aged 2 years, 5 months uid 11 days. 



Here lies the remains of 

who departed this life 12th of June 1823, 

the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Moore. 



S acred to the Memory of 
IXniliam Beckford OordoB, 

A Senior Merchant in the Service of the Hon'ble 

East India Company, who departed this life on 

the 7th day of November in the yesr of our Lc»rd 

Christ one thousand and eight hondMl and 

seventeen, in the thirtieth year of his age. 



To the Memory of Mr. Josspk I v««| 
Deputy Register in the General Department, 
who departed this life 30th of July 1827, 
aged 52 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Peter DttvidflOOy Esq. 

late of Bhaugulpore, (originally of Flndhoni, 

Morayshire,) who died in Calcutta on the 29th 

July 1821, aged 32 yetn. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Alexander Broee, 
who died the 29th Sept. 1816, aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Sophia OaroUne, 

the beloved and only child of Henry James and 

Marie Emelie Frederick, died 23d Sept. 

1835, aged 1 year, 6 montfai and 17 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Oarolias, 

the fourth beloved child oif Henry Jamoe and 

Marie Emelie Frederick, died 6th F^. 1841, 

aged 4 months and 15 days. 



This tomb was erected by lieiit. Wm. Pouter. 

in memory of his brother Ensn. iTim— Pmijf i 

who died the 30th of Augt. 1779, aced 26 year* 

Also his son Frederie Stnckley Forster, 

who was bom the 22d of July 1776, 

and died the 16tfa of Jaly 1780. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. H. E. Reid, 

the wife of Mr. Js. Reid, H. C. Marine, 

who departed this life on the 28th July 183^ r 

aged 17 years, 3 montbe and 14 days. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



159 



red to the Memory of IV. R. — ..•^».^, 
) departed this life on the 28th Oct. 1818. 
be Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
1 he the name of the Lord/' 



ed to the Memory of Mr. A. O. Forshatr, 
itie Master in the H. C. Bengal Marine,) 
died 13th May 1833, aged 33 years. 

7 months 22 days. 
[now this also that the Lord hath chosen to 
If the man that is godly.'' 

Sacred to the Memory of Isabella, 
of T. W. Sumners, who departed this life 
he 26th of Augnst 1818, aged 18 years, 

1 month and 21 c^ys. 
Alto of her infant child, aged 8 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Sd^rard, 
» departed this life on the Slst May 1824, 
aged 8 months. 
And IVilUam ZSdmeades, 
followed his brother on the 1st July 1824. 
aged 6 years. 
Sons of David and Anne Shearman. 
be Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. 
d be the name of the Lord." 



eaeath this Monument are deposited the 
mortal remains of 
Sir Jolm Hadley JyOjlj, 
yf Sbottisham in the county of Norfolk, 
. Baronet, who departed this world on the 

5th day of Jan. 1818, aged 64, 
r deplored by his surviving family. He was 
Illy exemplary in all the relations of life, 
and above all distinguished as a pious 
and sincere Christian. 



the north grave of this Monument repose 
iie remains of Mrs. Sophia Crahley, 
1 U^ Feb. 1808, died 17th March 1833, 

aged 25 years 22 days. 
oetessed of every virtue that adorned the 
fiib and the Christian, she was excelled 
f few in the practice of either of those virtues. 
sr early loss will ever be deeply lamented 
r memory will be deservedly cherished, by 
r afflicted husband, who pays this small 
A gratelnl tribute to her departed worth. 
■tdi tiierefore for ye know not what hour 

your Lord doth come." 

In Memory of ZZenry, 
nAoit son of Mr. Henry Tyler, of Calcutta. 
t. 8th Jan. 1819, Obit. 18th Aug. 1819. 

diesi death hath nipt this early bloom, 
dttered paternal hopes, maternal love, 
igiBshed feelings look beyond the tomb 
lidi beholds him soar to realms above, 
parents weep and sorrowing, drop the tear, 
[enry's lov'd remains lie buried here ; 
ong, so good, so truly gentle, mild, 
latare own'd him for her fairest child. 



(ere resteth the remnins of J. IV. laish, 
who died the 15th November 1830, 

aged 17 years 11 months. 
tone is erected in token of sisterly affection, 
by Mrs. H. Holmes. 

To the Memory of 
Captain Fredarick Monat, 
the country service. Obit. 2d Nov. 1826. 



In Memory of SUsabatli, 
daughter of Mr. J. Dyer, H. C. Marine, 
bom 5th March and died 22d July 1828. 

Sacred to the Memory of Qeorg^ Rill. 
son of David Hill, Esq. of the Madras Civil 
Service, died the 25th of Nov. 1819, 
aged fourteen months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Julia Oook, 

who departed this life on the 6th March 1825, 

aged 7 months and 8 days. 

To the Memory of Miss S. R. AadrewUf 
who departed this life 5th Oct. 1833, aged 14 yrs. 

and 25 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. S 
wife of the late Mr. T. Andrews, Post Master at 
Diamond Harbour, who departed this life on 
the 18th July 1820, aged 45 years. 

Also to the Memory of 

the late Mrs. S. Yovng^, 

wife of Mr. N. Youngs, and daughter of 

T. and E. Andrews, 

who departed this life on the 10th April 1821, 

aged 27 years. 



Also to the Memory of 

the late Mr. T. Andrews, 

Deputy Harbour Master at Calcutta, and son of 

T. and E. Andrews, who departed this life 

on the 10th Sept. 1821, aged 29 years 

and 11 months. 



Here lies interred the still-bom daughter of 
R. Alexander, Esq. 11th July 1822. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. M a rg a re t Hollh&fpi, 

who departed this life on the 6th Jan. 1807. 

She lived respected and died lamented. 

Here lie interred the remains of 
Mr. DaTid OgilTy. 
of the Madras Medical Establishment, and son of 
the Rev. Dr. Skene Ogilvy of Aberdeen. 
He was a young man of a kind, affectionate dis- 
position, and of the most correct and honorable 
principles. He departed this life on the 3 1 st 
day of Oct. 1814, at the early age of 
twenty-one. 



Sacred to the affectionate Memory of Sophia, 

wife of T. M. Howe, died 9th October 1818, 

aged 23 years, 3 months 9 days. 

Oft fond remembrance with the silent tear 
Will to the mind renew past scenes of life. 
And wringing anguish echo to the ear, 
The tender mother, fond and virtuous wife. 



To the Memory of Hugh H. Parks, Ksq. 
who died the 14th of Nov. 1811, aged 43 years. 



In Memory of MissE. M. Stacey, daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Stacey, died 24th April 1827, 

aged 5 years, 2 months 6 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. R. IXT. IKTaddir, 

Register and Accountant, Marine Board Office, 

Obit. 12th Jan. 1833, aged 32 years, 

10 months and 24 days. 

This tablet is placed by his afflicted widow, Phoebe. 



160 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Mary Jan« Allen, 2nd dauf^hter of 

Mr. and Mrs. Smyth, bom th« 29th Nov. 1800, 

died the 6th April 1819, aged 18 years, 

4 months and 7 days. 

A child reposes underneath this sod, 
A child to memory dear — ^and dear to God ; 
Rejoice ! yet shed the sjrmpathetic tear, 
Mary Sophia lies buried here. 

Daughter of Henry and Maria Humphreys, 
died 21st April 1829, aged 2 years, 7 montlis 

and 24 days, 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Maria ZZnmphreini, beloved wife of 

Mr. Henry Humphreys, of the H. C. Marine, 

who departed this life on the 4th December 1837, 

aged 31 years, 11 months and 14 days. 



John F. Orossley, aged 18 days. 

Here lie the remains of 

a dear infant, the daughter of R. DeOoorcy, Esq. 

who died on the 30th May 1822. 



To the Memory of Robert, 
son of Captain Anstruther, 6th Lt. Cavy. 
who departed this life on the 24th Dec. 1824, 
aged eight months. 

To the Memory of Olirer, 
son of Henry and Elizabeth Young, who died 
May 10th, 1818, aged 6 months and 2 days. 
*' Of such is the kingdom of heaven. '' 

Sacred to the Memory of John Coverdale, 
Post Master at Kedgeree, Obit. 29th July 1815, 

ag^ 36 years. 

Ennobled by the virtues of his mind, 
Constant to goodness arid in death resigned , 
Who placed true practice in a wise retreat. 
Privately pious and unknown tho' great ; 
Sure in silent sabbath of the grave 
To taste that tranquil peace he always gave. 
O ! early lost in virtues foirest prime, 
Thy pieties supplied life's want of time, 
No death is sudden to a soul prepared, 
When God's own hour brings always God's re- 
ward. 
Thy death, (and such, O Reader, wish thy own) 
Waa free from terrors, and without a groan ; 
Thy spirit to himself th' Almighty drew. 
Mild as His sun exhales the ascending dew. 
This Monument is erected to his dear Memory 
by his unhappy widow. 



To the Memory of IVilliam Jefferies, 

Obit. 28th Sept. 1823, iEtat 3 months 27 days. 

Also Tnrton Joseph, 

Obit. 2nd October 1823, iEtat4 months. 

The twin sons of John Jefferies and Henrietta 

• Hooper. 



Sacred to the Memory of Sarah, 

wife of T. G. Gunter, of the Town Hall. 

Obit. 20th January 1822, iEtat 36 years. 

As a wife, mother, daughter and sister, she was 

exemplary, and her loss will long be felt by 

her sorrowing family. Her virtues could not be 

surpassed, as such her memory will ever last. In 

remembrance of those virtues this Monument is 

erected by her husband. Also of their infant, 

aged 2 months. 



This stone is placed OTer the remain of 
John Eng^lish, who died on the 13th July 1816. 
in the 36th year of his age, uniTersally resetted 

Saocred to the Memory of Sareh Roamlie, wife of 
James Robinson, Esq. She died July 19th 1818, 
aged 34 years, and in the same grave are buried 
the remains oi James Robinson, E^q. 
Assistant Surgeon on this EstabUshment, 
and Superintendent of the Insane Hospital. 
He died June 22nd 1819, aged 33 yean. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Harriet Besboronerh Stafford, 

daughter of Lieut. -Greneral Hugh Stafford, 
who departed this life on the 29th April 1817, 
aged 1 year, 6 months and 28 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Capt. _ _. 

of the 29th Regt. of B. N. I. died 20th Aug. 1818, 

aged 43 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Miss Charlotte Reynolds, 

who departed this life 10th September 1817, 

aged 10 months and 14 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Captain John Ramsay, 

late Barrack-Master of Fort William, who 

departed this life the 20& August 1818, 

aged 38 years. 

Peace — everlasting peace to him. 

Here lies the body of Edward IKTUtohaad, 
of Philadelphia, who died on the 13th June 1818, 

aged 19 yean. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Jnlia Ann Oatharmo, 

wife of Captain George Swiney, of the Regiment 

of Bengal Artillery, who departed thb life tibe 

22d of Apnl 1818, aged 23, 

sincerely and deeply lamented by his femily and 

friends. Likewise the body of her infant son, 

Oeori^ Remsworth, aged 9 months and 

15 days, who died 16th May 1818. 

To the Memory of 
Alejtander Oordon Canlfiald Esq. 

whose premature death occasioned as deqp and 

universal sorrow, as his personal wordi, great 

talents and happy manners had inspired respect 

and conciliated affection. He was drowned in 

crossing the river opposite this city in company 

with his intimate friend, T. Abraham, 1^. on the 

evening of the 28th March 1818, aged 42 years. 



To the Memory of Thonuui , 

of the Civil Service, whose public and private 
worth was familiar to every soul who knew him. 
A long course of useful official labours had estab- 
lished his reputation for indefatigable seal, and 

the simplest and purest integrity, whilst his 
private life was an unbroken series of benerolent 
sacrifices for tlie welfare of his fiunily and connec- 
tions, and of the indigent and unfortunate in 
general. He was drowned in crossing the river 
opposite this city, on the evening of the 28th 
March 1818, aged 52 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Robert laony, Esq. 

of the Bengal Medical Establishment, who died 

2Ut March 1818, aged 47 years. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



161 



Sacred to the Memory of 

John Gharles Barnard, 

born 15th Aug. 1817, died 4th May 1818. 

Grandson of firig. Genl. Philip D. A'vergnei 

whose remains are adjacently interred. 



Smcred to tha Memory of Philip D'Ayerg^nf!, 
General on the Bengal Establishment, 
who departed this life the 3l8t day of 
March 1818, aged 55 years. 



To the Memory of Jan&es Jameson, Esq. 
Snrgeon, Secretary to the Medical Board, 
who died 20th January 1823, aged 35, 
aarwiaDy respected for his talents and acquire - 
BCBBlit u wdl as esteemed for every social virtue. 
Here lie the loving husband's dear remains, 
Tbfi fouler father and the generous friend. 



Here lies the body of 
Milt Q^orsiaaa Tweedale Maeleod. 
^iter of John Macleod, Esq. of Coibecks, 
who departed this life on the 10th of 
April 1818, aged 19, 
deeplj rqpretted by all who knew hor amiable 
qnalitief . This Monument has been 
crcf^ed in testimony of her affection for the 
departed saint by her cousin, 
Jane Elizabeth D'Oyly. 



Sacred to the Memory of Major James Gk»rdon, 

Deputy Adjutant General to the Bengal Army, 

who after a lingering illness departed this life on 

the 12th of June 181 7, in the 35th year of his age. 

Bleat with an enlightened and a virtuous mind, 
Mi^jor Gordon in every situation displayed those 

qualities and professional talents which had 

early raised him to distinction, and had the fairest 

prospect at no distant period of enjoying in 

his native land, the well earned reward of a life 

■pent in the performance of his duties, but it was 

otherwise decreed, and his early fate affords 

anotiier lesson of the utter vanity of all human 

▼iews that do not look beyond the present state, for 

his friends can now only dwell with pleasure on 

those circumstances of his life which led them to 

hope he has exchanged the chequered scenes of 

tnmsitory existence for the joys of eternal bliss. 

Sacred to the Memory of Sarah Catherine, 

the daughter of Lieut. V. Jacob, who departed 

this life Apr il 5th 1821, aged 1 yr. and 3 months. 

IfVUliam C. R. Jacob, 
died 18tii July 1827, aged 6 months and 18 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of I 

Sir John Royds, Knight. 
who for more than 20 years held the high office of ' 
one of the Judges of his Majesty's Supreme i 
Court of Justice at Fort William in Bengdl, during 
which period he conscientiously discharged his 
important duties with honor to himself and with 
advantage to the public, while he benefited and 
adorned the society in which he lived by the 
bcnerolence of his disposition and the accomplish- 
ments of a scholar and a gentleman. Died on 
the 24th September 1817, aged 65 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
James l^illiam Gh'ant, 
infant son of James William and Margaret Grant, 
horn in Calcutta, March 24th. 1822, 
died June 13th, 1822, aged 3 months, 13 days. 



In Memory of a beloved child, 

Ohu'les Palmer, 

the infant son of William Davis, Esq. died 21st 

Sept. 1822, aged 1 year and 5 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Oeorge Hunter Oh*ant, 

died 10th May 1821, aged 2 years and 10 mos. 



Sacred to the Memory of Charles Child| Esq. 

who departed this life on the 9th of July 1817, 

aged 99 years and 10 months. 

AUo Mrs. EUsabeth ChUd, 

Obit. 31st July 1822, aged 63 years and 8 moi. 

Sacred to the Memory of Andrewr Kelso, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 28th of June 1817, 

aged 40 years. 

Erected to the Memory of Mrs. Ann SHeld, 
who died 3rd October 1817, aged 37 years. 

Mrs. Zsahella Evans, 

who departed this life on the 20ch Sept. 1835, 

aged 40 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
John Emestns IXTehstar, 

Capt. 22d Regt. N. I. who departed this life 
Jan. 20th, 1822, aged 35 years. 

John A. O. Jameson, 

son of James and Frances Jameson, died 13th 
March 1822, aged 11 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Samnel Iiangpnaid, Esq. 

who departed this life at Doorgapore, on the 10th 

of April 1821, aged 42 years. 

To the Memory of 

Ensign H. Rassell, 20th N. I. 

died 10th November 1835. 

Erected by his brother officers, as a lasting 

tribute of their regard. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Edward FitaOerald, 

late Capt. in H. M. 87th Regt. died 11th 
Dec. 1821, aged 46 years. 
'Diis stone is erected as a token of regard by his 
brother officers. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Qeori^e l^alter Gavanaiph, 

late Capt. in H. M. 87th Regt. died 18th 

May 1822, aged 39 years. 

This stone is erected as a token of regard by his 

brother officers. 



In Memory of Thomas Ronald Gamphell, 

son of Mr. John Campbell of Riccarton, 

who died on the 14th February 1821, 

aged 18 years. 



Si^cred to the Memory of Mr. 
(Head Tide-waiter, Calcutta Custom House,) 
who departed this life on the 3l3t Dec. 1836, 
aged 77 years and 2 months. 
Sincerely regretted by a large fai^y 
and numerous friends. 
Also hitf two sous, James. 
! died 6th Oct. 1819, aged 14 yrs. 9 ms. & 2 days. 

IKTUllam. died 4lU May 1822. 
I aged 33 years, 1 month and 4 days. 



i 



162 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Matilda Brown, 

wife of Mr. Thomas Brown, who dq)arted 

this life on the 2d December 1833, 

aged 22 years, 9 months and 20 days. 

AUo lier three sons, Thos. Henry, 

died 5th Septoinber 1H27, aged 8 mos. & 5 days. 

Samuel Georgce. died 13th iVIay 1830, 

ap;cd 5 mcmths* and 21 days. 

TboB. Alexander, died 17il» April 1835, 

aged 2 ycura, 11 months and 10 days. 

TNIr. D. Koasack. IMaster Pilot, 
in the HouorHble Company's Service, 
died laih September 1802, aged 40 years. 

Sacred to the !Memorv of Robert Baird, Ksq. 

who departed this hfe on the 30th May 1821, 

aged 30 years. 

Stteie<l to the iSIemory of Miss H. M. Cropley, 

isho deptuted this life on the 23d of May 1821, 

ac^oil 1 year, 7 months and 14 days. 

Also ol Mary. wi!e of Kdward Cropley, 

who died 22d Dee. 1827, aged 45 years. 

Al«*o to the Memory of Mi-^s O. O. Cropley, 
who died on the river off the village of 
Uourepore Matta. near Berhampore, 
Nov. 12th, 1831. aged 20 years. 

SiMTed to the .Memory of Matilda, 

daughter of Christopher and Caroline Matilda 

Blake, died 30th of May 1837, 

airtd 2 years, 1 month and 14 days. 

'• Till- Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. 

ble.-M;U be the name of the Lord." 

Also in ^Icmory of Charles Delph. 

von of Charles Lifford and Charlotte Maria Smartt, 

difd 2d Dec. 1811, aged years and 13 days. 



?!.crf'd to the Memory of Ati(>pistnB Felly. E^jq. 

Lieut. R. N. who died on the 28th July 1820, 

aged 26 years. 

Sucrtrd to the Memory of Lieut. P. J. Demoor, 

of \{. M. 17th Begiment, who departed this 

life on the 29tli Sept. 1820, aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mathew Pickering, 

late of His Majesty's 17th Regt. died at 

Fort William, 3d Oct. 1820, aged 30 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieutenant Henry Xieivellin, 

of H. M. 24th Regiment Light Dragoons, 

Obit. 11th October 1820, 

aged 38 years, 9 montlis and 13 days. 



Sacred to the ISIemory of Mr. J. IV. Sarel, 

Chief Officer of the Ship Golconda, wlio departed 
this life on tlie 7th August 1822, aged 25 years. 



To the Memory of Miss Sliza Rov«re, 

who departed this life on the 14th June 1821, 

aged 3 years and 6 months. 

Sacred to the ISInmory ofLieut A. Ste^rart, 

11. M. 17th Regt. who departed this life 

March 22d, 1819, aged 35 years. 

This Monument is erected as a token of regard 

b\ his brother officeri$. 



This MonumeDt is erected by an afflicted sbter 
to the memory of an only and b^oved 
brother, C^eori^e Bttijamin* KeMi«, 

departed this life on board the *♦ Sophia*' Pilot 
Schooner, March 27th, 1819, aged 31 year*. 
" Je^us saith unto her, thy brother ihaU 
rise again. — John 11. v. 23. 

In Memory of James TonMialat, Esq. 
died Ist September, 1836, aged 21 years. 

Sacred to the Memo^ of 

Capt. IV. M. Thomson. H. M. 17th Regt 

who departed this life April 5th, 1819. aged 34 yn. 

This ^Ionum(;nt is erected as a tribate of 

esteem by his brother officers. 

Sacred to the Memory of Charlss Zismbert, Eiq. 

son of the late Anthony Lambert, Eeq. 

fonnerly a merchant in this city, who departed 

tliis life on the bth July 1819, aged 25 years. 

Sacred to tlie Memory of James MsltOB Jones, 

Harbour Master at the Port of Calcutta, 
who departed tliis life on the 25th day of April 1819, 
aged 4 1 years and 5 months. 
Peace to thy shades, adieu departed worth, 
Alas ! here merit moulders into earth. 



I'o the Memory of Jans, 

daughter of Thos. B. and Mary Scott, 

died 5th May 1819, aged 7 years and S months. 

Also Peter, died 13th December 1824» 

aged 9 mouths and 5 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss Zsabslla Thomas, 

who departed this life on the 15th of Nor. 1818, 
aged 16 years. 

John Zaamb, died lOih May 1820, aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Joseph Thooison, Esq. 

of Kells, County of Meath, and late of Booglah 

Factory, who dei)arted this life 16th Doe. 1821, 

aged 46 years. 

This is inscribed by his affectionate and 

once happy wife, Catherine. 

'Tis religion can give 
Sweetest pleasures while we live, 
'Tis religion must supply 
Solid comfort when we die. 



Sacred to the Memory of CalbariBtt, 

relict of the late Joseph Thomson, Esq. 

of Booglah Factory, Furreedpore, who departed 

this life at Calcutta on the 2nd of September 1847, 

aged 54 years and 10 months. 
Deeply and sincerely regretted. Has Monument is 
erected to her Memory by her affectionate children. 



Here lieth the infant daughter of 

R. M. Thomas* Ksq. 

" Of such is the kingdom of UeaTen." 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Anne Mtiaelbacky 
who de])arted this life on the 17^ Jaly 1834, 

aged 48 years and 9 months. 

This Monument was erected by her affectionate 

sons, R. S. and W. M. Meiadback. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas KsUy, 

Master in the H. C. M. died May 26tii, 1822, 

aged 32 years and 6 mo&tfai. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



163 



Stcred to th« Memory of Mrs. Mary Ann Kelly, 
who died Uth July 1836, aged 34 years 
2 months and 9 days, i 



Sacred to the Memory of Emilia Augusta, 

the affectionate wife of £. White, 
died 12th December 1836, aged 29 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jane Adams, 
who departed this mortal life the 3rd Sejit. \A'M), 

afed 34 jeara. In testimony of whose worth, 
thia Monument ia erected by her affetrtionate hu>- 
band, James Smith Adams. 



Sacred to the Memory of Miss Adelaide Berric, 

who departed thia life on the 18th of Dec. IbOl . 

aged 5 years aud 1 1 months. 

Alto to the Memory uf Mrs. Mary Berrie, 

who departed this life on the 1st of July 1833, 

aged 80 years. 

As a small tribute of respect to the Memory of 

departed worth this stone has been placed by 

her daughter, Emma Hubbard. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Hanry Goniinf^ Ayscoug^h Browme, 

9on cit Major Thomas Browne, of Cannonslcii^h 

Abbey, D>eTonflhire, who died on the lOth Ocl. 

1818, aged 17 years and 7 months. 

Mrs. Helen Aldwell, died 15th Feb. 1821, 
aged 34 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

0«or|^ Alejtandar l^atson, 

died 7th August 1822, aged 21 months. 

Sacred to departed worth. 
Here lies the remams of John Zmlay, 
died 5th June 1822, aged 39 years 3 mouths. 
In him were united in an eminent degree all the 

▼irtoes of a true Christian ; a tender and 
•flbetionate husband. Hi<< artlicted widow Hud 
four children will evor have to lament. 
his loss. Aim luilav. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Anne Zaabella Zmlay, 
died 2l8t Sept. 1831, aged 10 years. 
The hand that formed her knew her wort}i. nnd 
took her amongst His own in heaven. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Joseph ^^Tren, 

late Lif^t-house keeper, at Kedjreree, 

died Jan. 12th, 1820, aged 10 voir-. 



Sacred to the Memory of John Brown, 

who died on the 17th Dec. 1831, .l^^tat 30 yeHvs 

Erected by a few of his frieiwK. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr«. S. Squire, 
who died 25th June 1835, aged 36 years, 5 mus. 

and 12 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of AdeUdde Charity, 

if^hst daughter of Lieut. Richard and Mrs. 

Angdo, 84th Regt. N. I. died 19th Dec. 1832, 

aged 9 months and 25 days. 



In Memory of Lieut. IV. H. IVhittle, R. X 

idw departed this life on the 5th Juno 1822. 

aged 32 year*. 



in Memory of Mr. Alexander Harper, 

brother of Mr. William Harper of Corahill, 

London, who departed this life 8th Dee. 1825. 

aged 'Ab years. 



To the Memory of 
Lieut. Alfred Zaeonard IVillis, 

32d Regt. N. 1. Obit. 1st May 1832. 

yV>at 27 years. 

Thi« stone is ere'-ted by his bereaved widnw, 

Mnria Willis. 



Snered to the M'-mory of John Dunn, 

who departed this life on the 27th June IH2J, 

u^i'd 35 years. 



S.-iored to the Memory of 
.Mr. Daniel MLinanian, 

boi*n at Faliuoufh in Nov. 179D, died at Oalcutfa 

on the lUlh June 1837. 
Tills stone is ereettnl by his uflrctiuu.-ite brother. 
Tiioiu.t.s Kiiijiuau. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Archibald, of Dundee, 
late Accountant li. C. New Mint, Obit. 14th 
May 1832, /ICtat 29 y<'ars anjl H month.-;. 
An honest man, whose gcu'roua heart could feel, 
Tlic patijj or joy of otluTs* v.oe or weal. 
This Moiur.nent has berii ereetej by his friends, 
to whom he was atfectionateiy endeared. 



Sacrfrd to the Memory of Air. R. J. Jeffreys, 

yi)ungest son of the late Rev. H. Jeffreys, 

Rector of Ilford, Essex, who died on the 

loth Sept. 1831, in the 23d year of lii.s age, 

deeply regretted. 

Tn Memory of Benjamin DeMayne, 

who died Feb. 8th 1819, aged 31 yeari?. 



Sacred to the Memory ol Mrs. Ann IVardlow, 
who died Hth May lH3r>. a;red 3.") years. 1 numtho 

niid rj davs. 



Life how fchort c temity how loni 
^acn^d to the .Memory of Charlotte Ismce, 






Obit. 23d Muy 1825, .Etat 25 years, 5 months 

and 17 days. 
Iler most deeply afflicted Inisband, to whom she 

ne\er was the cause of grief, exeept by her 
premature death, and who is left with five children 
to lament his irreparable loss, has ertctrd tliis 
tablet sacred to ht r virtues and to his sorrow. 



In Memory ot Jane Radcllffe, 

who departed this life 29th January 1819, 
aged 22 years. 

Syered to the Memory of Mrs. Slizabeth Ham, 
who departed this life on the 19th of Jan. 1819, 

aged 80 years. 



•^ncred to the Memory of Mr*. Mary laef^h, 
the beloved wife of Mr. W. Legh, who departed 
this life on the 13th April 1831, aged 18 yeJtrs. 



In Memory of IWilliam, the bcIovr<l son of 

William and Louisa Legh, died 2d June 183G, 

aged 2 years, 3 mouths and 7 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Zaewis Namey, 

late Head Clerk of the Police Office, 

who departed this life on the Uth March 1828, 

aged 46 years. 4 months aud 20 days. 



V 2 



164 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



iMbeUa fiUMbeth Kerr, Aliaii Moira, 

A Native ChriBtian, who was early brought to the 

knowledge of the truth and enabled to sow 

the seeds of practical piety in the minds 

cf her children. These, in committing her dear 

remains to the earth on this spot, record their 
gratitude to God for the comforts and privileges 

she enjoyed during an extended pilgrimage 
of near 70 years, and for the remarkable serenity 
of mind experienced by her in the hour of 
dissolution. Obit. 6th August 1832. 
" Thy prayers and thine alms are come up for 
a memorial before God." — Acts, Chap. xv. 4. 

In Memory of Mrs. Sliaabeth Kerr, 
wife of Mr. John Kerr, Asst. in the Mily Audr. 

Genl's. Office, died 2d April 1837, 
leaving a disconsolate husband and ten children. 
The unaffected simplicity of her heart, joined 

to a life of virtue, must ever make her 

husband and her children feel and her friends 

lament their irreparable loss. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. John Auf^strui Kerr, 

who departed this life on the 5th April 1847, 

aged 27 years, 9 months and 28 days. 

Afflictions so long time he bore. 

Physicians strove in vain. 
Till God did please that death should come. 

And ease him of his pain. 

This Tablet is placed by his afflicted widow 

as a Memorial of that goodness of heart, 
benevolence of disposition, and amiability of 
temper which endeared him to all his relations 
and secured to him the affection of a large 
circle of friends. 
" There the wicked cease from troubling, and 
there the weary are at rest." — Job iii. 17. 

James Isvwim Jackson, 

died 17th April 1825, aged 25 yn. and 7 mos. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Driver, 
late of Babookholly, Indigo Planter, who 
departed this life on the 25th day of April 
A. D. 1822, aged 47 years 8 months. 
Regretted by his friends and relations, and sin- 
cerely lamented by his widow and children. 

Monsr. Dimitri Robertson, 
died 23d Dec. 1837, aged 30 yean. 



Sarred to the Memory of Mr. O. J. Verboon, 

who departed this life on the 5th March 

1831, aged 56 years. 

A tender parent, a sincere friend, 
Lov'd in his life and lamented in his end. 

This Monument is erected by his affectionate 
wife, Juliana Verboon. 



In Memory of the infant and younfert eon of 

Baarasl SSamptiMa, Esq. 

born 3d of Dec. I81H, died 12tk of July 1819. 

aged 7 months and 9 days. 

" Of such is the kingdom of heayen." 

Sacred to the Memory of Ohsrles Jseoby 
the beloved son of Robert and Rachel 
Arrowsmith, (H. C. Marine,) died 24th May 
1835, aged 3 years, 5 months and 28 days. 
** The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away ; 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



In Memory of Mr. Thomas Qnrr, Master Pilot. 

who was lost by the wreck of the Ship 

Raj Ranee on the eastern reef, on the lit of Angt. 

1838, aged 45 years, 4 months and 12 days. 

He was a loving and an affectionate hnaband. 

My Saviour shall my soul restore. 
And raise me from my dark abode. 
My flesh and soul shall part no more. 
But dwell for ever near my God. 

This tablet is inscribed by his disconsolate 
wife, Maria Gurr. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. mrUlimm Spsnee, 

Master Pilot, who departed this life on the 

27th of July 1838, ag^ 40 yean. 

He was an affectionate husband, a tender father 

and a sincere friend ; leaving a disconsolate 

wife and seven chOdren to lament 

their irreparable lots. 

Go home my friends, and cease yoor tears, 
I must lie here till Christ appears, 
Repent in time, whOe time yon have. 
There's no repentance in the grave. 



To the Memory of Jane wm^m»m^i^, 

daughter of Mr. W. Spenoe, H. C. Marine, 

died 22d Feb. 1832, aged 8 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Andrew Goldsmith, 

and Glara Ooldsmith, son and mother. 

The former, who died on the 7tfa July 1837, 

aged 26 years, 3 months and 14 days. 

And the latter, who died on the 

3l8t May 1838, aged 65 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Thonuui Svtty 
died 17th Jan. 1826, aged about 36 years. 

I'o the Memory of J. F. O. Saad, 

who departed this life 26th April 1833, 

in the 33rd year of his age. 



Mrs. M. R. Randy 
died 17th December 1838, aged 32 years. 
" The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. 
blessed be the name of the Lord. Amen." 



In Memory of Mrs. Mary Og^, 
died 9th Dec. 1837, aged 40 yeara. 



Mrs. C. Hand, died 9th July 1834, aged 29 years. 

Mr. S. B. Har^y, died 25tb Jan. 1835, 
aged 20 years, 9 months and 6 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. T. J. Shaw, 

who departed this life on the 30th Jan. 

1816, aged 18 years and 5 months. 

" Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord.'* 



Here lies the body of Capt. David D. Hill, 

of Philadelphia, who died on the 

4th June 1818, aged 31 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Miss M. A. Ii. filsrwcy, 

who departed this life on tiie 17th of March 1845. 

aged 34 years, 5 months and 4 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. ••w.m^ «.•»«., 
late 3rd officer of the H. C. ship " Coldstream.'* 
who departed tliis life on the 4th Nov. 1815, 
^tatis 27. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



165 



Sacred to the Memory of 

lieatenant-Colonel John Popham IXTataon, 

of H. M. 75th Regt. of Foot, who departed this 

life the 8th June 1804, aged 31 years. 

In the lame tomb are enterred the remains of his 

kinamao. Ensign Tidw Anth. ZXnll| a youth 

of the sweetest disposition and fairest promise, 

who died on the 23rd December 1817, 

iEt. 16 years and 4 months. 



Sacred to the Memory of Isabella, wife of 

the late 6. Daniel, of the H. E. I. C. Marine, 

died 5th March 1831, aged 72 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Elisabeth Thomas, the lady of 

Mr. John Thomas, died 25th May 1825, 

aged 32 years, 2 months and 21 days, 

leaving a disconsolate husband and six children 

with a numerous circle of friends to bewail her 

irreparable loss. She was beloved and respected 

by all her friends and acquaintances. 



Sacred to the Memory of Miss Elisa Dererell, 
died the 12th April 1819, aged 7 years. 

ITie fiunily Monument of William Smith, 
of the Political Office. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Marg^aret Statham, wife of 

Mr. H. Q. Statham, who departed this life on the 

5th August 1832, aged 25 years. 

Aleo her infimt child died on the 10th Jan. 1831, 

aged 1 month and 10 days. 

And in Memory of 

Marf^aret Isabella Statham, 

bora 18th April 1832, died 31st March 1833. 

Miss Ii. A. M. Hart, 
died IStii July 1828, aged 3 months and 20 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Osfli'MS Rastincs Ziane, who departed (his life 

on the IWb. Jan. 1826, aged 20 yrs. and 8 mos. 

Thia Mcmument is raised by his most affectionate 

mother, lamenting the premature death of a 

most beloved son. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Oatherine Ghreene, 
whose exemplary discharge of her several duties 

to her God, to her family and to society, 

eminently entitled her to respect in this world, 

and it if humbly and devoutly hoped has secured 

to her eternal Ufe and bliss, where sickness, pain 

md tOTTOw cannot enter. She died on the 20th 

of January 1811, aged 34 years. 

BC. O'Weale, 
departed this life on the 13th July 1827. 
aged 42 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss Sliaa Allan, 

daoj^iter of the late Mr. S. C. Allan, of the 

Revwoe Board Office, died 25th Nov. 1826, 

aged 15 years, 5 months and 18 days. 

Also of her uncle, Air. James CNeale, 

1^ liei interred in the same tomb, died 16th 

January 1827, aged 27 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. 8. C. Allan, 
Obit. Slat Jan. 1826, JEt. 39 years. 
Requiescat in pace. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Sarah Ann Bnrridg^e, 

daughter of Joseph and Catharine Burridge, 

who departed this life on the 14th Dec. 1825. 

aged 5 years, 10 months and 8 days. 

Alsio James Peter Bnrridg^e, 

son of J. and C. Burridge, who departed this 

life on the 26th July 1826, aged 20 days. 



To the Memory of Mrt. Catherine Burridi^, 

who died on the 23d of Nov. 1830, 
aged 27 years, 7 months and 14 days. 

Also Sacred to the Memory of 

Joseph Burridf^e, Master in th« H. C. B. Marine, 

who departed this life on the 27th June 1832, 

on board the H. C. Vessel " Experimental," 

on his return from Ghazeepore, aged 38 years. 

To the Memory- of Mrs. Mary Zialne, Sr. 
died Aug. 18th, 1820, aged 47 years. 

In Memory of John Thomas Ziane, 

who departed thia life 9th October 1826, 
aged 20 years, 4 months. 

This Monument is raised by an afflicted mother, 
bereaved of the only two sons she was blest with. 

" I shall go to them, but they shall not return 
to me." 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. James ZXoratIo Ilowe, 

who departed this life on the 17th July 1832, 
aged 21 years and 7 months. 
" Affection's last sad tribute." 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. A. Peterson, 

who died 5th of Sept. 1829, aged 39 years 

and 6 months. 

This inscription is inscribed by his affectionate 

wife, E. Peterson. 



Sacred to the Memory of Marg^aret IVUliaaas, 

who departed this Ufe on the 9th March 1828, 

aged 22 years. 

Reader, pause and reflect for a while, 
This is the sure place to rest from toil ; 
With sickness I was sore opprest, 
Kind death has eas'd me, I lie here at rest. 

This tomb is erected by her most sincere and 
affectionate friend, B. H. 



■ • ^k^* 



. 16th July 1819. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
James "^VilUam Hi^^s, H. C S. 

died 23d Aug. 1845, aged 18 years and 3 months. 

Son of J. W. Higgins, Branch Pilot, who was 

drowned in the Hurricane of 1833, with all 

hands, off Saugor Point in charge of 

ship *' Sultan." 

In Memory of Thomas Martin, 

was drowned 25th May 1813, aged 28 years, 
5 months and 1 1 days. 



A 1m T. Martin, his soo, died 30th May 1837, 
aged 18 years, 5 months and 27 dajrs. 

A Iso to the Memory of James Mowrell, 

who died Sept. 13th, 1833, aged 33 yearii, 

3 months and 7 days. 



166 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory Miss Marj l^oodin, 

died 25th Sept. 1837, aged 42 years, 8 months 

and 25 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of SSannah Bronf^h, 

rho died on the 29th of July 1821, aged 49 yrs. 

Erected by Miss William in token of regard. 



Charlotte Sophia Zaond, 
bom 14th Jan. 1809, died 1st August 1821. 

Sacred to the Memory of Bella Penelope, 

the infant daughter of John Adrian and Mary 

Ann Ryper, who departed this hfe on the 13th 

of June 1831, aged 10 months and 20 days. 

Here lieth the mortal remains of 
M iss Mary Anne Ryper, 
who departed this life on the 24th of Nov. 1832, 
aged 30 years, 2 months and 16 days. 
Snatch'd by untimely death reposeth here 
A virtuous wife, a friend and parent dear ; 
Her children's sorrow and her husband's grief 
This stone may speak ; but nought can give 

relief ; 
With her this tomb may perish in decay, 
But death alone can wipe their tears away. 
This Monument is erected by her affectionate 
husband, J. A. R. 



EUsa Matada Smith, 

daughter of Cors. and Elizabeth Smith, Nat. 12th 
Feb. 1816, Obit. 21st May 1819. 



Harriet Stewart Bayley, 

the infant daughter of W. B. Bayley, Esq. 
born December 23d, 1817, died June 6th, 1819. 



Frederick Rnddell Jackson, 

son of Capt. James Nesbitt Jackson, died 13th 
Aug. 1823, aged 2 years and 7 months. 

Maria, the infant dauprhter of 
Alexander Colvin, Esq. born 25th, died 31st 

of December 1823. 
Likewise an infant son, born and died 13th of 

June 1825. Likewise Maria, his infant 
daughter, born and died 28th of Aug. 1838. 

Sacred to the Memonr of 
Master Peter Emanuel Kramer, 

son of the late Adjutant Kramer of the Dutch 

Company's Service, Chinsurah, who departed this 

life July 23d, 1804, aged 15 years. 

To the Memory of the infant son of 
Charles Boiler, 
bom August 26th, 1811, died October 9th, 
aged 44 days. 



Here lies the mortal remains of a dear infant, 

the daughter of R. DeCourcy, Esq. 

who died on the 30th May 1822. 



Sacred to the Memory of Theodore ..«•»,, 

the infant son of Theodore and Maria Dickens, 

bom Feb. 14th, died Oct. 14th 1828. 



Mary Frances Vincentia, 

the daughter of George and Pulcherie Money, 
born Nov. 5th, 1817, died Feb. 20th, 1820. 



In Memory of Miss Mary Ann Tyler* 
died 24th April 1821, aged 8 mos. and 19 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Horatio Anipistus, 

died 19th Dec. 1830, aged 4 mos. and 19 daja. 

Ebenessr, died 16th July 1832, 

aged 8 months and 17 days. 

Rebecca, died 29th August 1835, 

aged 1 month 13 days ; 

DaTid, died 18th of Dec. 1838. aped 2 days. 

Children of Joseph and Mary Richardson. 



Sarred to the Memory of Mary, the wife of 

Mr. Joseph Richardson, who slept in Jesns the 

27th of December 1838, 

aged 38 years and 11 days. 

When sorrow weeps o'er rirtue's sacred dost, 
Our tears become us and our grief is just ; 
Such are the tears he sheds who grat^l pays 
This last sad tribute of his love and praise ; 
Wlio mourns the best of wira and fneods com- 

bin'd. 
Wliere female softness meet a manly mind ; 
Mourns but not murmurs, weeps but not despairs, 
Feels as a man hut as a Christian bears. 



Sacred to the Memory of John, 

5th son of Mr. Joseph Richardson, died 30th 

April 1839, aged 15 years, 3 months and 27 days, 

deservedly regretted by his surriyin^ parent. 

Sacred to the HHemorj of 

Lieut. James Greene, of the Bengal Artillery, 

bom 18th of April 1805, died of the 

Arracan Fever on the 5th October 1825. 

Ilis gallant conduct at Arracan gained him the 

respect of his corps, and his amiable 

manners endeared him to his relations and friends. 



Edward Abbott, 

Obit. 27th July 1829, iEtat. 5 days. 

And his mother, laney Marls, wife of 

William Henry Abbott of Calcutta, Esquire, 

bom 4th April 1799, died 30th April 1835» 

aged 36 years. 

Also Oharlesy son of the said 

W. H. Abbott, and Lucy Maria his wife, 

born 9th June 1825, died 2d April 1845, 

aged 19 y^rs. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mary Aaaslia, 
infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Morrell, 
born on the 19th and died on the 
25th of April 1833. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Sdwrard &obert Maldaa Hudson, 

the dearly loved child of Nathaniel and Margaret 

Hudson, who departed this life on the 29th 

June 1821, aged 4 years, 9 moatfas and 13 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of l^tnl*«w^ 

the infant son of Captain W. J. Crawley, 

who departed this life September 20th, 1853, 

aged 1 month and 16 days. 
This Monument has been erected by his affee* 
tionate mother, Elizabeth Crawley. 



At the instance of Captain Thoe. Laridns, 

and to the Memory of Thonuui Pciyntliup, Esq. 

Commander of the Ship *' Resolution," in the 

service of the United Company of MerdiaatB of 

England trading to the East Indiei* who 

most bravely ddeaded the " Eetolutioa.** 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



167 



Stored to the Memory of John Stark, 
who departed this life on the 13th October 1838, 
aged 34 jeara, 9 months and 3 days, 
leaying a widow and eight children. 

** I Was dumb ; I opened not my mouth because 
thou didst it,"— Ps. 39. v. 9. 



In Memory of IXTUliam ZZif^^ins, 
of Snowland, Kent, late Commander of the 
Steamer ** Forbes," who died 
8th August 1841, aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Harriet Botelho, 

the beloved wife of Mr. Robert Botclho, 

who departed this life on the 6th of Nov. 1840, 

aged 23 years, 9 months and 22 days. 

Mr. Robert Botelho, 

who departed this life on the 6th of Aug. 1811, 

aged 25 years, 7 months and 26 days. 

Caroline. 

the beloved wife of Mr. Francis Botelho, 

who departed this life 14th Dec. 1841, aged 22 yrs. 

Oh ! early snatch'd from all who held her dear ; 
As friend, wife, mother, she wa;» matchless here ; 
Virtue like her's to earth is seldom giv'n. 
Too good to dwell with us, bhe's gone to heaven. 



the infant son of Mr. Robert Botelho, 
who departed this life 17th Maich 1844, 
aged 3 years, 4 months and 29 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Maria ZIorton, 
who departed this life on the 9th April 1840, 

aged 37 years and 3 months. 
'* Blessed are those who die in the Lord, from 
henoefore, yea saith the Spirit, for they rest from 
tbdr liboors." 

Also Sacred to the Memory of 

my beloved son-in-law, ^V. N. Dodd, 

who departed this life on the 29th August 1840, 

aged 26 years and 7 months. 



Sacred to the Memory cf Mr. John Owens, 
who died 23rd March 1 840, aged 49 years. 
ThJiM stone is placed by his affectionate wife. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. l^iUiam Hodg^es, 

who departed this life on the 13th Nov. 1842, 

aged 37 years and 9 months, deeply regretted. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Min Amelia Ghriatlana Mackintosh, 

bom 15th December 1839, died 26th June 1844, 

aged 5 years, 6 months and 12 days. 

'Tis to the infant dead. 

The blessed word is giv'n 

Tbielr Angels live ! the Saviour said, 

Hound the bright throne in Heav'n. 

No -storms thoie stainless flowers shall tear, 

The snow drops never wither there. 



lu Memory of ^ITilliam Conner IXTalker, 

Midshipman of the Merchant Ship 

" Owen Gbnidower," who was unfortunately 

drowned 22nd Nov. 1840, aged 18 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
ZXenry Thomsks Palmer, 

son of Henry and Elvira Louisa Palmer, 
died 30th May 1*841, aged 8 months and 10 days. 

** Suffer little children to come unto me and 
forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of 
God." 

Also in Memory of his grandmother, 

Mrs. Charlotte Champenois, 
died 21st January 1842, aged 47 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
James Oeorg^e ^Vadsnvortii Ceronio, 

who departed this life on the 5 th Aug. 1839, 
aged 30 years and 15 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Otto, 

son of the late Captain Rowley Otto, 

who departed this life on the 9th Dec. 1839, 

aged 41 years. 

This Monument is erected by his mother, 

Bebee Khanum. 



Here lies Mrs. Elisabeth Ridley, 

wife of Mr. John Ridley, senr. died August 1808. 

Miss Caroline Ridley, 

daughter of Mr. John Ridley, senr. 
died 6th September 1833. 

Miss Smelia Ridley, 

daughter of Mr. John Ridley Junr. 
died 25th July 1842. 

Mrs. Charlotte Frances Ridley, 

wife of Mr. John Ridley, junr. 

died 11th November 1844, 

aged 24 years, 8 months and 28 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. John Caird, Ltveiy Stable Keeper, 

died 19th January 1841, 

aged 40 years, 2 months and 10 days. 

Life how short, eternity how long. 

Sacred to tlie Memory of Alfred, 

the beloved son of Mr. J. A. and Mrs. C. Ryper, 

died 6th March 1844, aged 2 ms. and 5 dys. 

Sleep on sweet child and take thy rest, 

God caUs first those whom he loves best. 



Saored to the Memory of Slisabeth, 

the beloved wife of Mr. Alexander Dozey, junr. 

who departed this life on the 23d March 1844, 

aged 23 years, 3 months and 7 days. 

O ! early snatch'd from all who held her dear. 
As friend, wife, mother, she was matchless here ; 
Virtue like her's to earth is seldom given. 
Too good to dwell with us, she's gone to heaven. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. A. Doaey, Senr. 

who departed this life on the 1st July 1845, 

aged 52 years, 5 months and 12 days. 

Reader ! pause and reflect for a while. 
This is the sure place to rest from toil ; 
With sickness 1 was sore opprest. 
Kind death has eas'd me, 1 Ue here at rest. 



Ici repose PauUne Thonon, 

Decedee la 30 Mars 1842, son Ame este Avec 

dien priez pour ceux qui sorvivent. 



r 



168 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander Frederiok Ryper, 

died 16th April 1839» aged 1 year, 
10 months and 17 days. 

Bright as the star that sparkles in the west, 
Pare as the dew-drop on the lily's breast, 
He came awhile to tremble and to shine, 
Then rose like incense to the eternal shrine. 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Henry l^Uliam Kuhn, 

died 22d April 1841, aged 3 years, 

10 months and 4 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Qustaphe Emannel ICnhn, 

who departed this life on the 27th Oct. 1841, 
aged 8 years, 8 months and 14 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Adeline Knhn, 

who departed this life on the 17th Jane 1846, 

aged 17 years and 2 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of D. F. RodrigpoMS, Esq. 

who departed this life 25th May 1841, 

aged 48 years. 

Also Mrs. Sni^nia Danclas, 
who departed this life 4th Dec. 1841, aged 40yrs. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Samuel Cook, Engineer, H. C. S. 
who died 9th May 1840, aged 26 years, 11 mos. 

and 22 days. 

How fleeting and transitory is life, and how sure 

and certain is death. 



In Memory of Mrs. S. Iieard, 
died 31st May 1841, aged 36 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles AXaclean Pratt, 

died 7th July 1840, aged 59 years. 
** Thy will be done." 

Sacred to the Memory of Mary Hind, 
died 11th Feb. 1841, aged 13 years. 



Sacred to the Memory of Sasan Cecilia, 

wife of Mr. F. Fantom, and daughter of the late 

Mr. J. Mills, who departed this life on the 9th 

NoTcmber 1842, aged 26 years, 5 months 

and 27 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Sophia, the dearly beloved wife of 
Captain H. A. Boscawen, 54th Regt. B. N. I. 
and the dutiful and affectionate daughter of the 

late Sophia and W. C. Hollings, Esq. 
It pleased God to take her unto himself on the 
15th day of Feb. 1842, in the 32d year of her age, 

after a painful illness of a few hours. 

This Monument is erected to her Memory by her 

sorrowing husband, as a tribute of fond and 

devoted attachment. 
" Be merciful to me, O God, be merciful unto 
me, for my soul trusteth in thee, yea in the shadow 
of thy wings, will I make my refuge until these 
calamities be overpast." — Ps. 57. v. 1. 

" For I know that thou wilt bring me to death 
and to the house appointed for all Hving." — Job 
30. v. 23. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Bfannel Vajne 

who departed this life 27th Feb. 1844, 

aged 38 years, 7 mondii and 6 days. 

And his wife, Elisabeth Vajna*. ' 
who departed this life 20th May 1844, 
aged 32 years, 2 months and 8 days. 



Mr. Henry FhHUps, 
died 24th Aug. 1841, aged 38 years. 
This is inscribed by his brotho*, Vnmaa Botelb 



Sacred to the Memory of Joseph 
who departed this life on the 3d Sept. 1839, 
aged 8 years and 2 days. 

filisabeth Morley, 

who departed this life 13th Feb. 1840, 
aged 5 years, 9 months and 8 days. 



Also to the Memory of 

who departed this lifs on the 6th Nov. 1840, 

aged 40 years. 

Father of the abore. 

This Monument is erected by his alfectiona 

widow. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. P. O. Robertson, 
71st Regt. N. I. and second hi comxaand of tb 
Kotah Contingoit, who was killed at Bisss^por 
on the Bonass, the 12th Febroary 1844, by the 

accidental disdiarge of his rifle. 

This tablet is erected by an affectionate wife, 

brother and sister as a token of lore towards a 

deeply lamented husband and brottier. 



In Memory of 
John Hntcheson Fergussoa, 

youngest son of William Feigosson, Inspector 
General of Hospitals H. M. Service, who dued 22 

November 1832, aged 22 years. 
This stone is erected by his affectionate brother 
William and James Fergnsson. 



Sacred to the Memory of SUn* wife of 

Mr. Edward Davy Fabian, Seinor Branch Pilot, 

who departed this life on the 2d August 1843, 

aged 44 years and 10 montiis. 
" The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away 
blessed be the name of the Lord.'* 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Qt o i ' ge 
of the H. C. Marine, who died Srd June 1834, 
aged 29 years. 

Good Christians on me cast an eye. 
As you are now, so once was I, 
As I am now, so you must be, 
So then prepare to follow me. 
Erected by Mr. E. D. Fabian. 



Sacred to the Memory of Abraham Pcrie» 

the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Fabisn, 

who died 2d May 1845, aged 8 months 

and 17 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. R. T. Arrowsmith, 

died Ut May 1840, aged 33 years, 3 months 
and 25 days. 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



1C9 



S«cred to the Memory of 
Mr. Frederick Fabian, 

who departed this life on the Cth Au^. 1845, 

aged 22 years, 1 1 months and 22 days. 

This tablet is erected by Ids atfectioimtc brotlier. 

A. Fabian. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Oeorg^ana Slixa Safce, 
who died on the 7th May 1840, aged 3 years, 

6 months and 11 days. 

This tablet is erected by her afflicted mother. 

Fatiier. if thou be willing, remove this cup from 

me, nevertheless not ray will but thine be done. 



Sacred to the Memory of the infant danj^hter of 

Mr. and Mrs. James Turner, bom 23d N(»v. 

1844, died 16th Jan. 1845. 



In Memory of ]>apre Francis John, 
onlychild of lieut. G. W. Bishop, /Ist Rcgt. N. I. 
died 4th July 1840, aged 9 mouths and 22 days. 



Sacred to the Memory of Major ^V. Baillie, 
of the Engineers, who departed this life on 

the 6th Jane 1799, aged 46 years. 

AKo Mrs. A. M. Bailliei relict ot the above, 

who died on the 27th April 1840, aged 67 years. 

Thia tablet ia erected by their three children. 



Sacred to the Memory of James Gollen, E^q. 

eminendy distinguished for a most ardent 

attachment to his family, as a son and brother, 

In the kind affections of the heait, endearing, 

the friend and the companion, equalled 
by few. In the upright integrity of character, 

diatinguishing the merchant and the man, 

surpaaaed by none, and by all who cultivated his 

acquaintance and knew his worth. 

Esteemed and beloved. He died 14th June 184 1 , 

aged 45 years and 6 months. 



A tribute of affection to the Memory of 
I*. F. Bourkey, who died at sea 

on the 21st June 1840, aged 29 ve^irs. 
Also his only child, Sophia itfora, 

who died at Calcutta on the 2jth Dec. 
1842, aged 3 years, 3 months and 15 days. 



Iiomisa, tlie beloved wife of 
Rev. R. B. Boswell, Chaplain, B. S., and daughter 

of Sir A. Dunbar of Northfield, Baronet. 

Bom atDuffershouaa, Morayshire, 24th Aug. 1812. 

Relying on the only Saviour of truth, 

waahed in His atoning blood, 

ahe had peace with God. 

If thou our Sariour still art nigh. 
Cheerful we live and cheerful we die ; 
Secure when human comforts flee. 
To find ten thousand worlds in thee. 



Sacred to the Memory of Marg^aret Jemima, 

the bdiored child of Charles and Harriet Lyall, 

who departed this life the 21st March 1840, 

aged 1 year, 9 months and 24 days. 

*' Oif such ia the kingdom of Heaven." 



Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Bagnall, 

who died 6th AprU 1844, 

aged 2G years, 7 months and 20 days. 



In Memory of Bdward D'Oyly Barwell, F.^q. 
Barrister at Law, who died November 9th, 1840, 
aged 30 yearf<, 7 months and 17 days. 

'* I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me 
vrrite, blessed are the dead which die in tlie Lord 
from henceforth, yea, saith the spirit, that they 
may rest from their labour.K." 

Also in Memory of 
Ed^^ard Henry Colqnhoun, 
the infant son of Edward D'Oyly Harwell, E.sq. 

and Anna Maria Louisa his wife, 
died Aj)ril 27th, 1840, aged 1 year and 3 day.s. 

*' Of such is the kingdom of Heaven." 

This tribute to his Memory was erected by 
his affectionate widow. 



Sacred to tlie Memory of Frances Mary, 

the beloved wife of Lieut. Fredck. B. Wardroper, 

B. N. 1. who died on the 14th Dec. 1841, 

deeply lamented by a bereaved husband. 

Also to the Memory of her beloved brother, 

Francis ZXo^rard IVhite, 

Obit. 26th November 1830, iEtat 21. 



Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. laouisa Gordon, 

died June 4th, 1831, aged 37 years. 
An affectionate wife and a tender mother ; and of 
Oeori^e Johnston Phillips, born 8th July 1813, 
who was drowned at Sulkeah on the 8th 
December 1836, aged 23 years and 5 months. 

" Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O 
Lord." 

Also of John Georfi^e Phillips, Junr. 
bom 30th June 1824, and died 5th April 1841. 
aged 16 years, 9 months and 5 day.^. 
'* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 



.^acred to tlu* Memory of John Smith, Ksq. 
formerly of Chowgutcha, Jessore, 
died 7th Feb. 1844, aged 20 years. 



In Memory of Sophia Emelia, 

infant daughter of Frederick and Maria Millett, 

died 14th October 1841, aged 5 days. 



Here lieth the mortal remains of 

Alexander Fraser, K^q. Born at Ruihven 4ih 

Aug. 1805, died at Calcutta 20th August 183r>. 

A Itio Qeori^e "^Valker IVilson Fraser, Ktq. 

who departed this life the 26th November 1843. 

Sons of George Fraser, Esq. of Manchester. 



To the Memory of Ensign H. Russell, 

20th Regt. N. I. died 10th November 1833. 

Erected by his brother officers as a lasting tribute 

of their regard. 



Sacreil to the Memory of Mrs. Anne Zmlaj, 

widow of the late Mr. John Imlay, who departed 

this life on the 20th July 1843, aged 47 years, 

1 month and 17 days. 

This tablet over the remains of a beloved parent 

is consecrated to departed worth, as affection's 

last tribute, by her sorrowing family. 



i 



170 



SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 



In Memory of Thomaa Conraa, 

died Sth Dec. 1840, aiced 9 yrs. 2 mos. and 20 days. 

Erected by hiii aflectionate mother. 



Here lieth the remains of two infant children of 
Edward Hamilton and Georgiana C